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Continuing and Pro. Studies Course Descriptions

BEHLT Behavioral and Health Services BIOL Biology
BUS Business COMM Communications
CSSEM Capstone Seminar ECON Economics
EMS Emergency Services FINC Finance
HIST History HLTSV Health Services
HRM Human Resources Management HUMN Humanities
IT Information Technology LAWEN Law Enforcement
LHS Leadership in Homeland Security MATH Mathematics
MGMT Management MKTG Marketing
OTA Occupational Therapy Assistantship PSYCH Psychology
SOC Sociology STAT Statistics
WRTG Writing

BEHLT-290 3-0-3

Clinical Interactions in Behavioral Health
This course builds on communication and clinical skills learned throughout other coursework and provides students with a framework for the development of critical thinking skills and patient-centered care perspectives within a variety of healthcare settings. Clinical reasoning skills such as patient triage, hierarchy of needs, short-term and long-term goal setting, and advanced assessment will be covered.

Prerequisites: COMM 310 and PSYCH 233


BEHLT-341 (Formerly J605)3-0-3

Behavioral Health and Neurorehabilitation
Focusing on the needs of clients and patients in specific environments, this course integrates behavioral and health sciences in the description of a range of interventions. Students will study specialized services used in the delivery of neuropsychology, rehabilitation nursing, occupational therapy and a variety of other fields. 


BEHLT-499 (Formerly J610)3-0-3

Applied Project in Behavioral Health and Neurorehabilitation
Using the principles learned in CPS Core coursework, and/or applied psychology, neurorehabilitation, or behavioral health, this course requires students to design and develop a program directed toward addressing the health needs of an individual client/patient or group of individuals. Students are encouraged to apply their project to the future work environment where they plan to apply their expertise. Portfolio-based assessment allows students to demonstrate proficiency through display of artifacts related to their plan along with the presentation of documents that either assess the design of the project or describe project implementation.

Prerequisite: CPS Core coursework


BIOL-202ACC3-0-3

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This course is the second of a two term sequence. This course will examine anatomical and physiological aspects of the following systems of humans: sensory, endocrine, circulation, respiration, nutrition-digestion, excretion and reproductive. During lecture, both anatomy and physiology will be discussed. While some lab sessions will focus mainly on the anatomy of the current system, most laboratory sessions will involve physiological experiments to provide students with greater insight into the physiology of the current system. A close correlation between lecture and laboratory topics will be maintained.

Co-requisite: BIOL-202LACC

Prerequisites: BIOL-201 Minimum Grade of C-


BIOL-202LACC0-2-1

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
The A&P laboratory sessions will provide students with hands-on learning opportunities to help conceptualize content discussed in lecture. During lab, students will work on problem sets, examine and dissect organs and/or anatomical models, use microscopes, perform basic physiological experiments and examine cadaver specimens. While some lab sessions will focus mainly on the anatomy of the current system, most laboratory sessions will involve physiological experiments to provide students with greater insight into the physiology of the current system.

Co-requisite: BIOL-202ACC.

Prerequisites: BIOL 201L Minimum Grade of C-


BUS-499 (Formerly J525)3-0-3

Business Capstone Seminar
The process and techniques of strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation are studied and applied. Case studies of domestic and international companies and not-for-profit organizations will be used to integrate strategic management concepts with knowledge acquired in other classes. This course will include extensive written individual and team assignments and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: MGMT-401, MKTG-102, ACCT-101 and ACCT-102


COMM-310 (Formerly J204) 3-0-3

Communication Theory and Practice
This course is designed to provide viable frameworks in communication and organizational theories and dynamics. Diagnostic criteria and delivery techniques will also be explored, within both theoretical and pragmatic realms. The class will be conducted in an interactive seminar format. 


COMM-320 (Formerly J204)3-0-3

Professional Communication Skills
This General Education Core course requires students to analyze, produce, and revise professional communication in a variety of written, oral, and multi-model formats. Students produce individual and group projects in print and multimedia settings as they explore how economic, social and political perspectives apply to workplace communications, the professions and the professionals themselves.


CSSEM-300 (Formerly J100)3-0-3

Professional Practice Seminar
The introductory core course in Continuing and Professional Studies Bachelor of Science Accelerated Degree Completion Program. Course draws on a variety of sources to provide students the opportunity to create their own conceptual framework regarding their professional and personal experiences and understand how to integrate those frameworks into a personal plan for learning. Students are introduced to the requirements of the Continuing and Professional Studies Portfolio and create the first draft of their personalized portfolio. Required of all CPS majors. 

