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Graduate Course Descriptions

CADF CAD Foundation CMW Midwifery
DMM Disaster Medicine and Management FAS Fashion Apparel Studies
GFE Global Fashion Enterprise GEOD GeoDesign
IARCP Interior Architecture Preparatory IARC Interior Architecture
IDF Industrial Design Foundation IDD Interactive Design and Media
iMBAX Innovation Master of Business Administration Online iMBA Innovation Master of Business Administration
iMBF Innovation Master of Business Foundation MCM Master of Construction Management
MSID M.S. in Industrial Design MMW Midwifery
PAS Physician Assistant Studies OCC Occupational Therapy
SDN Sustainable Design PASF Physician Assistant Studies Foundation
TAX Tax SDNF Sustainable Design Foundation
TXD Textile Design TES Textile Engineering, PhD.
TXF Textile Design Foundation TXE Textile Engineering, M.S.

 


CADF-5003 credits

CAD I for Industrial Design

The course introduces students to computer-aided design with a focus on the industrial design processes. In an intuitive fashion, students create and refine designs using a solids-modeling software package. In order to recognize the critical role CAD plays in the development of designs, students will use designs created in design studio courses as the subject matter of the CAD activities. Design-control drawings, three-dimensional rendered drawings and perspective drawings will be the course’s output. 


CADF-5013 credits

CAD II: Interactive Design and Media Techniques

This course will build upon principles introduced in introductory CAD courses. It is primarily a laboratory course in which students will learn to take their early design concepts through to the final presentation using advanced digital design techniques. Students will use multiple digital design software packages across computer platforms with an emphasis on CAID packages such as NURBS modelers and animation software, as well as vector-based, desktop-publishing programs and bitmap-based programs.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in CAD-206 or permission of the instructor


CMW-6020.5 credits

Interviewing and Counseling

This is an on-campus intensive course focusing on the skills a midwife requires to successfully communicate with clients. This course will develop basic interviewing and counseling skills that build trust and demonstrate respect for women. Theory and practice of skills for interviewing and counseling women in all aspects of women’s health care are offered.


CMW-6043 credits

Advanced Anatomy and Physiology

This course focuses on the structure of the human body and its mechanical, physical, and biochemical processes. Anatomical and physiological principles necessary for health care professionals are presented. Normal and abnormal structures and processes underlying health and disease are presented with connections made to assessment and diagnosis in the clinical setting. 


CMW-6052 credits

Professional Issues

This course is designed to provide an appreciation of the history and critical issues in midwifery, as well as the health care field in general. This course will also increase appreciation of the variety of roles that a midwife can play and aid in understanding rights and responsibilities as a midwifery health care provider.


CMW-6062 credits

Health and Lifestyles

This course provides an overview of health promotion and public health concepts. The construct of wellness is explored. Lifestyle, relationships, and cultural competence are examined within the context of our own lives and midwifery practice.


CMW-6074 credits

Healthcare of Women I

This course presents basic principles and application of well-woman care across the life span. Sexuality, menstrual cycle function/dysfunction, common gynecological conditions, family planning and health care promotion are common threads in this course. Students receive information on physiology, health screening and midwifery management of common primary care conditions.


CMW-6104 credits

Antepartum Care

This course examines the fundamentals of prenatal care, including the components of prenatal care, criteria for assessing perinatal outcomes and the application of the midwifery management process in the antepartum period. Theoretical foundations for diagnosis and dating of pregnancy, common discomforts of pregnancy, assessment of pelvic adequacy and assessment of fetal well-being and nutrition in pregnancy are covered in depth.


CMW-6114 credits

Intrapartum Care

This course teaches the principles of midwifery for the laboring woman and her family, correlating physiologic processes to the maternal and fetal experiences of labor and birth. Concepts of normal birth and its variations lead to thoughtful analysis of management options.


CMW-6131 credit

This course teaches the principles of midwifery for the laboring woman and her family, correlating physiologic processes to the maternal and fetal experiences of labor and birth. Concepts of normal birth and its variations lead to thoughtful analysis of management options.


CMW-6122.5 credits

Postpartum/Newborn Care

This course develops the knowledge base for assessing the physical and emotional changes of the postpartum period, breastfeeding, early attachment and parenting behaviors. It provides the knowledge base for understanding the physiology of transition to extrauterine life and early newborn adaptations. Assessments for newborn health, gestational age and attachment behaviors are included.


CMW-6131 credit

Embryology and Genetics

This hybrid distance and on-campus course will cover basic concepts of genetics, including inheritance and genetic disorders. Concepts of embryology will include fertilization, implantation and the embryonic period.


CMW-6194 credits

Perinatal Complications

This course examines the fundamentals of perinatal care of complex client(s) in the antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and newborn periods. Students will utilize course materials to simulate and problem-solve written cases in a virtual midwifery practice. Midwifery management discussions and peer review will include a variety of topics of frequently seen complications in the perinatal period.


CMW-6202 credits

Healthcare of Women II

This course examines the fundamentals of perinatal care of complex client(s) in the antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and newborn periods. Students will utilize course materials to simulate and problem-solve written cases in a virtual midwifery practice. Midwifery management discussions and peer review will include a variety of topics of frequently seen complications in the perinatal period.


CMW-6312 credits

Maternity and Well Woman Care 1

The course consists of supervised clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well-woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception. Students learn consistent and accurate use of the midwifery management process with emphasis on subjective and objective data collection and beginning assessment and plan development. An on-campus skills workshop prepares students for this clinical course and includes risk assessment, development of a needs assessment and problem list, and pertinent hand skills. Additionally, history taking and physical assessment will be reviewed and demonstrated. Microscopy skills will be introduced. Contraceptive techniques will be reviewed.

Prerequisite is successful completion of CMW-641 or permission of the program director.


CMW-6323 credits

Maternity and Well Woman Care 2

The course consists of supervised clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well-woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception. Students are expected to continue to demonstrate consistent and accurate use of the midwifery management process with emphasis on independent development of an assessment, plan for, and evaluation of, care. This course is three credits and consists completely of continued clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception. The prerequisite is successful completion of CMW631, Clinical I.

Prerequisite is successful completion of CMW-631 or permission of the program director.


CMW-6334 credits

Full Scope Midwifery Care 1

The course consists of supervised clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well-woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception. Students are expected to continue to demonstrate consistent and accurate use of the midwifery management process with emphasis on independent development of an assessment, plan for, and evaluation of, care. This course is three credits and consists completely of continued clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception.

Prerequisite is successful completion of CMW-640 or permission of the program director.


CMW-6345 credits

Full Scope Midwifery Care 2

The course consists of supervised clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well-woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception. Students are expected to continue to demonstrate consistent and accurate use of the midwifery management process with emphasis on independent development of an assessment, plan for, and evaluation of, care. This course is three credits and consists completely of continued clinical practice in the midwifery management of uncomplicated antepartum and well woman clients needing routine primary care, care for common gynecologic problems and contraception.

Prerequisite is successful completion of CMW-633 or permission of the program director.


CMW-6353 credits

Basic Skills in Health Care

This course is an introduction to common health care skills and knowledge used in clinical practice. Presentation of self as care provider to diverse clientele with respect for human rights is emphasized. Contents include but are not limited to vital sign measurement and interpretation, infection control, sterile technique, wound care, urinary catheterization, venipuncture, fetal and uterine external monitoring application, emergency response procedures, therapeutic presence and communication, and skills in team building and patient advocacy. Medical terminology, written and electronic medical records and basic laboratory assessments will be reviewed. Practice and successful return demonstration of selected skills will be done at the student’s first on campus experience after completion of this course.


CMW-635L3 credits

Basic Skills in Health Care Lab

During this one week on-campus intensive laboratory course, students review, practice and demonstrate selected basic health care skills for midwifery practice such as vital sign measurement, sterile technique, bladder catheterization, medical terminology, documentation of care and presentation of self as a clinician with faculty guidance and feedback for skill development. Students in this laboratory course participate in hands-on practice using task trainers and simulated patient care scenarios to build beginning competency. 


CMW-6363 credits

Environments of Health Care

The effects of various environments of care on social dynamics between health care providers and patients will be explored. Theories of stress and coping and shared leadership will be addressed. Environments examined will include: home, office/clinic, hospital/health care institution, and care in place – disaster/emergency care. Available resources in each environment and the evidence supporting their use or misuse will be discussed. Observational clinical experiences in a variety of environments will be described and analyzed via reflective journals and asynchronous seminar discussion. Midwifery role and scope of practice in the various environments will be highlighted. Identifying local health care providers and resources for future practice referrals situates midwifery care in a system which provides for needs of women and their families ranging from simple to complex.


CMW-6373 credits

Health and Illness in Clinical Practice

This course will examine concepts of health and illness at various stages of human development. The midwifery model of care and the midwifery management process will be introduced as frameworks guiding care practices. Wellness care and complementary integrated approaches will be discussed. Selected common health alterations at every life phase will be explored, with emphasis on the midwife’s role for independent or collaborative management or referral. The plan of care for these clients – including further testing or assessment, therapeutics and educational needs - will be examined. Problem based learning scenarios will serve as the stimulus for identifying learning needs and developing midwifery care strategies.


CMW-6382.5 credits

Advanced Pharmacology I

This course is a comprehensive course in pharmacology for women’s health care. The language of pharmacology and the principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics serve as the foundation for the course. Major classifications of agents that are covered in the course include: hormones, antimicrobials, analgesia and anesthesia, over-the-counter drugs. Prescriptive writing, including legal and ethical aspects, is also covered as well.


CMW-6390.5 credit

Advanced Pharmacology II

This course is second in a two-part series in pharmacology for women’s health care. Concepts and issues in drug prescription for pregnant women and their newborns are presented. Changes in pharmacodynamics and pharmcokinetics during pregnancy are reviewed. Major classifications of agents covered in the course include: vitamins and minerals; uterotonins/uterotropins; and drugs administered to newborns.


CMW-6401 credit

Preparation for Full Scope Midwifery Practice 

This on-campus course explores issues in midwifery practice including: the role, rights and responsibilities of the midwife in the clinical practice setting; the legal, ethical and financial realities of professional midwifery practice; alternatives in full scope midwifery care with examples from experts; and environments of midwifery care including home, hospital and birth center settings. Students take a closer look at one birth center model of childbearing care by spending time on site. Content covered in this visit includes: 1) the history, philosophy and development of the birth center movement in the United States and 2) the accreditation and needs assessment process. 


CMW-6411 credit

Preparation for Office-Based Practice

This on-campus intensive course focuses on building the office-based clinical skills a midwife requires to successfully communicate with and care for clients. Clinical decision making and use of the midwifery management process is emphasized. Hand skills, as-well-as interviewing and counseling skills, are reinforced through workshops and during clinical simulations. Clinical microscopy and laboratory result interpretation are practiced. Skills for building trust and demonstrating respect for clients are woven throughout. Expectations for clinical rotations are reviewed.


CMW-6423 credits

Professional Issues

This course is designed to provide an appreciation of the history and critical issues in midwifery, as well as health care in the United States in general. This course will also increase appreciation of the variety of roles that a midwife can play and aid in understanding rights and responsibilities as a midwifery health care provider.


CMW-6433 credits

Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology for Primary Care

This online course focuses on human physiology and pathophysiology and the application of these principles in the primary care of women. Anatomical and physiological principles necessary for health care professionals are reviewed. Normal and abnormal structures and processes underlying health and disease are explored with connections made to assessment and diagnosis in the clinical setting. Midwifery management of common primary care conditions across the health span is presented and explored.


CMW-6441.5 credits

Advanced Pharmacology II

Advanced Pharmacology II prepares the midwife to provide appropriate drug therapy to women during pregnancy, intrapartum, and the postpartum period as well as to the newborn. Changes in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and in the neonatal period are reviewed. A general knowledge of pharmacotherapeutics is applied to the treatment of a variety of conditions during pregnancy, including hyperemesis, gestational diabetes, and urinary tract infections. The course also explores the use of vitamin and mineral supplementation throughout a woman's lifetime.


CMW-6454 credits

Healthcare of Women

This course presents principles and application of women’s gynecologic health care. Reproductive physiology is studied in depth. Health promotion is emphasized. Well-woman gynecology including family planning and common gynecologic conditions are explored. The course then addresses more complex assessment and diagnosis of anomalies; alterations and tumors of the reproductive tract; sexual dysfunction and infertility; menstrual cycle disturbances and ectopic pregnancy; infections of the reproductive tract; and selected multiple systems medical problems and their effects on women’s health.


CMW-6993 credits

Advanced Physical Assessment

This course is designed for the individual preparing to begin a nurse-midwifery program of study. Midwives are often a woman’s first contact with the health care system. Women seek care from midwives not only during the childbearing cycle, but for family planning and well woman health care throughout the adult life cycle. As primary care providers for women, nurse-midwives will use these skills of clinical assessment daily. At the completion of this course the student will have the knowledge and skills in physical assessment of the adult female to provide clinical services at a beginning level.


DMM-6113 credits

Principles of Disaster Medicine and Management

This course provides students with a general overview of disaster events and covers the key components of disaster prevention, risk assessment and disaster management including: types of disasters, phases of disasters (preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery), agencies involved in disaster situations, public service disruptions, mass casualty triage, human resource issues, media relations, ethical considerations, communications and incident command systems.


DMM-6123 credits

Foundations of Homeland Security and Defense

The US has embraced the homeland security monolith having neither fully understood nor tamed all that it encompasses. This challenging course provides a broad overview of homeland security and homeland defense as undertaken in the United States since 9/11. The goal is to provide the generally accepted body of knowledge required of the homeland security professional. The course focuses on four areas: the enemy, animosity and potential outcomes of threats posed; the policies and procedures enacted since 9/11; federal, state and local governmental roles; and legal issues critical to the conduct of homeland security and defense activities by the military including the National Guard. The student will gain an understanding in asymmetric thinking, develop an appreciation for the growing body of literature in the discipline of homeland security, and have the opportunity to examine a key issue in depth through a term research paper.


DMM-6133 credits

International and Humanitarian Disaster Management

International and humanitarian disaster management has steadily evolved over decades. The increased emphasis on global disaster preparedness from both governmental and private sectors has widespread application across all borders. Through the exploration of disaster models, public health principles, economic, social and political elements, students will explore the application of the disaster cycle.

Prerequisite: DMM611, 643 or permission of the instructor


DMM-6153 credits

Hazardous Materials & Industrial Safety

This course provides an overview of the major hazardous materials commonly encountered and their effects on humans and wildlife. Industrial waste, pollution, nuclear waste, hazardous waste transportation and the management of hazardous material accidents are all covered.


DMM-6173 credits

GIS in Emergency Management

This course will provide students with an introduction into geographic information systems by infusing it into emergency management. The class will focus on the 3 major elements:
1) Fundamentals of GIS,
2) Knowledge of GIS software and the
3) Understanding of the spatiality in emergency management situations.


DMM-6193 credits

Natural Disasters

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the various types of natural disasters which plague the world. The student will study the forces of nature which cause these events to occur, the population effects of the event itself and the dynamic nature by which the event spawns further cataclysmic change in our environment.


DMM-6233 credits

Weapons of Mass Destruction

This course introduces students to the various types of biologic, chemical and nuclear/radiologic weapons, along with the clinical manifestations and management of exposure to these. Decontamination and institutional procedures for weapons of mass destruction incident management are also covered.