Prerequisite: Admission to CPS Accelerated Baccalaureate Degree Completion program


CSSEM-499 (Formerly J210)3-0-3

Professional Studies Capstone Seminar
This General Education Core course examines emerging global issues in the areas of politics, economics, technology and the environment; and explores intercultural communication and the cultural dimensions of international business. Students present their final Continuing and Professional Studies Portfolios and analyze a relevant global trend and its expected impact upon their professional field. Required of all CPS Accelerated Bachelor of Science Degree Completion students. 

Prerequisites: Completion of all General Education and Continuing and Professional Studies Core courses, completion of at least 3 electives and completion of at least 3 courses in the major area of study


ECON-331 (Formerly J111)3-0-3

Economic Decision Making
This Continuing and Professional Studies Core course introduces principles underlying the behavior of business firms, resource owners, and consumers within a system of markets. The theory of value and distribution and the implications of international trade on both value and distribution are addressed. Overall purpose of the course is to introduce many of the factors underlying sound economic decision making in the rapidly emerging global economy. There is a strong course focus on critical analysis of cases. 


EMS-3103-0-3

Emergency Services Law
This course explores the essential framework of federal, state and local laws that impact on emergency and public safety services. It will provide an overview of the most important federal and state legislation that impact emergency services management and disasters.


EMS-3203-0-3

Emergency Management Planning
Topics covered in this course include: program planning and management, financial planning, managing information, leadership and followership styles, decision making skills, community building skills, intergovernmental relationships, negotiating and communication skills and professionalism.


EMS-3303-0-3

Public Health Issues Impacting Emergency Services
This course explores the relationship of public health and emergency and disaster prevention, response and recovery environments. Discussions examine the changing and unique role of public health in emergency management paying special attention to epidemiology, integration with traditional emergency services, medical and first responders, public safety, bioterrorism preparedness, and the need for comprehensive pre-education of professional and public communities. The class will cultivate insight into the necessary integration of public health in the development of effective emergency response contingencies specific to natural, accidental and international disaster events.


EMS-4103-0-3

Disaster Response and Recovery Planning
Disasters can be natural, technological, or terrorist in nature; and a pro-active rather than re-active approach to disaster preparation is the best means of mitigating damage. This course covers systematic planning and recovery efforts for when disaster emergencies occur. Students will examine issues in their respective fields and develop strategies for response and recovery methods and techniques from related case studies.


EMS-4993-0-3

Theoretical Applications and Applied Project in Emergency Services Leadership
Students will explore the relevant scholarly literature and then conduct an in-depth analysis of the emergency services industry and design an innovative project. Knowledge of statistical analysis, process planning, and data gathering will be used to complete their analysis and report on a contemporary topic or aspect of the business. Students will demonstrate their ability to assess the efficacy of program design as well as describe the project planning and implementation processes. Student projects are evaluated based on the capacity to incorporate familiarity with systems and planning in a comprehensive project in the context of their subject.

Prerequisites: STAT-311, EMS-310, EMS-320, EMS-330, EMS-410


FINC-323 (Formerly J121) 23-0-3

Financial Decision-Making
A Continuing and Professional Studies Core course that examines financial decision making both from the corporate and individual points of view. While the emphasis is primarily on the corporation, discussions and analysis will be extended, where appropriate, to the individual.

Prerequisite: STAT-311


HIST-232 3-0-3

History and Philosophy of OTA Practice
The history of the OT profession will be described, including founding principles, key figures in the development of the profession, including the founders of OT in the United States and the history of the practice of OT throughout the United States beginning with the Reconstruction Aides. Key dates, events and philosophical underpinnings will be outlined, particularly the move from holism through the rehabilitation movement following World War II and the effect of technology on practice in the US. The OT Practice Framework 2 will be introduced. 

Prerequisite: WRTG-105


HIST-321 (Formerly J201)3-0-3

Business, Industry and Work in American History
This General Education Core course surveys major themes in the history of work in America, focusing on how economic, technological and political changes have transformed the nature of work in America. Course readings explore industrialization, the emergence of mass production and modern management, the history of worker organizations, the decline of manufacturing and rise of a service economy, and the impact of globalization on work in America. Throughout the course, students consider connections between changes in the workplace and broader social and political developments, including changing gender roles and the civil rights movement.