DMM-6243 credits

Organizational Risk and Crisis Management

This course examines key concepts in the understanding and management of risk in an organizational environment. Aspects of risk evolution, tools and techniques, project vulnerabilities, uncertainty, modeling and risk software are included.


DMM-6253 credits

Business Continuity – Planning for a Crisis

The course explores the issues in maintaining a business in the midst of crisis and the disruption of resources. It includes planning for, responding to, and recovering from an internal or external crisis in the organization.


DMM-6263 credits

Organizational Recovery and Planning

This course discusses business and organizational implications of the disaster recovery lessons taught by 9/11, the California energy crisis, the anthrax scare and other related disastrous events as they relate to emergency decision making and planning. Special emphasis is directed toward infrastructure and IT/IS implications of process continuation.


DMM-6273 credits

Principles of Terrorism

The types of terrorism, along with the social, political and psychological motivations and ramifications of terrorism are the focus of this course. Threat risk assessment and prevention strategies are also components.


DMM-6313 credits

Organizational Management and Communication in Disasters

This course introduces students to theories of organizational dynamics and management as it pertains to crisis and disaster situations. The course also explores communication within the organization, with external agencies, and with the public and media during and after disaster events.

Prerequisite: DMM611


DMM-6353 credits

Psychological Aspects of Disasters

This course explores the psychological sequelae of disasters and traumatic events including acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. The clinical presentation, assessment and management of these disorders are discussed. Clinical interventions such as post-event debriefing, short-term counseling and mental health referral in disaster situations are also covered.

This course includes an intensive on-campus experience. Offered in summer only.


DMM-6393 credits

Principles of Disaster Exercises & Drills

This course will prepare students to develop and implement effective emergency disaster drills and tabletop exercises. It will also encompass the principles of mass casualty triage. The principles of adult learning and educational assessment are also covered. This course includes an intensive on-campus experience. Offered in summer only.

Prerequisite: DMM611


DMM-6433 credits

Public Health Implications of Disasters

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the concepts of public health as they relate to disaster management. The student will apply Noji’s five phases of a disaster to actual disaster events during the last 25 years and will focus especially on what preparedness actions are necessary to safeguard the health of citizens and emergency personnel during a disaster event. Public health issues in disaster management that are covered include water and food supply disruption and contamination, waste disposal, environmental pollution and infectious disease outbreaks. The basic principles of epidemiology and health surveillance are also reviewed.


DMM-6473 credits

Disaster Emergency Planning

This course encompasses the major aspects of a comprehensive disaster plan including: physical resources, human resource considerations, interagency interaction, communication, incident command systems, evacuation of injured, crowd control, traffic management, hospital capacity, decontamination, material management logistics, media relations, mortuary services, survivor and rescuer grief counseling, and exercises.

Prerequisite: DMM611


DMM-6483 credits

Emergency Preparedness for Special Needs Population

The term “special needs” is widely used within the disaster services and the emergency management world. It generally refers to an extremely broad group of people with physical disabilities, people with serious mental illness, pregnant women, children, and the elderly. These groups represent a large and complex variety of concerns and challenges. Many of these groups have little in common beyond the fact that they are often left out of programs, services, and emergency planning.

This course will introduce students to planning, responding, mitigating, and recovering from a disaster as it pertains to the special needs population. This will include specific functional roles, resource identification and response of personnel involved in disaster management. Students will be presented with problem based learning assignments and based on the assigned readings, research, and personal experiences, they will be able to analyze and apply the theories and principals pertaining to the response and recovery of an event to these special populations.


DMM-6493 credits

Healthcare Emergency Management

Healthcare emergency management has steadily evolved over decades but at an increased rate since September 11, 2001. The increased emphasis on disaster preparedness from both the public as well as regulatory agencies now requires a level of knowledge beyond the technical level. This course is designed to provide a foundation in hospital emergency preparedness. 


DMM-6513 credits

Applied Research Methods & Statistics

Basic statistics and research methods used in the medical and social sciences are covered in this course. Students will have the opportunity to review current medical research and evaluate it with regard to its application to practice.


DMM-6533 credits

Clinical Disaster Medicine

This course is designed to expose the student to the clinical aspects of disaster medicine by encouraging exploration of the roles of healthcare providers in disasters, the study of clinical situations that occur during disasters, analysis of public, occupational, and environmental health issues, and applying clinical research and epidemiology concepts.

Prerequisites: DMM611


DMM-7553 credits

Capstone Experience in Disaster Medicine and Management

In this capstone experience students will complete either an: original research project; an original disaster plan; a systematic review paper on a disaster-related topic with thorough literature search, analysis and compilation; or an internship with disaster plan. All of these will involve a thorough literature search, an analysis of the current research, integration of multiple facets of disaster medicine and management and completion of a substantial written product.

Prerequisites: DMM611, DMM631, DMM647, DMM651


DMM-7913 credits

Internship in Disaster Medicine and Management

This experience is an optional internship in disaster medicine or management at an agency involved in disaster preparedness or response. This may include international experiences when available.
Prerequisites: DMM611, DMM631, DMM647 Requirements may apply; see program director or Office of Career Services for details. 


DMM-7971-3 credits

Special Topics in Disaster Medicine and Management

This course provides an opportunity to explore topics in disaster medicine and management not developed in other courses. Examples include recent complex humanitarian emergencies, disasters, or catastrophes, new practice technology, essential health policy changes, new research findings, and other cutting edge materials. Students may take this course more than once as the topics differ each time it is offered.


FAS-7633 credits

Research Project

This course is a capstone course for Fashion Apparel Studies. The student, with the consent of the instructor, will perform self-directed research in an appropriate area of interest within an apparel company. The student will investigate, document and then analyze how their research findings affect the operation of the individual company, its suppliers, and its customers. Finally, the student will recommend changes that will improve the performance of the company and the other members of the supply chain.

Prerequisite: MBA-762


FAS-7903 credits

Textile and Apparel Business Policy and Strategic Planning in a Global Environment

This course will study the textile and apparel business in a highly competitive and complex environment. Consideration will be given to the changing demands of the marketplace and consumers, and the external forces that can impact a company’s performance, many of which are beyond management’s control. The process and techniques of strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation are studied. The course will include lectures, workshops, case studies and assignments.


FAS-9232 credits

Thesis Preparation

This course will study the textile and apparel business in a highly competitive and complex environment. Consideration will be given to the changing demands of the marketplace and consumers, and the external forces that can impact a company’s performance, many of which are beyond management’s control. The process and techniques of strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation are studied. The course will include lectures, workshops, case studies and assignments.


FAS-9414 credits

Project Thesis

The thesis should be the result of original investigation of relevant literature in the field of apparel and/or retail. The thesis should exemplify original scholarship and critical judgment while examining a topic in depth. A successful thesis will demonstrate the student’s abilities in collecting and evaluating information, critically examining existing theories and then constructing testing and defending a coherent argument. The thesis must be organized, demonstrate clarity of purpose, reveal evidence of critical analysis, and include complete and accurate citations and documentation for all sources.

Since the thesis is the culmination of rigorous preparation as developed in Thesis Preparation and should only be attempted in the final semester of the program. In consultation with the Thesis Committee Chair and its members, the student will complete the writing of the thesis according to the University Guide for the preparation of Doctoral Dissertations and Master’s Thesis December 2007 that was begun in FAS923 Thesis Preparation.

The thesis must be a minimum of 40-50 pages in length, not including figures, tables and graphs using the most current Philadelphia University Guide For The Preparation Of Doctoral Dissertation And Master’s Theses document. Thesis guidelines available at www.philau.edu/gradstudent
Prerequisite: FAS923 Thesis Preparation


GEOD-5002-2-3

Introduction to GIS

This course is an introductory course for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and is a prerequisite for those in the M.S. in GeoDesign Program that do not have prior GIS training. GIS is a computer-based tool that uses spatial (geographic) data to analyze and solve real-world problems. Specific GIS methods and topics covered include cartography, demographics, site selection, transportation studies, land use scenarios, and environmental applications. This is a foundation course for the M.S. in GeoDesign Program.


GEOD-6001-4-3

GeoDesign Studio I

GeoDesign is a planning and design process that is based on physical and biological information, references social and economic information and is holistic and interdisciplinary. In this introductory GeoDesign studio, students will form collaborative teams and work with a client/partner to solve a real urban geospatial design problem. Various GeoDesign techniques, digital technologies and scenario management tools will be introduced and applied.


GEOD-6152-2-3

Advanced GIS/Geospatial Analysis I (Fall)

This is an advanced course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and an introductory course in GeoDesign. Students continue their studies in GIS applications and apply them to GeoDesign projects. GeoDesign is an increasingly important integrative design and technology based process for urban design, site design, recreation master planning, visual analysis, comprehensive planning, resource management and public advocacy. Prerequisite: GIS experience/coursework


GEOD-6213-0-3

Environmental Policy (Fall)

Environmental problems are essentially social, economic and political problems. This course initially traces the evolution of United States environmental policy, legislation and regulations, including the background and context of environmental policymaking; the substantive problems and political process of environmental movements; and contemporary environmental thought with regard to issues of sustainability and environmental justice.


GEOD-6XX2-8-6

GeoDesign Studio II

In this intermediate design studio, students will form collaborative teams and apply geospatial analysis techniques and information modeling to a more complex urban design problem. Students will work cooperatively with the community client/partner throughout the design process. Community members will be instructed how to use one or more geospatial tools in the decision-making process.


GEOD-6xx2-2-3

Geospatial Analysis II

This advance geospatial course will focus on analysis and modeling of urban structure and dynamics. Geospatial analysis and modeling have become important and indispensable tools for understanding urban infrastructure and dynamics. Exercises will include simulating and modeling urban transportation systems, analyzing and modeling urban growth, and predicting urban changes and impacts.


GEOD-6xx2-2-3

Information Modeling

Geospatial data will be used as the context basis for building information modeling (BIM), which is an integrated process for digitally exploring, defining and optimizing a project's physical and financial characteristics during design and management. The scales of building, campus, neighborhood, city and region will be studied. Principles of GeoDesign, integrated projected delivery and lean design will be discussed in relation to this process.


GEOD-6xx2-8-6

Applied Research Studio

In this culminating studio, students will work individually or in small groups to on an applied research project that developed through a previous GeoDesign design studio, a technology course, or from an outside source. The applied research outcomes will then be utilized and tested as part of a community outreach design project.


GEOD-6xx2-2-3

GeoDesign Explorations

Extensive and high-quality geographic data sources are important for any kind of spatial analysis or application, especially in the field of urban data management. In this seminar course cutting-edge and exploratory geospatial techniques and applications will be examined. For example, robotics allows for spatial data collection within buildings but how can the technology be applied to exterior urban spaces? The theory behind gamification is that users are more likely to adopt (and actively use) an application when there is an aspect of game play associated with it. How does GeoDesign make the best use of gamification techniques/tools?


GFE-5013 credits

Garment Development

Students will have a basic understanding of garment construction combined with flat-pattern concepts. The use of industrial equipment and basic slopers will be utilized to produce a sample book of construction details and garments.


GFE-5053 credits

Apparel Production

Basic operations in all segments of an apparel plant are studied from the initial receipt of raw materials through storage, inspection, marker making, spreading, cutting, sewing, pressing, warehousing, shipping and customer returns. Latest technological advances in each of these areas will be discussed with marker making performed on a Gerber Accumark 300 System. Inventory management, labor issues, ergonomics and relevant public policies are also studied.
Prerequisites: FASHMGT 101 and FASHMGT 201


GFE-6003 credits

Fashion Immersion

This course introduces students at a graduate level to the global fashion industry, with a particular focus on benchmarking successful organizational strategies. The course integrates textile functionalities, usages, design concepts, and apparel manufacturing. Students visit US fashion houses and participate in experientially focused workshops. Students will evaluate fashion strategies, from both the technical and business perspectives, and examine the conceptual frameworks and core disciplines within the Global Fashion Enterprise curriculum. 


GFE-6113 credits

Product Devel/Entrepreneurship

In the development of any apparel product, attention must be given to form, function, fit and appearance and to their interrelationship. Form involves the influence of preference and individual choices. Function includes such aspects as “fitness for use,” taking into account levels of activity, gender and age. Account must also be taken of the influence of markets, as well as the opportunities and constraints presented by design, cost and manufacturing systems. At the managerial level, the individual is faced with constant change from original concept to the end product. Multiple adjustments to the product arise at every phase requiring tremendous ingenuity and problem-solving skills. Graduates will be faced with this kind of process in the apparel industry and need to manage and follow through with the development of a product.


GFE-6123 credits

Technology in Fashion

This course aims at showing that state-of-the-art technology in a given field has become an essential component for strategic leadership, profitability and stable employment. The point is made by providing a broad perspective on the major technical advances experienced by the apparel industry from the 1980s and their positive impact on the national industries where they originated and/or were adopted. Analysis of the difficulties met by high-wage countries failing to follow that course helps to reinforce the point. Review of the factors accounting for these advances brings out the critical importance of technology transfer and fusion in the formulation and development of basic concepts. Detailing both processes offers the opportunity to introduce the notion of systemic thinking and its growing influence on management style. It is intended that the student will gain a global perspective of the textile and apparel business and of the growing role played by advanced technology and its impact on finances and personnel.


GFE-6213 credits

Global Fashion Mktg & Sourcing

U.S. textile and apparel companies are under siege, facing competitive threats that have been continually mounting for years. What it takes to be successful in the future is explored. The concept of “business as usual” has long outlived its usefulness, and new and refreshing approaches are necessary. Students will be introduced to avant-garde management concepts often espoused, but seldom adopted, by most textile and apparel managements. The course is designed to introduce the student to the global perspective of today’s apparel industry and to prepare the student to make critical international marketing and sourcing decisions within a complex economic environment. Students will explore the major variations which occur across international markets - economic, social, and cultural; examine the behavior of business within different marketing and manufacturing contexts; and consider the factors involved in making effective global marketing and sourcing decisions.


GFE-7321 credit

Global Fashion Seminar

This seminar course features speakers from across the fashion value chain who share their experiences and career insights. Students reflect on the implications of the topics presented for their own careers, relating concepts and insights to material covered in other Global Fashion Enterprise courses. Students have the opportunity to network informally with course speakers. 


GFE-7913 credits

Fashion Internship

Internships provide students with an opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge they have gained in the classroom. Under faculty supervision, students work in salaried positions related to their career goals. While on their assignments, students develop meaningful learning objectives, attend an internship seminar, complete challenging assignments and write bi-weekly reports analyzing articles in academic journals and practitioner publications.

Prerequisites: Minimum of 18 graduate credits (excluding foundation courses); available to full-time students only and subject to availability and eligibility; permission required, see program director or Office of Career Services for details.


GFE-7933 credits

Global Fashion Networking

This course exposes students to fashion ecosystems through an international study tour, coupled with classroom and experiential instruction. Students will tour design houses, mills, apparel factories & retail locations throughout the country (or countries) of focus, identifying best practices in merchandising & supply chain management within these organizations. Students will gain knowledge of product development & marketing, the manufacturing environment, quality assessment, and customer service. Students will acquire global competencies and understanding and will have the opportunity to hone their career aspirations and expand their professional networks through discussions with global fashion executives and hiring managers.
Prerequisite: GFE-600 Fashion Immersion.