HLTSV-210 (Formerly J125)3-0-3

Ethical Issues for Health and Human Services Providers
This seminar style course is intended to provide tools necessary for considering and discussing ethical dilemmas in today’s multicultural society. Meaningful dialogue requires an understanding of the evolution and development of ethics from the beginning of civilization. Sources used for this course include films and directed readings (text, newspaper articles, and Internet resources). The goal of this course is to enhance the understanding and language skills of the providers so that he/she can engage in meaningful discussions of potentially highly charged emotional issues.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101 or WRTG-105


HLTSV-310 (Formerly J301)3-0-3

Survey of Health Services Delivery Systems
This course provides an overview of the history, evolution and major components of U.S. health care systems. Topics covered include the organization of health care services, the hospital, the roles of health care providers, supply and demand in health care, third-party payers, the role of government and managed care and comparisons of health care systems in other countries.


HLTSV-315 (Formerly J302)3-0-3

Public Policy and Planning in Healthcare
An analysis of the processes related to the planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling of health care services. Specific emphasis is given to the key indicators and organizations that drive policy and planning in health care systems. The course also considers the impact of policy on practitioners in health care. The techniques of effective decision making and problem solving are also addressed.


HLTSV-325 (Formerly J303)3-0-3

Emerging Issues in Healthcare
This course explores the current trends in health care and issues affecting the organizational changes in the industry with regard to delivery of health care services in a wide variety of settings. Topics include history of U.S. health care services, current reform proposals, universal health care insurance, ethical issues, gerontological issues, labor relations, the changing workforce in healthcare, and comparative perspectives of health care in other countries.


HLTSV-499 (Formerly J310)3-0-3

Capstone Seminar in Health Services Management
Students use knowledge of statistical analysis, process planning, and data gathering to complete an in-depth analysis and report on a sector or organization in the health care industry. Students’ projects are evaluated based on demonstration of an understanding of systems, planning and dynamics of delivery in the context of their project.

Prerequisites: HRM-350, HLTSV-310, HLTSV-315 and HLTSV-325


HRM-321 (Formerly J401)3-0-3

Staffing and Resource Development
This course focuses on the recruitment and retention functions of human resource management, including EEO/Affirmative Action and career planning. In addition, the course focuses on the training and development functions inherent in retaining and enhancing a skilled work force. Training development includes needs analysis, programming and evaluation.

Prerequisite: MGMT-320


HRM-336 (Formerly J402)3-0-3

Compensation, Benefits, and Health and Safety
Focusing on the complex structure of employee benefits programs, this course also introduces students to compensation structures. In addition to the focus on compensation and benefits, the course also develops students’ understanding of the legal and organizational aspects of health, safety and security. 

Prerequisite: MGMT-320


HRM-350 (Formerly J132)3-0-3

Cross-Cultural Communication and Diversity Management
This course will examine how to manage the growing multicultural workforce in the United States. Topics include issues of intercultural communication and cross-cultural relations, ethnocentrism, racism and ageism. Students will develop an understanding and appreciation for cultures other than one’s own and will be able to discuss current techniques used in cultural analysis. 


HRM-421 (Formerly J403)3-0-3

Organizational and Employee Relations
This course focuses in part on the function of union representation and collective bargaining in managing a large organization. In addition, it focuses on the role of planning, control, and information resources in the practice of human resource professionals. 

Prerequisite: MGMT-320


HRM-499 (Formerly J410)3-0-3

Applied Research and Practice in Human Resource Management
This project-centered course requires students to develop a comprehensive human resource plan for an organization. Plans must include considerations of planning, staff development, compensation and benefit structures, and organizational health and safety requirements. Students will write and present a comprehensive plan, including materials targeted for employee development and relations.

Prerequisites: HRM-321, HRM-336 and HRM-421


HUMN-3013-0-3

Art and Context 
An in-depth examination of images and objects from throughout history and world cultures. Emphasis will be on the materials and techniques of painting, sculpture, architecture and landscape architecture, and on what these objects and images say about the cultures that made and make them. Class format will be lecture, class discussions and student group presentations. Two self-guided Philadelphia-area field trips will be required.


HUMN-310 (Formerly J202)3-0-3

Globalization and World Politics
This course provides an overview of the forces which are shaping global economics and politics. Students will develop an understanding of the roles of international institutions such as the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund and the United Nations, as well as non-governmental groups. Students will also examine the process of economic globalization in order to understand its varying impacts on different world regions.


IT-101 (Formerly J114)3-0-3

Introduction to Information Systems
This is an introductory course in Continuing and Professional Studies for students with no prior computer experience. The course is designed to teach students to use informatics that combine computer science, information processing, data-base management, word processing, spreadsheets and information presentation skills to facilitate management and processing of industry-related data.


IT-2013-0-3

Learning with Technology
This course will utilize students’ previously acquired abilities to use Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint in conjunction with information retrieval, management and communication tools. Research methods are combined with resource use, leading to careful evaluation and ethical use of information. This course will be taught in a computer lab, combining lecture with hands-on activities and group work. Can complement courses in which the student is concurrently enrolled and that require research beyond the course’s texts.


IT-315 (Formerly J501)3-0-3

Information Technology I
This course prepares future managers to be effective organizers and users of modern information technologies. Emphasizing a global perspective of information technology and related business issues, students learn to view IT in broad terms and function as “internal consultants” to functional areas in an organization. The course covers office and manufacturing automation, telecommunications, decision- support systems and executive information systems. Students learn to integrate the informational needs of the organization with suppliers, customers and other decision-making entities. Course introduces management techniques to support effective employees whose actions are guided by the power of modern information technologies. 


IT-317 (J502)3-0-3

Information Technology II
This course introduces the fundamentals of computer-application development. Students will develop basic facility in digital media, electronic publishing, and decision support systems. The course also includes the use of information technologies for the automation of both office and factory environments.

Prerequisite: IT-315


IT-320 (Formerly J503)3-0-3

Database Management
This course will provide an introduction to the creation and management of electronic databases. Topics covered include database design, relationships, normal forms, structured query language, importing data and creating reports and forms. Data-modeling techniques will also be covered.

Prerequisite: IT-317


IT-410 (Formerly J505)3-0-3

Needs Assessment
This course provides an introduction to assessing the informational needs of an organization. Topics covered include equipment requirements, information design and technology integration as they impact the needs of an organization. Special attention will be given to usability studies and design development.

Prerequisite: IT-320


IT-499 (Formerly J510)3-0-3

Project Management
This course focuses on strategic management of technology projects. Acting as a project manager, students learn techniques to elicit the support and acceptance of new technologies within organizations. Through the creation of a project plan, students learn how to integrate informational technologies into an organization’s mission.

Prerequisite: IT-410


LAWEN-3013-0-3

Planning for Law Enforcement Organizations
This course covers strategic and tactical planning broadly conceived. The focus is on law enforcement, however theories, examples and perspectives will be drawn from other fields in the nonprofit sector. Topics to be addressed include forecasting, personnel planning, GIS, and personnel and resource management issues including budgeting and program evaluation.


LAWEN-3103-0-3

Contemporary Law Enforcement Strategies
Understanding that law enforcement professionals must attain an in-depth understanding of contemporary policing strategies and critical issues facing law enforcement today, students will examine crime analysis, patrol techniques, training, information systems/GIS as well as other issues such as government relations and criminology.


LAWEN-4103-0-3

Advanced Law Enforcement Theory and Management
This course focuses on the underlying theories of expert practices in police management and administration. Students will examine ethical issues specific to the field of law enforcement. This course builds on knowledge obtained through LAWEN-310 and utilizes academic and professional literature to address critical issues in the field.

Prerequisite: LAWEN-310


LAWEN-4993-0-3

Capstone Seminar and Applied Project in Law Enforcement Leadership
Using concepts learned in CPS Core Coursework and Law Enforcement Leadership courses, students conduct an in-depth analysis of the law enforcement industry and design an innovative law enforcement initiative. Students will use knowledge of statistical analysis, process planning and data gathering to complete their analysis and report on a sector or organization in the industry. Students will demonstrate their ability to assess the efficacy of a program design as well as describe the project planning and implementation processes. Students’ projects will be evaluated based on the capacity to incorporate familiarity with systems and planning in a comprehensive project analyzing the dynamics of the law enforcement industry in the context of their project.