GFE-7343 credits

Fashion Supply Chain Management  

The course concentrates on effective supply chain strategies with emphasis on planning and integration of supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students will be exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain management and assessment on strategic tradeoffs in a global context. Topics covered included: Collaboration on product development & supply chain design, inventory and risk management, international issues in supply chain management, network planning, strategic alliances, and the role of e-business.


GFE-7X13 credits

Global Fashion Project 1             

This is the first course of a 3-semester experience that allows customization to suit student career aspirations and interests. Student teams identify and prototype new products and designs, leading to comprehensive value chain mapping ranging from virtual design, to physical manufacturability, and merchandising strategies. Students participate in weekly progress critiques with studio faculty and other students, as well as regular meetings with outside project stakeholders. Semester concludes in a progress presentation with outside critics

Prerequisites: GFE 600 Fashion Immersion and completion of 12 credit hours of GFE coursework.


GFE-7X23 credits

Global Fashion Project 2                             

In this continuation of the Project 1 course, students partner with global firms to conduct strategic company assessments. Sponsored projects will be sought and made available to students as appropriate to their skills and interests. Design and merchandising focused projects will form the basis for the development of a supply chain strategy, including sourcing of raw materials and product specifications, factory costing, margin realization and risks assessment. Semester concludes with a presentation to outside critics.

Prerequisites: GFE 7X1 Global Fashion Project 1.


GFE-7X33 credits

Global Fashion Project 3                             

This final practicum module focuses on the development of a design brief, visual merchandising campaign, or business plan development. This portion of the capstone experience is designed for early-stage entrepreneurs or start-up businesses, with academic components on business law and ethical considerations. Students present their business model after interviewing clients and reviewing their plans with industry partners/sponsors. Each phase of the new business lifecycle concludes in a progress presentation with outside critics. 

Prerequisites: GFE 7X2 Global Fashion Project 2.


IARCP-5014 credits

Design I for I.A.

(Required for those with unrelated undergraduate degrees)

This studio is an introduction to the world of design with an emphasis on the built environment. Focus is on fundamental design principles, vocabulary, process methodologies and problem-solving strategies, along with developing and exploring methods of visual expression. Lectures and demonstrations stress abstraction as a primary building block in addition to an emphasis on historical case-study methodologies as a means of developing successful design strategies. Course work explores questions related to seeing and understanding design through the process of making and representing real scale objects and spaces.


IARCP-5024 credits

Design II for I.A 

(Required for those with unrelated undergraduate degrees)

The focus of this studio is an introduction to the elements, principles and theories of interior design. Through a series of projects of increasing size, students explore the conceptual, theoretical, functional, and aesthetic issues of designing interior space. Included are the elements of enclosure, the interrelationship of spaces, and environmental and behavior factors, as well as symbolism and socio-cultural factors. The experiential and intuitive nature of the design process is investigated as is the contributing role of finishes and furnishings in the definition of architectural space.

Prerequisites: Design I for I.A. and Graphic Representation


IARCP-5033 credits

Graphic Representation   

(Required for those with unrelated undergraduate degrees)

This course covers the fundamentals of freehand and mechanical architectural graphic representation, with a special focus on the interior environment, for both presentation and construction documentation purposes. Topics of include sketching and the construction of orthographic and paraline projections, including floor plans, elevations, sections, reflected ceiling plans, and one-point and two-point perspective drawings. In addition, students learn how to graphically depict furniture, to enhance their drawings through the use of shade and shadow, and the basics of architectural model building. Projects include surveying of actual sites and translating field notes into a set of coordinated drawings.


IARCP-5043 credits

Visual Communication I   

(Required for those with unrelated undergraduate degrees)

The primary intent of this course is to introduce students to fundamental CAD skills using AutoCad, and to establish the computer as an effective tool for architectural graphic communication and as a means for exploring, refining, and presenting design ideas. Through a series of assignments and projects, students will acquire the knowledge and skills to digitally communicate design concepts at various stages of development, and for multiple purposes.

Prerequisites: Design I for I.A. and Graphic Representation


IARCP-5053 credits

History of Design I for I.A.            

(Required for those with unrelated undergraduate degrees)

This lecture course surveys key examples of Western and non-Western architecture produced from prehistory through the 21st century. By tracing significant historical themes, students compare and contrast the various historical styles and acquire a working vocabulary for both analyzing and evaluating the built environment, and relating developments in the built environment to other forms of artistic expression such as painting and sculpture. Works are placed within a broad historical context by considering factors such as religion, philosophy, political and economic developments, as well as materials, construction methods, and local factors.


IARCP-5083 credits

Presentation Techniques 

(Required for those with unrelated undergraduate degrees)

This course explores the broad array of presentation techniques available to advantageously convey a designed interior. Emphasizing the presentation of a complete interior, students will refine and expand their drawing and model building skills using a wide range of media, and integrating manual and digital techniques. This course also addresses the interrelationship of the visual and verbal components of making an effective presentation.

Prerequisites: Design I for I.A. and Graphic Representation


IARC-6014 credits

Design III for I.A.

Building on skills and knowledge introduced in Design I and Design II, this studio focuses on the process of designing multi-space facilities. Through structured, medium scale design projects, students engage in the conceptual, theoretical, functional, and aesthetic issues, integrating research and evidenced based decision making with the intuitive nature of the design process. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental processes related to the development of a complete interior, from research, programming and space planning, to the selection and arrangement of appropriate furnishings and finishes. Students will also explore the influence of behavioral, socio-economic, and cultural factors on the functional and aesthetic quality of the built environment, and will communicate their designs by applying a range of professional presentation techniques.

Prerequisite: Design II for I.A.


IARC-6033 credits

History of Design II for I.A. (Required)

This course is an overview of the history of interior architecture and design, furniture, and the decorative arts. Lectures, readings, assignments and field trips, cover the development of period styles, major movements, and theoretical concepts of design as they relate to the complete interior. In depth discussions and site visits will focus on critical analysis and developing awareness of historical precedents.

Prerequisite: History of Design I for I.A.


IARC-6064 credits

Design IV for I.A. (Required)

Within the context of a specific program and client, students in this studio develop design solutions for a retail interior, and a mid-sized corporate facility while addressing the role of the interior designer in branding. The goals of this course include developing a comprehensive solution using innovative and appropriate conceptual approaches, refining the ability to integrate appropriate choices in finishes, furniture, and equipment (FF&E), and on the development of proficiency in handling three-dimensional space.

Prerequisite: Design III for I.A.


IARC-6073 credits

Technology I for I.A. (Required)

This course provides an overview of basic structural principles and systems and an in-depth study of non-structural interior construction and finish materials. Lectures and assignments address how the planning of interior space is impacted by the nature of various structural systems, and examine the visual and physical properties, application, and maintenance requirements of interior materials. In addition students are introduced to interior detailing in relation to architectural woodwork, millwork, partitions, floors, ceilings, stairs, custom cabinetry, furniture and specialty elements. The influence of sustainability and building codes on the choice of materials is also covered.

Prerequisite: Design II for I.A.


IARC-6083 credits

Technology II for I.A. (Required)

This second course in the Interior Architecture technology sequence introduces students to the art and science of interior illumination, energy usage, and various control systems including power, security, communications, and life-safety. Both artificial illumination and day lighting are covered with an emphasis on the architectural aspects of lighting design. Though lectures, demonstrations, and assignments, student explore various lighting design strategies, the effects of light on color, and how effective lighting can contribute to the goal of creating a sustainable interior.

 Prerequisite: Technology I for I.A.


IARC-6043 credits

Visual Communication II for I.A. (Required)

This Revit-based advanced digital imaging course focuses on the advantages of building modeling software (BIM) and related documentation techniques for integrated practice and collaboration. Students will build their knowledge of professional interior construction and specification documentation, produce a set of construction drawings for an interiors project, and explore other uses for this powerful and important type of program.


Prerequisites:
Design III I.A., Visual Communication I


IARC-6103 credits

Textiles and Materials (Required)

This course focuses on the art and science of textiles, and other non-textile based wall coverings in the creation of safe, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing commercial and residential interiors. Key topics include the history of textile design and manufacture, man-made and synthetic fibers, methods of construction, weaving, dying, and printing, and inherent performance characteristics. Lectures and assignments cover textile finishing and testing, as well as relevant codes, regulations and standards. Students also learn about the appropriate selection, specification, and procurement of materials and finished goods such as carpeting, upholstery, wall coverings, and window treatments and their correct installation and maintenance requirements. 


IARC-7013 credits

Design V for I.A. - Abroad (Required)

This studio occurs abroad and focuses on how culture, age, gender, and physical ability influence design, while exploring innovative materials and craft in the field of interior architecture. Assigned projects address how design needs may vary for different socio-economic populations and how understanding social and cultural norms are relevant to making appropriate design decisions. Students consider the role of construction techniques, material selection, and ergonomics in the design process and detailing as they will apply this information to their design work and the detailing of custom elements.

Prerequisite: Design IV for I.A.


IARC-7032 credits

History of Design III for I.A. – Abroad (Required)

This advanced history and theory seminar immerses students in both historical and contemporary examples of architecture, interiors and decorative arts in Scandinavia. Through a combination of readings, writings, discussion and field work, students explore the relationship between culture, and building form, furnishings, and the distinctive use of materials and ornament.

Prerequisite: History of Design II for I.A.


IARC-7024 credits

Design VI for I.A.

This advanced studio emphasizes the resolution of complex design issues in the context of health care interiors. In determining a design strategy, students research, develop and analyze the problem, relevant environment and behavioral factors, and then proceed with a completed design. Holistic development of concept, current sustainable design solutions, large-scale space planning, materials, construction details, lighting design, building systems, building codes, handicapped accessibility and furnishings are emphasized in the completed work.

Prerequisite: Design V for I.A.


IARC-7073 credits

Technology III for I.A. (Required)

This final course in the technology sequence focuses on the study of a broad range of mechanical, plumbing, HVAC, and other building systems and their integration with interior construction. Students are be introduced to the issues of acoustical control, indoor air quality, and life safety in building interiors and the critical role that interior building systems and materials play in the establishment of human comfort and the protection of the health, safety and welfare of building occupants.

Prerequisite: Technology II for I.A.


IARC-7083 credits

Professional Practice and Ethics (Required)

Students in this course learn about the managerial, financial, legal, and ethical aspects of professional practice, including types of business formations, marketing, contracts, industry relationships, and project management. Lectures and assignments cover the range of specialized services performed by design firms, and the role and responsibilities of the designer in different positions and at various stages of their career. The importance of lifelong learning, professional development, and the value and role of professional associations is also discussed.

Prerequisite: Design IV for I.A.


IARC-7092 credits

Research and Programming (Required)

This course provides the foundation for the Thesis course in the following semester, and covers standard and emerging methods of research and programming in the field of interior design and architecture. In consultation with faculty, students will select a project type and site, and produce in-depth research, precedent studies, programming and analysis, embracing relevant issues such as cultural, sociological, political, economic, environmental, anthropometric, human factors, life safety, and construction methods and technologies, amongst others. Students are expected to organize and synthesize this information and document their research in both written and graphic form. This information along with architectural documentation and analysis of the selected site is presented to a group of jurors with expertise in the area of research and/or project type.

Prerequisite: Design V for I.A.


IARC-7105 credits

Thesis for Interior Architecture (Required)

Building on the semester of research and programming (IARC-709), the Thesis in Interior Architecture challenges students to integrate knowledge and skills acquired throughout the curriculum and can be undertaken only after successful completion of appropriate coursework. While most students will complete this course using an applied project based approach, students have an option of pursuing theoretical research.

Thesis/Applied: This major culminating design experience is a self-directed, faculty monitored independent study appropriate for students interested in exploring the creative/design dimensions of Interior Architecture while exploring a significant and advanced question in the discipline. Students select one project from a range of carefully screened design projects of appropriate and comparable scope, sophistication, and complexity.

Thesis/Theoretical: The thesis option is a self-directed, faculty monitored independent study appropriate for students interested in exploring theoretical dimension(s) in Interior Architecture. The thesis option will be attractive to students interested in pursuing doctoral studies and/or academic careers.

Prerequisites: Design VI for I.A., Technology III for I.A., Visual Communication II for I.A. &

Research and Programming


IARC-7911 credit

Internship for I.A. (Required)

Internship is a college-monitored work experience that provides the student with the opportunity to integrate theory and practice in a professional work environment. While gaining practical experience though a minimum of 240 hours at the job placement site, students further develop the knowledge and skills gained in the classroom. Placements are determined prior to the beginning of the semester, at which time learning objectives are determined with faculty supervision. Students keep a reflective journal based on their work experience throughout the semester, and are evaluated jointly by the host mentor and faculty. Students are exposed to a broad spectrum of professional practice, particularly those not available in the academic setting, and are expected to make a professional contribution to the work of their host organization.

Prerequisite: Design IV for I.A.


IDD-6103 credits

Introduction to Digital Audio Production

This course introduces students to basic and intermediate digital audio concepts and skills for use in a broad array of multimedia, including instructional applications. Students will generate a variety of professional-grade digital audio artifacts using industry-standard software and processes; instruction will focus on common elements of digital audio production to allow transfer of knowledge to various tools and platforms rather than focusing solely on the mastery of a single tool. Course topics include basic digital audio theory, comparing and selecting input and output devices, non-linear editing, mixing and mastering, multi-tracking, audio for video, and optimizing audio for different delivery methods. Students will create at least one example of instructional audio to use in their portfolio.


IDD-6216 credits

Digital Experience Design

This first studio in the sequence of three will develop the student’s ability to synthesize 2D, 3D and 4D conceptions of space with knowledge and skills of interactivity to create and produce the digital experience. This studio will solidify and expand the student’s vocabulary and ability to innovate within the digital context. Students will complete a project that explores spatial, emotional, informational and communicative issues. The project should reflect a high degree of conceptual, aesthetic and technical mastery for successful completion of this course.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Master of Science in Interactive Design and Media program


IDD-6233 credits

Theory of Electronic Communication Seminar II

This course provides students with a theoretical understanding of the role of the Interactive designer within the constantly evolving electronic marketplace. Issues of e-commerce, digital communication, electronic ethics and professional practice will be discussed. Special focus will be placed on how our existing culture has been, and is currently being, revolutionized by the information explosion. A portion of this course will be taught using the Internet as a tool to share information, complete research and communicate with experts in the field.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Master of Science in Interactive Design and Media program


IDD-6243 credits

Multimedia

This elective will focus on expanding the student’s understanding of and ability to create effective multimedia experiences. A semester-long project will develop their mastery of visual, audio, temporal and kinesthetic elements and principals of design. The project will explore the methodology and tools used to create sophisticated experiential design. Some key concerns of the course are human-centered interfaces, intuitive navigational systems and mixed-media narrative. Projects will combine text, sound, images and movement within 4D-responsive environments. A final, fully functional prototype, presented on CD-ROM, will be required.


IDD-6253 credits

Advanced Web Design and Strategy

This course will focus on the design of the online experience. Emphasis will be given to an understanding and mastery of the design issues involved in creating user interfaces and content for low bandwidth dissemination. A semester-long project will develop the student’s abilities in both the design and production of web-based media. The project will include components such as site architecture/planning, digital imaging and typography for the web, interface design, and XHTML and CSS production.


IDD-6263 credits

Digital Photography

This elective course focuses on the use of the tools and techniques of digital photography; cameras, scanners, printers, along with the computer and software programs needed to render images. This course is intended for Web and e-designers, as well as graphic designers, and teaches how to render digital images for their respective domains. The course contains a brief description of traditional photography and the aesthetic issues addressed in its history along with how these issues are both similar and different from those of digital photography. Particular emphasis will be placed on the difference between description and suggestion and how this impacts the interpretation of images within a design context.


IDD-6273 credits

Digital Video Design and Production

This course will introduce the student to the basics of non-linear digital video and audio production techniques. Projects will focus on the potential of narrative as a main component of any time-based media application, with assignments ranging from short exercises in visual storytelling/narrative to a final, more complex project such as the design of a video title sequence. Students will develop an understanding of story-boarding, scene visualization and editing techniques, along with competency in video and audio software packages such as Final Cut Pro, After Effects and Pro Tools.


IDD-6283 credits

3D Modeling

This elective course exposes students to the conceptual and technical aspects of three-dimensional modeling, photo-realistic rendering and virtual environments. Students will complete a series of specifically designed exercises of increasing difficulty, leading to a final project of the student’s choosing. The class will cover the basic principles of 3D modeling and animation including polygonal and NURBS modeling, texturing, lighting, and animation.


IDD-6293 credits

Introduction to Flash

This course will explore the use of Macromedia Flash to create instructional materials for CD-ROM or Web delivery. Students will create scalable vector graphics, develop animated and interactive elements, use ActionScript to control these elements and learn design principles appropriate to the effective use of Flash elements.


IDD-6316 credits

Digital Innovation Design

This second in a sequence of three studios focuses on the ability of individual designers to pursue innovation. This course is comprised of several projects which highlight the role that interactive designers play in the multi-disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between functionality and usability. Students will address current interface design issues through a series of screen-based projects, each ranging in complexity and theme, and placing particular emphasis on the visual and semantic aspects of design solutions. Students will be expected to seek new ways to navigate through 4D environments, challenging common interface paradigms. They are encouraged to build 4D spaces that are expressive, dynamic and experiential, while retaining their intuitive usefulness.


IDD-6323 credits

Database Management and Scripting

Using PHP, students will learn fundamental server-side scripting concepts like creating arrays and functions, automating Unix commands, gathering and processing user input, and dynamically writing out XHTML and JavaScript. Relational Database concepts are covered and students will learn to conceptually model data and to create, query, and manage their database using SQL. The course will culminate with the students, for their final project, creating a web application that ties XHTML front-end to a MySQL database using PHP.


IDD-6353 credits

Interactive Narrative/Drama

Since the beginning of time, storytelling has been used as a universal practice that has proven to be a powerful tool of communication for fostering understanding, social inquiry, and self-expression. Interactive narrative is an emerging interdisciplinary genre which uses interactivity, hypertext, video and film, sound, drama, ideograms, literary fiction, multi-user spaces, interactive installations, live performance, and artificial intelligence to tell a story. This course will explore theoretical perspectives on both interactivity and narrative structure and provide an overview of the forms, strategies, and conventions of each while emphasizing approaches on how to integrate the two.


IDD-7433 credits

Flash Action Scripting

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Flash. Basic Flash interactivity and action scripting will be covered in depth. Topics covered in this course will include advanced interactivity, navigation tricks, variables, looping and decision-making, sound and sprites.

Prerequisite: IDD629


IDD-7913 credits

Internship

Internships provide an opportunity for professional experience supporting application and further development of the knowledge gained in the classroom. Under faculty supervision, students work in positions related to their program and/or career goal, develop learning objectives and complete reflective academic assignments. Students should be exposed to a broad spectrum of professional practices, particularly those not available in the academic setting, and are expected to make a professional contribution to their employer. Requirements may apply; see program director or Office of Career Services for details.


IDD-7983 credits

Independent Study & Research

This course will allow students to pursue individual areas of interest while working jointly with a faculty member. Enrollment is subject to the availability and approval of both the program director and faculty member. The student must have 18 or more graduate-level credits, and a prospectus of the proposed independent study must be approved at least one month prior to registration. See appropriate form available online at Registrar’s website, www.philau.edu/registrar.


IDD-9413 credits

Interactive Design Synthesis Project Preparation

This course is the first step towards completing the final synthesis project. Students will be asked to identify and analyze potential projects through a number of lenses including technical feasibility, marketability and design potential. With faculty guidance, each student will select a particular project based upon individual interests and professional aspirations. In order to successfully complete this course, a final document must be submitted by the student outlining the relevant factors that will determine the route to developing a successful synthesis project.

Prerequisites: IDD621, IDD623


IDD-9426 credits

Interactive Design Synthesis Project

This is the third of a sequence of three studios focusing on interdisciplinary interactive design. This synthesis studio will develop the ability of the interactive designer to successfully bring an interactive design project to completion. Students will develop a final, working prototype of a product, service, entertainment or publication of their choice that synthesizes all of their knowledge and skill from the previous semesters. The final project must demonstrate marketability and/or successful functionality within the larger community.

Prerequisites: IDD631, IDD941


IDF-5003 credits

Drawing: Design and Development

This is an advanced drawing course developed for designers of all disciplines who want to improve the designer’s ability to apply knowledge imparted in other courses to the development of designs. Wherever possible the subject matter of the students’ design studio courses will be used as the subject matter for drawing exercises.

Prerequisite: VSDRW-101 and INDD-102


IDF-5023 credits

Foundations in Web Design and Strategy

This course will focus on the principles of raster and vector electronic imaging as a means to provide a solid foundation needed to succeed in the interactive design field. This is a lab-based class with specific instruction in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit toward the graduate degree.


IDF-5033 credits

Theory of Electronic Communication I

This course introduces students to the theoretical understanding of the role of the interactive designer. Special focus will be placed on how our existing culture has been, and is currently being, revolutionized by the information revolution. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit toward the graduate degree.


IDF-5053 credits

Materials and Processes: Manufacturing

This course is concerned with the exploration of materials used in the mass production of products, the processes used to shape these materials and the applicability of these materials to product-design solutions. Students should be prepared to visit a number of manufacturing facilities. A survey of rapid prototyping technologies completes the course.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-102 or ENGR-102


IDF-5063 credits

Application Software

Using Windows and Mac platforms, this foundation course will focus on experiences which will familiarize students with instructional applications and personal productivity uses of microcomputers. Word processing, database management, spreadsheets, graphic tools and telecommunications will be analyzed in terms of their application to business and education. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit toward the graduate degree.


IDF-5074 credits

Design I for Industrial Design

This studio is an introduction to design for undergraduate majors in industrial design. The course will provide an intensive introduction to design as an iterative problem-solving process. It will also introduce strategies for making and analyzing form, and present basic techniques of two-dimensional visualization and documentation of three-dimensional objects and principles of design critique, testing and research. 


IDF-5083 credits

Materials and Process: Fabrication

This course introduces shop techniques as they pertain to industrial design model-making and prototype construction. All industrial design students must take this course for shop equipment safety training and pass a safety test. Throughout the semester, attention is given to safety precautions for the shop, along with demonstrations of shop equipment and fabrication processes. A major portion of the course will consist of developing an understanding of the materials and machinery commonly used by industrial designers for producing both working and appearance models. 


IDF-5093 credits

Rendering for Industrial Design

This course provides an introduction to the traditional techniques and materials that industrial designers use to develop and represent three-dimensional concepts and ideas. Students become proficient in the use of pencils, markers, pastels and airbrush on a variety of media. Emphasis is placed on understanding the significance of color and graphic applications for industrial design.

Prerequisite: DRAW-201 or permission of the instructor


IDF-5103 credits

Ergonomic Studies

This course analyzes human factors as related to broad aspects of design development. It explores the issues of operator/user human factors and their impact on design. The outcome of this course will be to ascertain the relationship of basic human dimensions on product design. Subjects include systems reliability, sensory and motor processes, basic research techniques and anthropometric studies.

Prerequisite: INDD-106 or permission of the instructor


IDF-5116 credits

Interactive Design III

This studio will explore the translation of the three- and four-dimensional concepts into two-dimensional screen images, interactivity and animation. Students will be introduced to the theory and practice of motion graphic production. The mediums of choreography, filmmaking, architecture, performance art, and music will be discussed as potential sources of inspiration for creating new and powerful forms of digital space and experience. A series of increasingly complex projects will culminate in a more demanding final project.


IDF-5126 credits

Interactive Design IV

This studio will develop the ability of the digital designer to successfully participate within an interdisciplinary team. Students from a variety of majors will work together to develop a final, working prototype of a product, service, experience or publication of their choice that synthesizes their knowledge and skills from the previous studios. The students will develop a final project that demonstrates marketability and successfully functions within the larger community. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit toward the graduate degree.

Prerequisite: IDF511


IDF-5134 credits

Design V for Industrial Design

The fifth in a series of eight studios, this course focuses on ideas of designs derived from an understanding of consumer behavior. Emphasis is placed on user needs, ease of use and product culture, without ignoring the practicalities imposed by manufacturer’s markets, manufacturing process constraints and investment concerns. Students will demonstrate control of the process of design to develop meaningful concepts that employ appropriate technology for their eventual realization.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-202 


IDF-5143 credits

Visual Studies: Drawing

This drawing course emphasizes the understanding of space and alternative approaches for recording and expressing it. Much information in regard to drawing practice will be accumulated during this semester such as mark making skills, developing sensitivity to light and shade, experimentation with media and the use of color as an introduction to figure drawing.

*This course should not be taken by students who have received credit for DRAW 101 or DRAW 201 in the School of Design & Engineering or the College of Architecture and the Built Environment.*


IDF-5156 credits

Design VI for Industrial Design

In this sixth of a series of eight studio courses, students design and develop consumer products. Students learn about the complexities of the product-development process, during which assembly requirements, marketing issues, materials and component development all affect the initial intent of their designs. Students are required to fabricate a fully functional prototype of their designs. A selected team of professionals from the industry will evaluate the final product.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-301


IMBA-6001.5 credit

Management Concepts

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of managerial functions and decision-making models in traditional and more innovative organizations. Students are familiarized with the importance of organizational communications, including verbal and written communications and the criticality of using multiple communication channels. Students explore basic negotiation techniques and methods of conflict resolution.


IMBA-6011.5 credit

Marketing Concepts

This course provides students with a broad understanding of the various organizational marketing functions including the development, positioning, pricing, distribution, and promotion of products, services, and business ideas. Attention is focused on understanding of the basic marketing concepts including strategic planning, marketing mix, market segmentation, branding, consumer research, and marketing research and applying the knowledge to formulate marketing strategies for business opportunities. No prerequisites.


IMBA-6023 credits

Managing Innovative People and Teams

This course addresses the skills and attitudes that support leadership in complex, innovative organizations under conditions of uncertainty and change. Students will explore the concept of self-leadership, managing change, ethical decision-making, power and influence, motivation, facilitation of diverse teams, conflict resolution, and organizational culture. The course begins with creative exercises in leadership style self-assessment and relates these results to leadership in new, innovative organizational structures.

Prerequisite: IMBA 600 Management Concepts.


IMBA-6043 credits

Business Model Innovation

In this course students fully explore how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value through a customer-centric approach to business model innovation. The impact of industry disruption through business model innovation will be explored as students analyze and evaluate existing models. Using creative thinking and specific patterns, students will gain experience in planning and executing new models to address the complex challenges facing businesses from a variety of industries in the market place today.

Prerequisite: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts.


IMBA-6253 credits

Communication Negotiation and the Creative Economy

This course covers the concepts and art of effective management communications and negotiations in the business environment. The total communications process – verbal, nonverbal, presentation, written and electronic is reviewed in the context of today’s work environment. The perspectives and needs of top management, interactive teams, individual contributors, and clients are examined and translated into professional practices. Experiential exercises and class discussions will build participants understanding of styles and skills in negotiating. Coursework will focus on the uses of power, influence, and negotiating styles, methods of conflict resolution and means of influencing others.


IMBA-6273 credits

Competitive Technical Intelligence

This course will focus on the latest technological advances for managing data and communications effectively. Students will acquire the skills and concepts necessary to use a system to handle data efficiently for large and small organizations, national or international in scope. Network technology and usage of computer networks, as well as ethical and security issues will also be addressed. The concepts of telecommunications and the costs and benefits associated with this transmission of information will be explored. Methods of instruction include hands-on/application orientation.


IMBA-6283 credits

Accounting for Management Decisions

This course provides students previously exposed to financial and managerial accounting principles an opportunity to study the structure and use of accounting systems designed to aid management in controlling costs and profits. The course stresses the following: financial statement interpretation as a basis for decision making, cash flow analysis, cash budgeting, cost volume profit analysis, costing and interpretation of manufacturing systems and the impact of international competition, responsibility accounting and the impact of inflation.


IMBA-6293 credits

Financial Policy and Planning

This course focuses on the investment and financing decisions of firms. Topics include capital budgeting, cash management and cash flow analysis, capital structure, dividends and international operations. Financial policy making is considered within the context of contemporary valuation and risk management theories. Various financial planning models are analyzed in the course.


IMBA-6303 credits

Operations from a Systems Perspective

This course will focus on the mathematical models and methods available for use in formulating and analyzing business decision-making problems in industry. Areas of study include: probability theory, decision analysis, game theory, forecasting techniques, project management, queuing models, allocating scarce resources using linear programming and integer-programming techniques, and deterministic and probabilistic inventory models.


IMBA-6423 credits

Strategic Insight and Implementation

This course will focus on the design and implementation of a strategic plan in global industries and the importance of such a plan in dealing with the many challenges facing organizations in the years ahead. Strategic planning models and research findings will be investigated. During the semester, students will analyze strategic threats and opportunities that confront corporate-level executives as well as managers of business units. Students will work in teams on the development of a strategic plan for a local profit or nonprofit organization. The focus will be on developing effective strategies that clarify the future direction of the chosen organization and deal with the rapidly changing environment. Strategic plans will be presented in oral and written form to the organization. This is a capstone course and students will draw from the knowledge they have gained throughout the M.B.A. program. Extensive written individual and team assignments and oral presentations are included.

Prerequisites: All core MBA courses must be completed or taken concurrently.


IMBA-7003 credits

International Economic and Finance

This course explores interrelationships between economic growth/development theories and financial applications in global markets, emphasizing international financial management techniques and practices. Topics include international trade, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets and risk, the international financial system, and portfolio effects of capital budgets on international capital markets. Students explore current issues of concern to multinational firms such as environmental problems, organizing for optimal results, sources and uses of funds, and accounting, tax, and control issues.


IMBA-7143 credits

New Product Development

This project-based, team oriented course provides a methodology for discovering and executing new business opportunities. Following a product design and development roadmap, students participate in innovation games and charrette exercises, identify customer needs, and generate product concepts. Weekly assignments focus on the business aspects and general design concepts of new product development. The course culminates in the creation of a prototyped concept and submission of a business plan.

Prerequisites: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts and IMBA 604 Business Model Innovation.


IMBA-7413 credits

Financial Accounting and Reporting I

An in-depth study of current accounting issues and pronouncements, including long-term debt and troubled debt restructuring, accounting for leases, pension and post-retirement, income tax accounting, price-level adjusted financial statement reporting, and accounting for partnerships (equity, admission, profit and loss sharing, and liquidation).

Prerequisite: IMBA 628.