Prerequisites: LAWEN-301, LAWEN-310, LAWEN-410, MGMT-320


LHS-350 3-0-3

Fundamentals of Homeland Defense and Security
Overview of the homeland security situation in the post-9/11 era. Students will develop an understanding of factors that affect government efforts to prevent terrorist attacks in the U.S. including terrorist groups, both domestically and globally, organizations involved in Homeland Security, and the challenges and legal issues facing homeland security professionals. Students gain a basic understanding of homeland security principles, national security, and its importance in securing our borders. 


LHS-3603-0-3

Unconventional Conflict
This course provides an introduction and examination of terrorist threats to the United States in the form of unconventional conflict, sabotage, and subversion. Discussions explore the character and history of these threats, as well as examine the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. Individuals, group cells, and large organizations that are engaged in clandestine activity for political purpose or effect are explored. Effective measures for both countering and responding to these terrorism threats are discussed.


LHS-4033-0-3

Critical Infrastructure: Vulnerability Analysis and Protection
This course provides an introduction to the wide variety of threats to critical infrastructure sites and facilities in the United States from both terrorist activities and natural disasters. The importance of these sites to the nation’s overall safety and security is examined, with Local, State, and National icons highlighted. The Department of Homeland Security and it’s concept of an “All Hazards” approach to disasters is explored, with focus on the core principles of Prevent, Prepare, Respond, and Recover.


LHS-4073-0-3

Disaster Policy and Politics
The response to and the planning for disasters and catastrophic events entails complex public policy decisions by local, state, and national political officials. A disaster event can influence many policy agendas, sometimes leading to sweeping changes by public officials that can have long term consequences for society. 

Both recent and historical disasters and their ensuing public policy changes are examined, with a focus on the perception versus the reality of effective legislation.


LHS-4993-0-3

Theoretical Applications and Applied Project in Homeland Security
Students will explore the relevant scholarly literature and then conduct an in-depth analysis of the Homeland Security sector and design an innovative project. Knowledge of statistical analysis, process planning, and data gathering will be used to complete their analysis and report on a contemporary topic or aspect of the sector. Students will demonstrate their ability to assess the efficacy of program design as well as describe the project planning and implementation process. Student projects are evaluated based on the capacity to incorporate familiarity with systems and planning in a comprehensive project in the context of their subject.  

Prerequisites: STAT 311, LHS 350, LHS 360, LHS 403, LHS 407 and EMS 410


MATH-2153-0-3

College Algebra
This course is designed for undergraduate students enrolled in Continuing and Professional Studies programs. Heavy emphasis will be placed on applications and mathematical modeling. Topics covered include those in a traditional College Algebra course. Students will gain knowledge and skills in problem solving and modeling using graphing calculators and computer software. 


MGMT-330 (Formerly J123)3-0-3

Organizational Ethics
This Continuing and Professional Studies  course deals with current controversial issues in organizational ethics. The course will be conducted as a seminar. Students will research specific topics and present this information to other seminar members. 


MGMT-3613-0-3

Leadership Theory and Ethical Practices
This course will heighten awareness and broaden the participant's knowledge of leadership theory, trends and applications, with a strong focus on ethical leadership. The course encompasses leadership/management theories, techniques, organizational applications, managing ethical gray areas with integrity, and integrating leadership skills into daily work practices, Students will review organizational structure/functions, leadership styles, managerial processes, strategic planning, and change-oriented ethical leadership and consider the impact of public policy.


MKTG-320 (Formerly J122)3-0-3

Visual Literacy
A survey course in which students will examine, appreciate and communicate with visual media. Students will enhance their capacity to look at a design and evaluate what is effective, with an understanding of design language and the process by which good communication is created.


OTA-300 4-4-6

Anatomy, Physiology and Biomechanics
This course will examine the anatomical and physiological aspects of the various systems of humans, including integumentary, neurologic, sensory, musculoskeletal, reproductive, circulation, respiration, nutrition-digestion, excretion and endocrine. Biomechanics of muscles, bones, and ligaments of the human body and the interactions between these structures to illustrate how movements are performed will be addressed. Students will be introduced to strategies for adaptation that can lead to improved function in relevant contexts. The OT Practice Framework 2 terminology will be used to describe daily life problem solutions. A close correlation between lecture and laboratory topics will be maintained.