IMBA-7423 credits

Financial Accounting and Reporting II

A continuation of Financial Accounting & Reporting I, including the study of accounting for business combinations (purchases and pooling of interests), accounting for the translation or remeasurement of foreign subsidiary financial statements into dollars to meet business combination reporting requirements, accounting for transactions denominated in a foreign currency (including purchases, sales, and hedges), and analysis of financial statements.

Prerequisite: MBA 741.


IMBA-7434 credits

Audit and Attestation

A study of the development of financial compliance and operational auditing techniques, including analysis of current issues in the auditing profession such as audit risk, ethical conduct, materiality, audit sampling procedures, and reporting issues. These areas will be studied with reference to pronouncements of the accounting profession and current literature. The study of operational, as well as financial compliance auditing, will be enhanced using case studies and examples.

Prerequisite: iMBA 742.


IMBA-7593 credits

Entrepreneurship

This course will provide an overview of the major elements of entrepreneurial activity including planning and evaluation of the business, financing, typical operating and administrative issues and alternatives for growth and sale. Entrepreneurial opportunities and challenges will be examined and a variety of venture opportunities will be analyzed. The course will give students a realistic look at the challenges involved in starting a viable business and help students in a personal evaluation of their own skills, talents and career potential. Utilizing business planning software, each student will prepare a comprehensive business plan for a business opportunity the student selects and perceives to be viable and practical. The plan may be utilized for presentation to potential investors.      


IMBA-7613 credits

Promotion Management

Prerequisite: All MBA foundation courses

This course focuses on the promotion and communication decisions of corporations and how to employ promotion strategy to solve marketing problems and enhance opportunities. Advertising, sales promotions, publicity, public relations and personal selling are investigated.

Prerequisites: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts and IMBA 604 Business Model Innovation.


IMBA-7623 credits

Qualitative and Quantitative Marketing Research

This course gives students the qualitative and quantitative tools they need to find business opportunities and/or solve business problems. Students learn how to formulate the research problem, design the research, collect the data, and analyze the data. Various qualitative and quantitative research techniques will be examined and applied to identify opportunities, analyze data, and make strategic decision. Students will be required to conduct a research study using both qualitative and quantitative methods during the semester.

Prerequisites: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts and IMBA 604 Business Model Innovation.


IMBA-7723 credits

Investment and Portfolio Management

This course will acquaint the student with the tools essential for sound money management. Investment management begins by considering the goals of an investor with respect to risk exposure, the tax environment, liquidity needs and appreciation versus income potentials. Strategies will be developed to satisfy these objectives. Special attention will be paid to the theories of determinants of asset prices, including the capital-asset pricing model.

Prerequisite: IMBA 629.


IMBA-7763 credits

Speculative Markets

This course is intended to introduce students to financial futures, options and swaps. The objective of this course is to clearly explain why these securities exist and how to accurately price them. The course will present a balance of the institutional details, theoretical foundations and practical applications of this field. Prerequisites: MBA 629 and MBA 772.


IMBA-7773 credits

Fixed Income Securities

This is a highly specialized course that focuses on the fixed income market with emphasis on the bond market. Topics include pricing of bonds, bond price volatility, types of fixed income securities, term structure of interest rates and bond portfolio-management strategies. Various fixed income products are analyzed in the course, including some derivative products in the context of fixed-income securities. Prerequisite: MBA629.


IMBA 791

Career Jumpstart Internship

Internships provide students with an opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge they have gained in the classroom. Under faculty supervision, students work in salaried positions related to their career goals. While on their assignments, students develop meaningful learning objectives, attend an internship seminar, complete challenging assignments, and write bi-weekly reports analyzing articles in academic journals and practitioner publications. Prerequisites: Minimum of 18 graduate credits completed (excluding foundation courses); available to full-time students only and subject to availability and eligibility; permission of internship and program directors.


IMBA-7923 credits

International Business Innovation

The focus of this course is visiting representatives of U.S. and non-U.S. businesses in various industries abroad. The international business trip will span approximately two weeks. Students will meet with business executives, government officials, labor leaders and academicians in specific industries abroad. Students will gain an appreciation for both the formal business aspects and informal social aspects of conducting commerce in foreign countries. Registration requires permission of the program director.


IMBAX-6001.5 credits

Management Concepts

This online course introduces students to the theory and practice of managerial functions and decision-making models in traditional and more innovative organizations. Students are familiarized with the importance of organizational communications, including verbal and written communications and the criticality of using multiple communication channels. Students explore basic negotiation techniques and methods of conflict resolution.


IMBAX-6011.5 credits

Marketing Concepts

This online course provides students with a broad understanding of the various organizational marketing functions including the development, positioning, pricing, distribution, and promotion of products, services, and business ideas. Attention is focused on understanding of the basic marketing concepts including strategic planning, marketing mix, market segmentation, branding, consumer research, and marketing research and applying the knowledge to formulate marketing strategies for business opportunities.


IMBAX-6023 credits

Managing Innovative People and Teams

This online course addresses the skills and attitudes that support leadership in complex, innovative organizations under conditions of uncertainty and change. Students will explore the concept of self-leadership, managing change, ethical decision-making, power and influence, motivation, facilitation of diverse teams, conflict resolution, and organizational culture. The course begins with creative exercises in leadership style self-assessment and relates these results to leadership in new, innovative organizational structures. Prerequisite: IMBA 600 Management Concepts.


IMBAX-6043 credits

Business Model Innovation

In this online course students fully explore how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value through a customer-centric approach to business model innovation. The impact of industry disruption through business model innovation will be explored as students analyze and evaluate existing models. Using creative thinking and specific patterns, students will gain experience in planning and executing new models to address the complex challenges facing businesses from a variety of industries in the market place today. Prerequisite: MBA 601 Marketing Concepts.


IMBAX-6253 credits

Communication Negotiation and the Creative Economy

This online course covers the concepts and art of effective management communications and negotiations in the business environment. The total communications process – verbal, nonverbal, presentation, written and electronic is reviewed in the context of today’s work environment. The perspectives and needs of top management, interactive teams, individual contributors, and clients are examined and translated into professional practices. Experiential exercises and class discussions will build participants understanding of styles and skills in negotiating. Coursework will focus on the uses of power, influence, and negotiating styles, methods of conflict resolution and means of influencing others.


IMBAX-6273 credits

Competitive Technical Intelligence

This online course will focus on the latest technological advances for managing data and communications effectively. Students will acquire the skills and concepts necessary to use a system to handle data efficiently for large and small organizations, national or international in scope. Network technology and usage of computer networks, as well as ethical and security issues will also be addressed. The concepts of telecommunications and the costs and benefits associated with this transmission of information will be explored. Methods of instruction include hands-on/application orientation.


IMBAX-6283 credits

Accounting for Management Decisions

This online course provides students previously exposed to financial and managerial accounting principles an opportunity to study the structure and use of accounting systems designed to aid management in controlling costs and profits. The course stresses the following: financial statement interpretation as a basis for decision making, cash flow analysis, cash budgeting, cost volume profit analysis, costing and interpretation of manufacturing systems and the impact of international competition, responsibility accounting and the impact of inflation.


IMBAX-6293 credits

Financial Policy and Planning

This online course focuses on the investment and financing decisions of firms. Topics include capital budgeting, cash management and cash flow analysis, capital structure, dividends and international operations. Financial policy making is considered within the context of contemporary valuation and risk management theories. Various financial planning models are analyzed in the course.


IMBAX-6303 credits

Operations from a Systems Perspective

This online course will focus on the mathematical models and methods available for use in formulating and analyzing business decision-making problems in industry. Areas of study include: probability theory, decision analysis, game theory, forecasting techniques, project management, queuing models, allocating scarce resources using linear programming and integer-programming techniques, and deterministic and probabilistic inventory models.


IMBAX-6423 credits

Strategic Insight and Implementation

This online course will focus on the design and implementation of a strategic plan in global industries and the importance of such a plan in dealing with the many challenges facing organizations in the years ahead. Strategic planning models and research findings will be investigated. During the semester, students will analyze strategic threats and opportunities that confront corporate-level executives as well as managers of business units. Students will work in teams on the development of a strategic plan for a local profit or nonprofit organization. The focus will be on developing effective strategies that clarify the future direction of the chosen organization and deal with the rapidly changing environment. Strategic plans will be presented in oral and written form to the organization. This is a capstone course and students will draw from the knowledge they have gained throughout the M.B.A. program. Extensive written individual and team assignments and oral presentations are included. Prerequisites: All core MBA courses must be completed or taken concurrently.


IMBAX-7003 credits

International Economic and Finance

This online course explores interrelationships between economic growth/development theories and financial applications in global markets, emphasizing international financial management techniques and practices. Topics include international trade, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets and risk, the international financial system, and portfolio effects of capital budgets on international capital markets. Students explore current issues of concern to multinational firms such as environmental problems, organizing for optimal results, sources and uses of funds, and accounting, tax, and control issues.


IMBAX-7143 credits

New Product Development

This project-based, team oriented online course provides a methodology for discovering and executing new business opportunities. Following a product design and development roadmap, students participate in innovation games and charrette exercises, identify customer needs, and generate product concepts. Weekly assignments focus on the business aspects and general design concepts of new product development. The course culminates in the creation of a prototyped concept and submission of a business plan. Prerequisites: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts and IMBA 604 Business Model Innovation.


IMBAX-7593 credits

Entrepreneurship

This online course will provide an overview of the major elements of entrepreneurial activity including planning and evaluation of the business, financing, typical operating and administrative issues and alternatives for growth and sale. Entrepreneurial opportunities and challenges will be examined and a variety of venture opportunities will be analyzed. The course will give students a realistic look at the challenges involved in starting a viable business and help students in a personal evaluation of their own skills, talents and career potential. Utilizing business planning software, each student will prepare a comprehensive business plan for a business opportunity the student selects and perceives to be viable and practical. The plan may be utilized for presentation to potential investors.       


IMBAX-7613 credits

Promotion Management

This online course focuses on the promotion and communication decisions of corporations and how to employ promotion strategy to solve marketing problems and enhance opportunities. Advertising, sales promotions, publicity, public relations and personal selling are investigated. Prerequisites: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts and IMBA 604 Business Model Innovation.


IMBAX-7623 credits

Qualitative and Quantitative Marketing Research

This online course gives students the qualitative and quantitative tools they need to find business opportunities and/or solve business problems. Students learn how to formulate the research problem, design the research, collect the data, and analyze the data. Various qualitative and quantitative research techniques will be examined and applied to identify opportunities, analyze data, and make strategic decision. Students will be required to conduct a research study using both qualitative and quantitative methods during the semester. Prerequisites: IMBA 601 Marketing Concepts and IMBA 604 Business Model Innovation.


IMBF-5033 credits

Foundations of Economics

This online course introduces students to basic microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts including supply and demand, economic indicators, labor economics, international trade, and fiscal and monetary policy. The course focuses on the relevance of these concepts for organizations and organizational decision-making. Prerequisite: MBF508 or equivalent undergraduate course.


IMBF-5041.5 credits

Financial and Managerial Accounting

This online course is designed to introduce students to  the fundamentals of financial and managerial accounting. Accounting information is discussed as a basis for planning, control and managerial decision-making.


IMBF-5051.5 credits

Financial Management

This introductory level finance course examines the role of financial decision-makers at the corporate level. Emphasis is placed on the goals of the firm, efficient market hypothesis, discounted cash flow analysis, and the trade-off between risk and return.


IMBF-5081.5 credits

Statistical Analysis for Business Decisions

This is a foundations course in Statistics for the MBA program. Descriptive statistical measures and probability theory are combined to provide the basis for statistical decision-making techniques. Areas covered include: measures of central tendency, measures of variability, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, one- and two-way analysis of variance, Chi-squares and non-parametric statistical techniques. 


IMBF-5101.5 credits

Operations Management

This introductory level course provides students with an understanding of the latest quantitative tools for corporate decision-making. Topics include quality-control applications, optimization techniques (including linear programming), the simplex method, the transportation model, and the assignment model. Other topics include time-series analysis, queuing theory and an introduction to total quality management. Computer applications, case analysis and problem-solving sets are used throughout the course.
Prerequisite: MBF508 or equivalent undergraduate course.


MCM-600 (formerly MCM-610)3 credits

Construction Estimate and Scheduling
Utilizing pertinent case studies, this course focuses upon the planning and scheduling stages of the building process, with particular emphasis upon reading construction documents and basic estimating principles applied to small-scale, residential and commercial projects. Construction site procedures, as well as techniques for estimating unit quantities and costs of materials, labor and equipment, are introduced, and given industry application utilizing building specifications and computer software.


MCM-6023 credits

Construction Information Modeling

Technological advances within the construction industry demand that today’s managers possess proficiency in current building methodologies and literacy in current computer software. This course concentrates upon the use of sustainable construction methods and materials to produce cost-effective projects with emphasis upon resource efficiency, environmental protection and waste minimization. Innovative methods of documentation and digital techniques, principally Integrated Practice and Building Information Modeling (BIM) are given comprehensive coverage, relative to the application of the software to the actualization of the built form.


MCM-6031.5 credits

Construction Law: Roles and Responsibilities

Current legal problems associated with the construction industry are investigated from management’s perspective through consideration of the roles assigned to the various project participants. The entire building process from pre-design to owner use is scrutinized, highlighting case law and statutory information, contractual relationships, licensing issues, design through build, bidding and procurement rules, mechanics liens, insurance and surety bonds, and liability awareness. Available methods of dispute resolution are evaluated, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and litigation with emphasis upon claim avoidance.


MCM-6043 credits

Project Finance and Cost Control

Utilizing pertinent case studies, this course probes the economics of construction and analyzes project control systems used to effectively manage cost and time. Principles drawn from cognate business fields, specifically accounting, finance, and taxation, are given real-life application relative to construction projects of multiple types and scales. Key budgetary issues are examined in-depth, including financial statements and balance sheets, variance analysis and optimum cash flow methods, as well as efficient cost reporting systems. Additional topics include internal controls, financial analysis and presentation, contractor surety and lending, and fraud, with particular emphasis upon cost-effective methods to procure and deliver construction projects including lump sum, unit price, cost-plus, and design-build.


MCM-6063 credits

Construction Risk Management
This course examines the key concepts, models, codes, tools and techniques used in managing risks within the architecture, construction and engineering industries. The course will focus on planning for the effective implementation of the risk management process, identification and qualitative and quantitative assessment of risks, appropriate strategies to respond to risks and how to sustain the risk management process throughout the life of a construction project.


MCM-6083 credits

Construction Environmental Management
This course examines the key concepts, systems, laws, tools and techniques used in managing environmental risks within the architecture, construction and engineering industries. The course will focus on environmental issues from a construction business management perspective and include analytical techniques, management processes and business strategies that aid successful reconciliation of environmental and economic performance goals for construction operations. Through a combination of real-life cases, readings, lectures, videos, and simulations, class sessions will seek to engage students in discussions aimed at developing systems of corporate environmental management, covering compliance, environmental risk management, pollution prevention, product stewardship, supply chain management, and communication. 


MCM-612 (formerly MCM-601)3 credits

Advanced Construction Project Management

Through detailed case studies drawn from contemporary practice, this course provides in-depth study of the principles and methods critical to the management and integration of the design and construction processes. Planning, scheduling, bidding, professional/client relationships, and contractor selection. Theoretical and practical aspects of project planning are charted, incorporating such essential steps as feasibility studies, estimating project costs, cash flows and cost control through critical path methodologies, risk analysis methods and current techniques for value engineering.


MCM-7911 credit

Construction Management Internship

To ensure competency in the field before graduation, each student must complete 400 hours of professional construction management experience with a firm in the building industry. This requirement may be waived for entering students with equal or greater professional experience. Additional requirements may apply; see program director or Career Services Office for more information.

Prerequisite: MCM 602, MCM-603, MCM-604


MCM-9013 credits

Masters Project

Construction managers today are part of a team-oriented enterprise, working in collaboration with architects, clients, developers and sub-contractors in the conceptualization and realization of the built environment. This independent study serves as the culminating experience in the program and requires the student to translate the design intentions of the architect and the expectations of the client into sustainable built form. Working in consultation with a committee of academic and professional advisors drawn from both architecture and construction, the student must choose a specific project and produce a comprehensive manual that addresses design concerns, sustainable systems and materials, construction methodologies as well as financial, legal, and safety standards operative in each phase of the construction process. An oral defense, supported by visual documentation realized via relevant digital technologies, will be presented for review and critique by a jury of committee members, faculty and students.

Prerequisites: MCM 602, MCM-603, MCM-604, MBA-625, SDN-601, SDN-603


MMW-7123 credits

Introduction to Health Policy

The focus of this required course is federal health-policy development, analysis and implementation and the role of the health-care provider in influencing health policy in the United States. The student will study public health policy to understand the basics of the policy-making process and to attain a beginning knowledge of how to influence health policies. The course will focus on women’s and infants’ health issues as examples of broader issues in health policy.


MMW-7203 credits

Critical Inquiry I
Critical Inquiry I is a required course that provides the foundations of research and critical inquiry as it applies to the evaluation of scientific evidence. The course will cover the following areas: the scientific method and its limitations; multiple ways of knowing; the ethics of research; defining problems, questions and hypotheses; conceptual analysis, constructs and theory building as they pertain to clinical practice and research. The course will provide an overview of the research process, and the student will apply this knowledge in the development of Chapters 1 and 2 of a research proposal. Midwifery contributions to the scientific literature will be highlighted as examples.


MMW-7213 credits

Critical Inquiry II
Critical Inquiry II is a required course that provides a special focus on research methods and their applications in clinical research and evidence-based practice. Steps in developing a research proposal, a research report and an evidence-based clinical protocol are presented. Students will be expected to continue their work on a problem or question relating to midwifery practice and/or women’s health, critically analyze the literature, place the issue in a theoretical context and develop an appropriate methodology to study the issue. Students may prepare a research proposal, a manuscript for publication, a grant proposal or an evidence-based clinical protocol for the final project. Or, the student may serve as a research apprentice to an experienced researcher working on midwifery or women’s health issue or as an intern to a national midwifery organization working on research-related projects that advance the profession of midwifery. Students may elect to continue their research and complete a Thesis in a three-credit elective course.

Prerequisite: MMW720


MMW-7223 credits

Introduction to Clinical Administration
This elective course provides students with the knowledge to understand the factors that influence the success and viability of nurse-midwifery practices. The effects of the changing health-care environment on primary health-care providers will be explored. Particular attention will be paid to current issues in the health-care system. The course will examine the startup of a clinical practice either as an entrepreneurial entity or within an existing organization. Emphasis will be placed on a beginning understanding of financial accounting statements and business plans used in the health-care industry. Students will explore the influence of political/economic milieus within and around the practice organization. In addition, students will learn practical techniques in order to develop beginning abilities in conflict resolution and contract negotiation.


MMW-7233 credits

Advanced Clinical Practice
This elective course is a guided independent study in advanced clinical practice. In consultation with the faculty, the student will identify a specific area of clinical practice (for example, caring for women with gestational diabetes). Intensive, focused study in this content area will be facilitated. Experiences relevant to the student’s area of interest will be sought in the clinical setting. Reflection on the student’s own transformation from novice to expert will be included.


MMW-7243 credits

Introduction to Teaching Methods

This elective course provides an introduction to teaching methods useful for midwifery educators in academic and clinical settings. Fundamentals of adult education will be reviewed. Concepts particular to midwifery education will be explored. Examination of how to identify and reach educational goals will be included for traditional models, distance education and in the clinical setting. The process of identification of student learning issues and problem solving will be included.


MMW-7253 credits

Issues in Reproductive Health in Developing Nations
This course will present current trends and the range/impact of problems in reproductive health in the developing world. Students will explore the context and consequences of reproductive health problems, common intervention strategies, and the critical role of health-care consultants to developing countries. The class will gain an understanding of the appropriate preparation, roles and responsibilities of international health-care consultants. As an outcome of this course, the student will be prepared to predict the potential impact of unmet reproductive health care needs in developing countries and evaluate proposed interventions.


MMW-7261.5 credits

Service Learning in Reproductive Health

This international excursion course will enhance student learning and contribute to global efforts to improve maternal-infant health. The experience will include a 1 week trip to a developing country in conjunction with an existing non-for-profit organization with strong ties to that country. Learning assignments related to this experience include preparation for the trip and will encourage reflection, develop leadership skills, and facilitate cultural sensitivity and humility during and after the trip. All students will be closely supervised by their Philadelphia University faculty during their experience and all relevant international rules and regulations will be followed.


MMW-7303 credits

Theoretical Foundations of Midwifery

This on-line course provides an overview of health promotion and counseling from theoretical and applied perspectives. The midwifery model of care will be introduced. We will discuss how the health of women and their families are influenced by a variety of factors. We will study theories of wellness and behavior change and explore public health and the role of the midwife. The development of graduate-level writing skills will be emphasized.


MMW-7313 credits

Evidence-Based Care: Evaluation Research

This required course provides the foundations of research and critical inquiry as it applies to the evaluation of scientific evidence. This course covers the following areas: the scientific method and its limitations; multiple ways of knowing; ethics of research; defining problems, questions, and hypotheses; conceptual analysis, constructs and theories as they pertain to clinical practice and research. The course will provide an overview of research methods and process, and the student will apply this knowledge in the preparation of a literature review relevant to midwifery practice. Midwifery contributions to the scientific literature will be highlighted as examples.


MMW-9313 credits

Thesis
Students may elect to conduct their own research and complete a thesis under faculty guidance using the most current Philadelphia University Guide For The Preparation Of Doctoral Dissertation And Master's Theses document. This elective course will be based on the proposal written in Critical Inquiry II.

Prerequisite: MMW-721


MSID-5003 credits

Skills and Methods for Industrial Design
An intensive summer workshop for matriculating industrial design graduate students, this course covers basic principles of design process and user research and goes on to cover shop and prototyping issues, as well as basic materials and process selection for manufacturing. A short-term design project is part of the course, but this class focuses on techniques and skills rather than the objects designed.


MSID-600A1 credit

Intercultural Innovation: Study Abroad Component

During a short interdisciplinary elective experience in a foreign country, students will observe and document cultural and demographic difference between countries through formal lectures, field observations and team exercises. The work in this class is informed by the use of user-based observational research techniques, which students will adapt and propose. Documentation is brought back to the US for use in the MSID-600B Intercultural Innovation: Interdisciplinary Project Component class. Students should plan on taking BOTH classes.


MSID-600B2 credits

Intercultural Innovation: Interdisciplinary Project Component
This is the second in a two-course interdisciplinary elective sequence. This class builds on work done in the MSID-600A Intercultural Innovation: Study Abroad Component course. Students should plan on taking BOTH classes. In MSID-600B, students bring research by interdisciplinary teams outside the US into well-documented opportunities for new products, business platforms or systems. In a series of team meetings and design critiques, they then turn them into cohesive proposals including both design and business elements.


MSID-7003 credits

Research and Design Process Methods

This course gives students the tools they need to find and frame opportunities, construct successful design briefs and to evaluate design in progress, as well as exploring and documenting new research techniques and defining basics of professional practice. Class projects will support studio work, as well as contributing to ongoing research initiatives.


MSID-7013 credits

Practice Tutorial
This course addresses specialized topics in professional practice relevant to graduate industrial design students. These include current approaches to intellectual property, professional ethics, contracts, management practices, and structures of practice and employment in the field.

In addition, students research fields within industrial design to identify potential career paths, plan and execute individual strategies for networking and interviewing, and prepare portfolio deliverables and other self-promotion materials in consultation with faculty and guest critics.


MSID-7036 credits

User-Centered Design
This course is the first in the MSID studio sequence. This studio concentrates on user-centered design techniques, including observational/ethnographic research methods and methods incorporating users and other stakeholders into the design process. Each studio will be expected to do extensive generative research and to publicize/archive its research and conclusions.

Prerequisite: MSID500


MSID-7043 credits

Workshop: Interactive Prototyping
This course addresses the need by industrial design professionals to create interactive, intelligent systems comprising both hardware and software components, to test, iterate, assess and defend these solutions based on principles of cognitive and physical human factors, and to create prototypes for evaluation through rapid-prototyping methods and technologies.

Through quick, iterative prototyping and testing of interfaces based on simple microcontrollers, this class teaches basic programming, integration of electronic sensors and outputs into tangible interfaces, and principles of testing and cognitive ergonomics for use in assessment of interactive interfaces. 


MSID-7056 credits

Collaborative Innovation Studio
This course is the second in the MSID studio sequence. This studio provokes interdisciplinary activity through a project centered on designed systems, which requires industrial design but requires inputs from other disciplines. Types of projects might include: ID + corporate brand experience, ID + materials science product development, products of service/business platform design, entrepreneurial design (design + business plan), software/hardware systems.

Prerequisite: MSID703


MSID-7073 credits

Current Issues In Industrial Design
In this class, students map and discuss the major influences on industrial design today, as well as modeling the lifetime learning and assessment of theory that are necessary for effective professional design and critique. The class is a seminar and is thematic rather than historical in focus. The reading list is expected to include blogs and periodicals, as well as books, and will change frequently.


MSID-791.5-3 credits

Internship
This course allows students to pursue direct experience in a company or organization that is actively engaged in design-related work. Students augment and enrich their overall education at the University by learning through direct work experience on design projects. Permission required, see program director or Career Services office for details.

Prerequisite: MSID 705


MSID-7983 credits

Independent Study
This course will allow students to pursue individual areas of interest while working jointly with a faculty member. Enrollment is subject to the availability and approval of both the program director and faculty member. The student must have 18 or more graduate-level credits, and a prospectus of the proposed independent study must be approved at least one month prior to registration. See appropriate form available online at Registrar’s website, www.philau.edu/registrar.


MSID-8036 credits

Master's Project 1: Implementation
The 2-semester Master’s project sequence stresses the importance of iterative prototyping and evaluation in current design practice by devoting two semesters to the ID Master’s Project. In this first project semester, students begin work with a team of collaborators within and outside the University.

Students have weekly progress critiques with studio faculty and other students, as well as regular meetings with outside project stakeholders. The semester concludes in a progress presentation with outside critics.

Prerequisite: MSID705


MSID-8046 credits

Master's Project 2: Development and Evaluation

The MSID master’s project sequence includes two courses. In this second semester, students work with collaborators and critics/clients within and outside the University to develop, detail and revise designs to a professional level, and to test their performance in the real world. Activities include weekly critiques with studio faculty and other students, as well as meetings with outside project stakeholders. The semester concludes with in-person defense of the work and a display at the CDEC Spring Design Show.

Prerequisite: MSID803


OCC-6101 credit

Portfolio Seminar

This course presents the concept of a professional portfolio, the initial step in guiding students’ professional development and socialization into the occupational therapy discipline. Students are introduced to the concepts of self-reflection, self-assessment and cultural competence. Through class activities and assignments with their portfolio clients, students learn how to interview and engage in the therapeutic process.

Prerequisite: All admissions prerequisite coursework


OCC-6113 credits

Foundations for Practice
Overview of occupational therapy theory and domains of practice, including practice roles and functions, regulatory and legislative mandates and constraints, historical and philosophical foundations, and ethics. 

Prerequisite: All admissions prerequisite coursework


OCC-6134 credits

Functional Anatomy
This course provides students with knowledge of structure and function of the human body and lays the foundation for an understanding of biomechanical and kinesiological concepts as they relate to human movement. Classroom and applied experiences address typical development of gross and fine motor skills, and concepts of motor control and motor learning through goniometry, manual muscle testing, and movement analysis. 

Prerequisite: All admissions prerequisite coursework


OCC-6162 credits

Assistive Technology Design
Working with students from the Industrial Design program, students collaborate to design an assistive device or tool to facilitate a client’s occupational performance. Through field experiences, teaching-learning activities, discussion, and experiential assignments, students examine their evolving understanding of occupation, adaptation, and participation. Course activities include applying the principles of task analysis and universal design, and critically analyzing and synthesizing evaluation data. The culminating course project assists students to gain professional development experience and insight through the presentation of findings in a consumer-oriented forum.

Prerequisite: OCC-621


OCC-6213 credits

Occupational Competence

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the psychological, social, cultural, and biological dimensions of occupational performance across the lifespan and in consideration of typical developmental milestones. Through case-based activities, students operationalize the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, master techniques of task analysis, and explore concepts of meaning in regard to occupation. Occupational competence and its role in health and ill health are examined, along with the impact of the physical, social and cultural environments on occupational choice. Students practice using occupation as an intervention through design of occupation-based intervention kits.


OCC-6234 credits

Applied Neuroanatomy
In-depth exploration of the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, neurophysiological, cognitive, motor and sensorimotor basis of brain function as it relates to human performance. Identification of major structures and functions of normal and abnormal nervous systems. Development of an understanding of the neurobiological substrates of behavior and learning. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship of neuroanatomy to human movement, problem solving and executive functions.

Prerequisites: OCC613


OCC-6251 credit

Clinical Skills A

Students learn clinical skills most typically used in various practice contexts of occupational therapy. Course includes development of competencies in safe clinical practices, occupational therapy terminology, and documentation for skilled occupational therapy service. Skills are practiced in hands-on laboratory environments and then applied through Level I Fieldwork.


OCC-626 (formerly OCC-744)3 credits

Evidence-Based Practice

This course helps students to become skillful consumers of research for the purposes of evidence-building and assessing outcomes of occupational therapy. Students are introduced to the research perspective and evidence-based practice as a basis for professional competence. Utilizing the critical appraisal process, students critique and analyze the literature to answer clinical practice questions. Course experiences include examining the basic research elements of single subject, experimental, quasi-experimental and qualitative research studies; considering ethical issues of research; developing and answering complex clinical questions; and planning, presenting and disseminating research findings.

Prerequisite: OCC611


OCC-6281 credit

Introduction to Evaluation

Occupational therapists use the evaluation process to develop a clear understanding of a client's occupational performance issues. The process sets the stage for client-centered practice by establishing strengths, needs, goals, and barriers to client functioning. Therapists use evaluation results not only for treatment planning, but also to communicate with clients, caregivers, other professionals and payers. This course will help students to select, critique and project evaluation clinical utility. Course content will also address how evaluation leads to OT intervention. (1 credit; delivered primarily online.)


OCC-6351 credit

Clinical Skills B

Students learn clinical skills most typically used in various practice contexts of occupational therapy. Course includes development of competencies in safe clinical practices for mobility devices, monitoring and documenting vital signs, adherence to cardiac precautions, adapted self-care activities, joint protection and energy conservation. Skills are practiced in hands-on laboratory environments and then applied through Level I Fieldwork.