Prerequisite: BIOL-101


OTA-302 3-2-3

Occupations Across the Lifespan: Infancy Through Adolescence
The course will focus on the observations, analysis, and performance of human occupations in work, self-care and play/leisure from infancy through adolescence. The teaching-learning process will be incorporated, with an emphasis on self-directed learning by doing. The OT Practice Framework 2 terminology will be used to describe observations and findings. This course includes a graded offsite fieldwork component to complement academic teaching content.

Prerequisite: HIST-232


OTA-304 3-2-3

Occupations Across the Lifespan: Adulthood
The course will focus on the observations, analysis, and performance of human occupations in work, self-care and play/leisure from late adolescence through the elder years. The teaching-learning process will be incorporated, with an emphasis on self-directed learning by doing. The OT Practice Framework 2 terminology will be used to describe observations and findings.

Prerequisite: OTA-302


OTA-3063-2-3

Conditions I: Infancy through Adolescence
The etiology and symptoms of clinical conditions that are commonly referred for occupational therapy services are examined. The effects of trauma and disease on the biological, psychological, and social domains of occupational behavior are introduced, with particular emphasis on conditions usually experienced from infancy through adolescence. Procedures and precautions ensuring safety for patients and caregivers will be reviewed. 

PREREQUISITES: PSYCH-101 Introduction to Psychology

OTA-300 Anatomy, Physiology and Biomechanics


OTA-3083-1-3

Conditions II: Adulthood 
The etiology and symptoms of clinical conditions that are commonly referred for occupational therapy services are examined. The effects of trauma and disease on the biological, psychological, and social domains of occupational behavior are introduced, with particular emphasis on conditions usually experienced from early adulthood through aging. Procedures and precautions ensuring safety for patients and caregivers will be reviewed. Students will be introduced to the resources available for keeping current as new protocols and best practices develop.

Prerequisites: OTA-306 Conditions I: Infancy through Adolescence


OTA-3103-0-3

Environments and Contexts of Occupation 
Environments and contexts can have an enormous effect on occupational therapy intervention. Across all practice areas, occupational therapy intervention uses environments and contexts to support the client’s/patient’s health and participation in meaningful occupations. This course focuses on understanding the complex nature of contexts and environments and their impact on engagement in occupations across the life span. 

Prerequisites: OTA 304: Occupations Across the Lifespan-Adulthood


OTA-4003-0-3

Leadership and Human Service Systems
Basic management skills and abilities required as a COTA in occupational therapy and other programs will be defined and analyzed. The student will explore topics associated with health care delivery systems, including contextual factors, federal and state regulations, reimbursement systems, and credentialing laws. Skills in management will be reviewed, including organizing and maintaining workload, marketing services, documentation in its various forms, and supervision of aides and developing skills as a fieldwork educator. Ethical and professional principles will be defined in the context of a variety of employment and intervention settings, with an emphasis on applying AOTA’s Code of Ethics to different situations.

Prerequisite: HIST 232 History and Philosophy of OTA Practice


OTA-4022-0-2

Ethics and Critical Thinking I
Students will examine the AOTA Code of Ethics in-depth and then use it and the AOTA Occupational Therapy Practice Framework 2 to analyze case studies and examples from fieldwork to further their understanding of liability issues, ethical dilemmas, and decision-making in professional interactions, client interventions, and employment settings.

Pre-requisite: Ethics and Critical Thinking I

Co-Prerequisite: Fieldwork II A


OTA-4041-0-1

Ethics and Critical Thinking II
Clinical reasoning, ethical principles, and understanding the values of the profession are defined. The student will discuss and describe the value of local, state, and national professional OT organizations, the importance of promoting the profession and developing a personal professional development plan, and recognizing personal strengths and areas for improvement. Students will demonstrate their critical thinking and overall knowledge acquisition by presenting their summative OTA Program Portfolio in conjunction with this course.

Pre-requisite: Ethics and Critical Thinking I

Co-Prerequisite: Fieldwork II B


OTA-4062-6-6

Fieldwork Level II A
Minimum eight weeks and 300 hours supervised experience. Students apply and integrate didactic knowledge and skills with clients in a variety of settings under the supervision of a registered and licensed occupational therapist. Students are assigned to facility and community settings and receive practical experience applying knowledge and skills with individuals of varying ages and conditions. Prior to enrolling, students must successfully complete all required OTA courses, demonstrate current CPR certification, and receive departmental approval. 

Pre-requisites: IT 201, OTA 310, MATH 215, OTA 400,
OTA 414 – Interventions III: Late Adulthood.
Co-Prerequisite: OTA 402 Ethics and Critical Thinking I


OTA-408

2-6-6

Fieldwork Level II B
Minimum eight weeks and 300 hours supervised experience. Students apply and integrate didactic knowledge and skills with clients in a variety of settings under the supervision of a registered and licensed occupational therapist. Students are assigned to facility and community settings and receive practical experience applying knowledge and skills with individuals of varying ages and conditions. Prior to enrolling, students must successfully complete all required OTA courses, demonstrate current CPR certification, and receive departmental approval. 

Pre-requisite: OTA-406 Fieldwork II A
Co-Prerequisite: OTA 404 Ethics and Critical Thinking II


OTA-4103-3-4

Interventions I: Infancy through Adolescence
Through analysis and simulation of occupations, OTA students gain insight and skill in observation, assessment, documentation, and teaching of adapted self-care, work and play/leisure activities for the person with life challenges from infancy through adolescence. Conditions commonly occurring in this age group will be reviewed. The dynamics of group and individual participation in occupations are explored as they relate to assessment and therapeutic intervention.

Pre-requisite: OTA-302 Occupations across the 
Lifespan I: Infancy through Adolescence and 
OTA-306 Conditions I: Infancy through Adolescence.


OTA-4123 credits

Interventions II: Young through Middle Adulthood
Through analysis and simulation of occupations, students gain insight and skill in observation, assessment, documentation, and teaching of adapted self-care, work and play/leisure activities for the person with life challenges from young through middle adulthood. Conditions commonly occurring in this age group are reviewed. The course includes laboratory and directed offsite fieldwork components to complement lecture content.

Pre-requisite: OTA 410 Interventions I: Infancy through Adolescence; OTA 304 Occupations Across the Lifespan II: Adulthood;OTA 308 Conditions II: Adulthood


OTA-4143-3-4

Interventions III: Late Adulthood
Through analysis and simulation of occupations, the students gain insight and skills in observation, assessment, documentation, and teaching of adaptive self-care, work, and play/leisure activities for the person with life challenges in late adulthood. Conditions commonly occurring in this age group will be reviewed. This course includes laboratory and directed offsite fieldwork components to complement lecture content.

Pre-requisite: OTA-412 Interventions II: Young through Middle Adulthood


PSYCH-222ACC3-0-3

Counseling Psychology: Theories and Principles
This course provides an overview and general understanding of the field of counseling psychology. The course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, interventions, scientific research, professional practices and contemporary issues of the profession of counseling psychology. Students will learn a variety of theoretical approaches and psychotherapy techniques to counseling, including psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive and humanistic approaches. The course contains both didactic and skill application to encourage competency in the performance of counseling skills. 

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


SOC-310 (Formerly J203) 3-0-3

Social Science of the Workplace
This General Education Core course examines the contemporary world of work using analytic tools from a variety of disciplines, including sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Key themes include: the social organization of work, contemporary changes in occupations and professions, technology and the information age, the impact of globalization on work, the role of class, gender, race and ethnicity in shaping work experiences and worker identities, and the relationship between work and family. Students learn about basic social science research techniques, practice interpreting data and thinking critically about contemporary work issues, and develop their own arguments about the world of work.


STAT-311 (Formerly J112)3-0-3

Finding and Evaluating Statistical Data
A Continuing and Professional Studies Core course in data gathering and analysis, focusing on the use of demographic and economic data that inform organizational decision making. Students will learn basic descriptive statistical measures and probability theory and develop an understanding of the basis for statistical decision-making techniques. A variety of resources for gathering data related to demographics, socio-economic and socio-geographic trends, economics data, and trends in business and industry will be presented. Students will also review and apply a variety of descriptive and/or inferential statistics to make meaning of these data. Students will learn to manipulate data using statistical software. 


WRTG-1053-0-3

Writing About Workplace Culture
Students in this thematic writing-specific course draw evidence from multiple sources while developing thesis-driven essays and other types of personal, academic and professional writing. To examine the purposely broad theme of workplace culture, students will research, write, and present on topics such as professional ethics, the multicultural workplace, technology on the job, workplace politics, and corporate citizenship. Students will also develop targeted information literacy skills and enhance their abilities to think independently and on teams.