Prerequisite: OCC625


OCC-6451 credit

Clinical Skills C

Students learn clinical skills most typically used in various practice contexts of occupational therapy. Course includes development of competencies in safe clinical practices for physical agent modalities (PAMs), fabrication and application of splinting devices, and wound care. Skills are practiced in hands-on laboratory environments and then applied through Level I Fieldwork.

Prerequisite: OCC613


OCC-7351 credit

Level I Fieldwork A

The overall purpose of the fieldwork experience is to provide students with exposure to clinical practice through observation and active participation in the evaluation and treatment process. The opportunity to work with clients and therapists helps students to examine their reactions to clients, themselves and other personnel while integrating academic learning with clinical practice. The focus of the learning experience will be the application of knowledge and skills learned through coursework to include observation, written and verbal communication, professional behavior, individual and group participation with patients and clients, and beginning level assessment and intervention. At the completion of Level I Fieldwork experiences the student will demonstrate beginning-level competency on a series of clinical skills.

Prerequisite: OCC621, OCC625


OCC-7385 credits

Psychosocial Interventions

Occupational therapy assessment and intervention approaches as they apply to individuals whose lives have been affected by psychiatric illness, developmental delay, disease, trauma and/or disability are explored. Students will link theory to an in-depth analysis of the social and psychological properties of intervention strategies. Course content will incorporate consultative models, documentation strategies and client and caregiver teaching methods.

Prerequisites: OCC621


OCC-7413 credits

Interpersonal Relations and Groups

Interpersonal skills and communication are critical for building effective professional relationships with clients, team members, families and the community–at–large. Students will explore the dynamics of collaboration including their own communication styles and how to enhance therapeutic use of self as an intervention tool. Designing occupation-based groups for therapeutic intervention will be explored, as will dynamics of implementing group strategies for education and/or advocacy. 

Prerequisite: OCC621


OCC-7451 credit

Level I Fieldwork B

The overall purpose of the fieldwork experience is to provide students with exposure to clinical practice through observation and active participation in the evaluation and treatment process. The opportunity to work with clients and therapists helps students to examine their reactions to clients, themselves and other personnel while integrating academic learning with clinical practice. The focus of the learning experience will be the application of knowledge and skills learned through coursework to include observation, written and verbal communication, professional behavior, individual and group participation with patients and clients, and beginning level assessment and intervention. At the completion of Level I Fieldwork experiences the student will demonstrate beginning-level competency on a series of clinical skills.

Prerequisite: OCC621, OCC625


OCC-7485 credits

Assessment and Intervention: Adults

Occupational therapy assessment process and intervention approaches as they apply to individuals whose lives have been affected by disease, trauma and/or disability with primary focus on physiological, musculoskeletal or neurological impairments and medical conditions. In-depth analysis of the physical, social, cognitive, and psychological properties of intervention strategies. Hands-on techniques, documentation strategies, patient/client and caregiver teaching and theoretical constructs are explored. 

Prerequisites: OCC613, OCC621, OCC623


OCC-7513 credits

Professional Issues and Trends

In-depth examination of issues affecting practice, reimbursement, role delineation, professional autonomy and the changing human services system in the United States. OT-specific issues regarding ethics, staff development, program evaluation, advocacy and health policy will be addressed. Strategic and program planning, legislative imperatives, resource utilization and use of outcomes data for program planning and justification are presented.

Prerequisites: OCC738, OCC748


OCC-7543 credits

Environmental Dimensions of Occupation

In-depth exploration of the physical, social, cognitive, and psychological dimensions of the environment. Impact of the environment on behavior and the individual’s ability to mount an adaptive response will be examined. Students will complete environmental assessments and will learn to design and construct environmental adaptations. Historical and theoretical basis for physical and social adaptations is explored.

Prerequisites: OCC621


OCC-7551 credit

Level I Fieldwork C

The overall purpose of the fieldwork experience is to provide students with exposure to clinical practice through observation and active participation in the evaluation and treatment process. The opportunity to work with clients and therapists helps students to examine their reactions to clients, themselves and other personnel while integrating academic learning with clinical practice. The focus of the learning experience will be the application of knowledge and skills learned through coursework to include observation, written and verbal communication, professional behavior, individual and group participation with patients and clients, and beginning level assessment and intervention. At the completion of Level I Fieldwork experiences the student will demonstrate beginning-level competency on a series of clinical skills.
Prerequisite: OCC621, OCC625


OCC-7573 credits

Innovative Practice in Occupational Therapy
This course offers an in-depth exploration of emerging arenas for occupational therapy practice. Issues regarding program development, financial and human resource management, outcomes measurement, advocacy, stakeholder collaboration, and health policy will be addressed. Students will work in small groups to examine the interrelationships of person, environment and occupation within communities and populations.


OCC-7585 credits

Assessment and Intervention: Children & Youth

Students explore occupational therapy assessment and intervention approaches as they apply to children and youth whose lives have been affected by complex developmental, physical, cognitive and neurological disorders. Students will conduct an in-depth analysis of the physical, social, and psychosocial contexts in which intervention strategies occur. Hands-on techniques, consultative models, reimbursement and practice domain challenges/opportunities, documentation strategies, client and caregiver education, family-centered care and theoretical constructs are explored. Adaptive equipment, assistive devices, and emerging technology are examined. Learning activities help students to develop a repertoire of strategies to observe and assess children and youth, develop collaborative team skills, design intervention plans, refine their activity analysis skills, and identify the theoretical relevance for assessment tools, assistive devices and intervention strategies.

Prerequisites: OCC613, OCC621, OCC623


OCC-7651 credit

Clinical Applications (formerly Level 1 Fieldwork D)

Students develop competencies in safe clinical practice by applying clinical skills in hands-on laboratory environments, and then to clients in a structured setting.

Prerequisites: OCC-621, OCC-625


OCC-7662 credits

Older Adults: Enabling Participation

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the impact of aging on health, well-being, and participation in older adults. Impact of normal aging, changing health status, role transition, memory and life review, retirement/leisure pursuits, wellness, and end of life issues are explored. Consultative models, and practice domain challenges/ opportunities are reviewed.

Prerequisites: OCC-613, OCC-623


OCC-7683 credits

Specialty Practice: Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

Students learn the clinical reasoning process that guides occupational therapy upper extremity rehabilitation with a focus on assessment, goal setting, treatment planning and documentation strategies. The practical, philosophical and theoretical bases for intervention are reviewed for the following advanced practice techniques: physical agent modalities (PAMs), kinesiotaping, joint mobilization, static and dynamic splinting, post-surgical techniques, and upper quadrant interventions. The need for advanced certification as well as parameters for referral to and/or collaboration with other disciplines will be explored.

Prerequisites: OCC645, OCC748


OCC-7702 credits

Practice Platform Seminar

This course supports students in their final culminating project of the academic program, presentation of the Master’s Portfolio. During this capstone course, students describe the development of their own critical thinking, assess current practice knowledge and skills, and identify constructs for their future professional practice. Through classroom and on-line learning activities that involve self-reflection on collected experiences over the program, students are guided to define their practice philosophy.

Prerequisites: OCC626, OCC738, OCC748


OCC-7713 credits

Level II Fieldwork A (Credit/No Credit)

The fieldwork component of the curriculum provides students with an in-depth experience in the practice and application of the occupational therapy process. Students will apply the knowledge, skills and clinical reasoning gained through classroom, experiential and self-directed learning experiences to achieve entry-level practice competence. Students complete two full time, 12-week fieldwork placements following successful completion of assessment and intervention coursework. Successful completion of the fieldwork education component is a requirement for graduation from the Occupational Therapy Program.

Prerequisites: Complete a minimum of 52 OCC credits


OCC-775 (Formerly OCC-773)1.5 credits

Clinical Reasoning I

Content includes the analysis of critical thinking constructs that inform daily practice decisions and reflection on practice decisions. Evidence-based practice approaches, clinical reasoning concepts, and self-reflection are taught through student case presentations.

Corequisite: OCC771


OCC-7813 credits

Level II Fieldwork B (Credit/No Credit)

The fieldwork component of the curriculum provides students with an in-depth experience in the practice and application of the occupational therapy process. Students will apply the knowledge, skills and clinical reasoning gained through classroom, experiential and self-directed learning experiences to achieve entry-level practice competence. Students complete two full time, 12-week fieldwork placements following successful completion of assessment and intervention coursework. Successful completion of the fieldwork education component is a requirement for graduation from the Occupational Therapy Program.

Prerequisites: Complete a minimum of 52 OCC credits


OCC-7841 credit

Mastery

This course requires the integration of previously acquired knowledge and clinical skills. Students will review the clinical reasoning process that guides the occupational therapy evaluation, goal setting, treatment planning and documentation, and discuss the philosophical and theoretical bases for intervention across the practice continuum. Through case discussion and self-testing, students will become familiar with the domains tested on the certification exam, assess readiness, and develop a plan of study.


Prerequisites: OCC738, OCC748, OCC758


OCC-785 (Formerly OCC-773)1.5 credits

Clinical Reasoning II

Content includes the analysis of critical thinking constructs that inform daily practice decisions. Students will continue to develop and utilize clinical reasoning concepts to reflect on practice decisions implemented during Level II Fieldwork. 

Corequisite: OCC781


OCC-7971-3 credits

Special Topics

Special Topics
Prerequisites: OCC611 or permission of instructor


PAS-6118 credits

Clinical Medicine

This lecture course uses an organ-system organization to present an overview of the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation and management of common diseases encountered in primary care. The course includes modules in: epidemiology, infectious disease, cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, hematology/oncology, endocrinology, nephrology, urology, rheumatology, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology (ENT) and psychiatry. Principles of health promotion and disease prevention are also presented.

Prerequisites: PASF507GR, PASF513 GR, PASF517.
Corequisite: PAS612


PAS-6122 credits

Clinical Reasoning

This seminar course uses clinical case studies and role-playing to guide students in developing directed history and physical examination, clinical reasoning, case presentation and patient counseling skills. Research methods and reviewing the medical literature are also presented.

Prerequisites: PASF507GR, PASF513 GR, PASF517
Corequisite: PAS611


PAS-6134 credits

Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics
This lecture and case study seminar course is designed to introduce students to the principles of pharmacology, including the absorption, bioavailability, distribution, metabolism, excretion, classification and mechanism of action of commonly prescribed medications. Additionally, this course will give students an understanding of how drugs are used in clinical practice, including the clinical indications, contraindications, dosing, side effects and monitoring of commonly used medications.

Prerequisites: PASF507 GR, PASF513 GR, PASF521 GR


PAS-6143 credits

Emergency Medicine
This lecture and laboratory course encompasses emergent presentations and management of common primary care and emergency-care problems. Laboratory sessions cover procedures necessary for the delivery of emergency medical care. This course also includes limited emergency room patient exposure with written assignments.

Prerequisites: PASF507GR, PASF513 GR, PASF517


PAS-6152 credits

Laboratory Medicine
In this lecture and laboratory course, the utilization and interpretation of commonly used diagnostic and clinical laboratory studies such as X-rays, electrocardiograms and blood studies are reviewed.

Prerequisites: PASF507 GR, PASF513 GR, PASF521 GR


PAS-6216 credits

Clinical Disciplines Overview
During this lecture and workshop course, the physician-assistant student is introduced to the basic principles of diagnosis and treatment in the medical disciplines of pediatrics, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology. The female and male reproductive system examination workshop is also a component of this course.

Prerequisites: PASF507GR, PASF513 GR, PASF517, PASF521 GR, PAS613, PAS615


PAS-6221 credit

Pharmacotherapeutics Seminar
This course will use small-group, case-study, problem-based seminars to demonstrate the practical utilization of medications in the clinical setting. Prescription writing, dosing, titration and ongoing monitoring will be the focus of the course.

Prerequisite: PAS613


PAS-6231 credit

Advanced Radiology/ECG Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
This seminar course builds upon the foundation of knowledge in chest X-ray, abdominal X-ray, bone X-ray and ECG interpretation developed in the PAS614 and PAS615 courses. CAT scans of the head are also reviewed. Students will recognize common disease patterns as seen on these studies.

Prerequisites: PAS614, PAS615


PAS-6243 credits

Biomedical Literature and Research

Basic statistics, research methods, epidemiology, the structure of writing used in medical research and the principles of evidence-based medicine are reviewed in this course. Students will have the opportunity to review current medical research and evaluate it with regard to its application to medical practice.
Prerequisites: PAS612 

Clinical Rotations                                                       36 credits

6 Rotations (6 credits/rotation)

The physician assistant student will complete six (5- to 6-week) rotations.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete ALL didactic or classroom courses in the physician assistant program (except PAS771) and be in good academic standing prior to proceeding to any Clinical Rotations or Preceptorships 

PAS741                                                                              6 credits

Internal Medicine Clinical Rotation

PAS742                                                                              6 credits

Pediatrics Clinical Rotation

PAS743                                                                              6 credits

Women’s Health Clinical Rotation

PAS744                                                                              6 credits

Psychiatry/Mental Health Clinical Rotation

PAS745                                                                              6 credits

Surgery Clinical Rotation

PAS746                                                                              6 credits

Emergency Medicine Clinical Rotation

Preceptorships                                                           24 credits

Preceptorships (6 credits/preceptorship)

Two five- to six-week preceptorships must be done in an ambulatory primary-care setting. The remaining preceptorship experiences include the Primary Care Selective, in which students do five additional weeks in a medically related specialty such as family, internal or geriatric medicine, and the clinical elective. During the elective students can spend more time in one of their rotation specialties, or gain experience in other settings such as neonatology, HIV, correctional medicine, urology, orthopedic surgery, cardiothoracic surgery and others.

PAS759                                                                              6 credits

Preceptorship IA: Primary Care 1

PAS760                                                                              6 credits

Preceptorship IB: Primary Care 2

PAS763                                                                              6 credits

Preceptorship IIA: Floating Medicine Block

PAS764                                                                              6 credits

Preceptorship IIB: Elective

PAS771                                                                              3 credits

PA Master’s Comprehensive Experience

Competency Evaluation                        (Credit/No Credit)

This course, which takes place throughout the entire clinical year, is the capstone experience of the PA program. It consists of two components: an independent project that includes either an applied-research project, extensive literature research with the preparation of a review article for submission to a professional journal, a PA education/instruction experience, or a community health-education project. It will be developed with, and supervised by, a faculty advisor and include an extensive literature review, integration of knowledge acquired throughout the curriculum, a written assignment and an oral presentation. The course also includes a multi-faceted summative evaluation/assessment procedure consisting of: a comprehensive written examination that encompasses topics drawn from the entire PA Program curriculum; and a series of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) using standardized patients where students must demonstrate: eliciting a medical history, performing a physical examination, ordering appropriate ancillary studies, formulating a diagnosis, developing a management plan, rendering patient education and documenting the findings, all as appropriate to the clinical cases presented. Students must successfully pass the independent project and the multi-faceted evaluation procedure in order to complete the requirements for this course and the master’s degree.

Prerequisite: All PA professional phase didactic courses


PASF-507 (A-2 crds) (B-3crds) GR5 credits

Advanced Anatomy

This lecture and laboratory course will review basic histology along with the major anatomical structures of the human using a regional organization. Laboratory sessions utilizing microscopic examination, models and cadaver specimen dissection will augment lecture material.


PASF-513 GR3 credits

Medical Physiology and Pathophysiology

This lecture course is designed to teach the principles of human medical physiology along with the physiological mechanisms of common disease states.


PASF-511 GR3 credits

Applied Behavioral Science

The topics of developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, human sexuality, stress responses, behaviors related to psychological health and illness and the diagnosis and management of common psychological disorders are the focus of this lecture course.


PASF-517 GR5 credits

Medical History and Physical Diagnosis

This lecture and practical laboratory course will introduce the physician assistant student to the techniques for eliciting a medical history and performing a complete physical examination on humans. The interpretation of history and physical examination findings as applicable to physiological and disease states will also be discussed. Laboratory sessions, hospital experiences and writing assignments will enhance the learning experience.


PASF-510 GR2 credits

Medical and Professional Ethics

Understanding the philosophical principles related to biomedical ethics, patient-practitioner relationships, health policy and the role of the physician assistant provider within the health care system are the main topics encompassed in this lecture and discussion seminar course.


PASF-521 GR2 credits

Medical Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology

This lecture course presents current concepts and issues in medical genetics, immunology and microbiology. It focuses on diseases of genetic origin, the function of the immune system and emerging trends in disorders caused by microorganisms.


SDN/SDNX-6013 credits

Sustainable Design Methodologies
Sustainability is a cultural phenomenon that is reshaping the way architects, engineers, designers and planners conceive of the built environment. This lecture/seminar course will explore changes in culture over the years that have led to the formation and adoption of contemporary sustainable design practices, technologies and processes. Current aspects of sustainability will be explored including the impact of the LEED rating system, legislation, environmental law, corporate culture evolution, integrated design process, energy modeling and economic impacts of land development. Students will complete a final paper on future directions in sustainable design at the end of the course.


SDN/SDNX-602

3-0-3

Adaptive Design
An introduction to quantitative criteria that define adaptive responses as instrumental characteristics of design based on human comfort, program, climate and site. Investigations will seek an understanding of the reciprocity between competing (and often contradictory) design forces, such as theoretical versus real, dynamic versus static, spatial and numerical, energy gain and loss. An awareness of the function of scientific instruments for measurements and performance assessments on buildings and outdoor spaces on real sites with the goal of achieving human comfort will be explored. Students will propose design interventions in accordance with their experimental data and use simulation tools to assess ultimate performance of the intervention.


SDN/SDNX-603

3 credits

Sustainable Systems

This course will provide a thorough understanding of sustainable building systems in order to optimize energy efficiency and minimize environmental pollution while maintaining human comfort resulting in a holistically designed building that is non-polluting and energy efficient. Students will complete a series of case studies and a final project


SDN/SDNX-604

3 credits

Green Materials

A key requirement to completing a successful sustainable design project is a careful consideration of the environmental and energy performance impacts of construction materials. Students will begin the course by learning how to complete a life cycle analysis for materials.


SDN/SDNX-606

3 credits

Development of Sustainable Buildings

This lecture course will educate students on all aspects of sustainable development ranging from construction startup to project financing to management of green construction. Students will learn techniques of cost benefit analysis including such aspects as impact of zoning and code ordinance for green projects to understanding tax incentives for such projects. Students will complete case studies and finish the semester with a completed proposal for a sustainable project.


SDN-611

6 credits

Sustainable Design Studio I

This studio will emphasize interdisciplinary learning as a fundamental core concept of sustainable design. Students will be challenged to work collaboratively on a series of design projects that foster creativity, ingenuity and innovation as key components of effective sustainable design.

Prerequisites: SDN 601


SDNX-6113 credits

Sustainable Design Studio I

This is the first of two studios that will emphasize interdisciplinary teaching and learning as a fundamental core concept of sustainable design. Students in this studio will be challenged to work collaboratively on the development of a comprehensive project brief that outlines and defines the ethical foundation of a sustainable design project. Students will then participate in an integrated design process leading towards the creation of a Schematic design for a highly performing sustainable project.


SDNX-6123 credits

Sustainable Design Studio II

This is the second of two studios that emphasizes interdisciplinary teaching and learning as a fundamental core concept of sustainable design. Students will be challenged to work both collaboratively and independently on a series of short simulation, validation and optimization projects that foster ingenuity and innovation as key components of effective sustainable design.


SDN-615

3 credits

The Sustainable Organization Primer

This lecture/seminar course will provide a thorough understanding of the different components necessary to build and maintain a 21st century sustainable organizations. This course will explore the role of diversity, impact of environment, green supply chain management, and branding/rebranding strategies as core components of companies seeking to reach the triple bottom line: Environment, Equity and Enterprise.

Prerequisites: SDN601


SDN-702

3 credits

Energy and Carbon Modeling

Intelligent sustainable design considers the impact of buildings and business processes on global energy fuel types, consumption and carbon flows. The purpose of this course is to understand building energy modeling and enterprise carbon reporting. Students will create a schematic-level energy model and generate a carbon report using commercially available software and industry standard protocols. Student teams will explain, calculate and analyze design exercises, individual and group case studies and a final design project.

Prerequisite: SDN 603


SDN-703

3 credits

Building Simulation II

This advanced elective course will build upon the first Building Simulation course to explore more complex and technically demanding simulation software packages including DOE2. Students will complete a series of short exercises designed to develop specific modeling skills. The students will go on to develop sophisticated energy and daylight models for a proposed building and generate a comprehensive report on the results of the simulations. This course is geared towards engineers.

Prerequisite: SDN 702


SDN-704

3 credits

Tensile Structures

As architects continue to seek innovative ways to create outdoor microclimates and indoor modification of light and air, tensile structures provide a unique and effective opportunity to achieve these goals. This course will begin by introducing students to the history of tensile structures and move on to contemporary applications of this technology. Students will go on to design and build small scale tensile structures to solve specific micro-climate responses. These constructions may be used in conjunction with the Green Design Build course.


SDN-710

3 credits

Green Design Build

This elective course focuses on actual design and implementation of sustainable materials and technologies on a small scale construction project. Students may plug into a real project under construction or design and create their own structures for a particular site or client. Experts from around the region will be brought in as guests to assist with the process.

Prerequisite: SDN 601


SDN-791

0-3 credits

Sustainability Internship

This course allows students to pursue direct experience in a company or organization that is actively engaged in sustainability work. Students augment and enrich their overall education at the University by learning lessons of sustainability through direct work experience on sustainable projects. Permission required, see program director or Career Services office for details.

Prerequisite: SDN-601


SDN-791

3 credits

Practicum in Sustainable Design, Engineering or Construction

Students are required to complete a minimum of 8 weeks of real world experience on a project as overseen by an approved mentor on the project. In addition, students must prepare two research papers on the impact of sustainable design upon mainstream design and construction practices. Lastly, students will complete a portfolio that details their experiences and quantify the knowledge, skills and design synthesis experience gained in the practicum.


SDN-900

3 credits

Thesis in Sustainable Design I

This seminar is the first of a two-term sequence of courses focused on independent research, inquiry design exploration and synthesis. Weekly seminars, interactions with faculty members help to inform student research and lead to the development of a comprehensive thesis project. This course will include class based guidance on the conceptualization, analysis and execution of an individually based thesis defined by methods of inquiry necessary to the interdisciplinary nature of sustainability. Emphasis will be placed on the reciprocal relationship between the research and design processes. Advanced building simulation tools and other quantitative measurements will be integral part of those processes.

Prerequisites: SDN 611


SDN-901

6 credits

Thesis in Sustainable Design II

This studio course is the second in a two-term sequence and will focus on the continuation and completion of the project begun in the previous semester. Students will be required to focus on specific details and features of their project. If agreed to by the program director, students will present their final project in a public forum and generate a final “book” (using the most current Philadelphia University Guide For The Preparation Of Doctoral Dissertation And Master’s Theses document) that includes all of the work completed during the studio sequence. For a building design project, students will be required to present their building simulation results as part of the final requirements for graduation.

Prerequisites: SDN 900


SDNF-5003 credits

This course provides a common foundation in the design of the built environment for on-design students. Topics include the creation of new designs for the built environment, applying graphic communication skills to create design documents, and synthesizing basic construction techniques into design projects. Students will complete multiple design projects which increase in complexity and independence.


SDNF-5013 credits

This course provides a common foundation for students without experience in the built environment. Topics include vocabulary, understanding and reading architectural and landscape drawings, how to create architectural drawings, experience in the design process, construction assemblies and the presentation of project material.


TAX-6603 credits

Individual Taxation

This course is a study of federal tax law as it pertains to individuals. It emphasizes the determination of gross income, deductions and credits, tax accounting and timing principles, realization and recognition of gains and losses, and standards of tax practice and ethical concerns. Students gain an awareness of history and tax policy considerations behind various Internal Revenue Code provisions.


TAX-6623 credits

Corporation Taxation

This course will provide students with knowledge concerning organization, capital structure, gross income and deductions, dividends, accumulated earnings tax, personal holding tax and stock redemptions.


TAX-6643 credits

Tax Research

This course enhances the student’s ability to identify tax issues, locate and evaluate the legal authority relevant to those issues and effectively communicate, both orally and in written form, the conclusions and recommendations from their research. Electronic (computer) research will be taught in a hands-on setting. Students will gain an awareness of issues in federal tax practice and procedure, including ethical concerns for tax professionals.

Prerequisites: TAX660, TAX662


TAX-7633 credits

Financial Planning

This course will cover all aspects of financial planning including income tax planning, estate tax planning and strategies, gift tax, insurance planning, investment strategies, planning for the elderly and planning for survivors.


TAX-7653 credits

Taxation of Flow-Through Entities

This course provides an in-depth study of flow-through entities including S corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies. Emphasis will be focused on student’s understanding of the tax statutes, court cases and practice techniques related to the concept of “choice of entity.” This course creates an awareness of the potential consequences of choosing a particular form of entity. Topics covered include formation, operation, and dissolution of S corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies.


TAX-7703 credits

Business Tax Planning

This course explains the various types of entities, types of compensation, fringe benefits and liquidation of each type of entity such as proprietorships, partnerships, corporations and 1120S corporations.


TAX-7713 credits

Advanced Individual Taxation

This course is a continuation of TAX660 - Individual Taxation and is intended as a comprehensive continuation of advanced topics for individuals. In addition to federal taxes, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware state tax regulations will be covered.

Prerequisite: TAX660


TAX-7783 credits

Current Issues in Taxation and Accounting

This course will update students in various tax and accounting topics. Topics will include new development at the IRS and in areas such as individual taxation, business taxation, financial planning, business tax planning, multi-state tax issues, estate taxation and accounting and auditing pronouncements.


TAX-7823 credits

Tax Accounting

This course will review accounting methods and periods, installment method, long-term contracts and changes in accounting methods.


TAX-7893 credits

Taxation of Real Estate Transactions

This course emphasizes the income tax aspects of acquiring, operating and disposing of investment and personal real estate. Detailed consideration of deductions, conventional and creative financing techniques, foreclosures and repossessions, subdivision, sales/leaseback transactions, tax-deferred exchanges, involuntary conversions, and sale of principal residence.


TAX-7913 credits

Internship

Internships provide students with an opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge they have gained in the classroom. Under faculty supervision, students work in salaried positions related to their career goals. While on their assignments, students develop meaningful learning objectives, attend an internship seminar, complete challenging assignments, and write bi-weekly reports analyzing articles in academic journals and practitioner publications.

Prerequisites: Minimum of 18 graduate credits completed (excluding foundation courses); available to full-time students only and subject to availability and eligibility; permission required, see Program Director or Career Services Office for more information. 


TAX-7933 credits

State and Local Taxation —Individual and Corporations

Emphasis will be placed on individual and corporate tax problem areas in the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. Gross receipts and sales tax will also be covered.


TAX-7943 credits

IRS Tax Procedures

A complete review of audit, collection and appeal procedures conducted by the Internal Revenue Service will be examined by the students.


TAX-7953 credits

Estate and Gift Taxation

This course will review mainly the estate and gift tax returns, such as preparation and problem areas. Deductions, income, annuities and taxable transfers will be discussed.


TAX-7971-3 credits

Selected Topics
Content will vary in response to current issues.


TAX-7983 credits

Independent Study

This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue areas of interest while working jointly with a faculty member. Subject to availability and approval required, see appropriate form online on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


TES-9013 credits

Preliminary Examination Preparation

This course is intended for Ph.D. students who have completed their coursework, but who have not yet passed both parts of the qualifying examination. Students will meet with their advisor on an independent basis and will be given guidance and practice examinations to prepare for the doctoral-qualifying examination.


TES-9026 credits

Thesis I

Doctoral students will form the doctoral committee and complete formulation of the thesis topic. Literature review and research of the proposed topic. Oral presentation and written submission of thesis proposal will be made to the student’s doctoral committee.


TES-9039 credits

Dissertation Research I

This course is intended only for those students who have achieved Ph.D.-candidacy status. Seminal and original research will be conducted with a goal of preparing and defending a doctoral dissertation.

Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral candidacy


TES-9043 credits

Dissertation Research II

This course is intended only for those students who have achieved Ph.D.-candidacy status. Seminal and original research will be conducted with a goal of preparing and defending a doctoral dissertation.

Prerequisite: TES903


TES-9066 credits

Thesis II

Completion and oral presentation of thesis work to the graduate faculty of Philadelphia University. Submission of the written thesis using the most current Philadelphia University Guide For The Preparation Of Doctoral Dissertation And Master’s Theses document.

Prerequisites: TES904


TXD-6153 credits

Design Studio IA

Focuses on design research as an essential beginning for textile design studio work. Students in all concentrations will work on common projects and, toward the end of the semester, take their research work into design work specific to their concentration.


TXD-616/TXD-6176 credits

Design Studio IB & IC

This initial course will be delivered through lecture/studio sessions and will ensure that the student gains increasingly advanced knowledge of the technical/design aspects of knit, print or weave design. Within TXD616 and TXD617, projects will be devised to integrate the knowledge and practice gained through design and technical courses, with the development of individual creative design work in the chosen concentration (knit, weave or print).


TXD-6250 credits

Seminar (Credit/No Credit)

Weekly seminars will be arranged during the first semester, to which visiting speakers will be invited to give presentations on topics covering the national and international perspectives of marketing, technology and design in textile and related activities. Student participation will be expected during these seminars.


TXD-6653 credits

Design Management

The aim of this course is to create an awareness of the factors involved in the process of innovation and design, and the importance of establishing a policy and strategy, which will ensure that the design process is effectively promoted and managed to assist in the achievement of organizational goals. At the end of the course, students will be able to: (a) relate the process of design to corporate and product strategy; (b) describe the nature of the tasks undertaken by industrial innovators and designers; (c) prepare a brief for a design project; and (d) monitor and evaluate the progress of a design project. They will also become aware of (a) the contribution made to the design process by systematic techniques such as value analysis and by specialist support staff; (b) the factors affecting creativity and innovation; (c) the link between product and manufacturing system design; and (d) the legal protections offered to designers.


TXD-742/TXD-743/TXD-7449 credits

Design Studio II

Studio work involving advanced-level technical/creative projects in the chosen design concentration (as in Design Studio I), and the opportunity for interdisciplinary work encouraging knit/print, weave/print or weave/knit coordination, will be carried out in the first part of the semester. Student design work at this point should progress from assigned projects to independent, student-directed work. Toward the end of the semester, reviews of student work will lead to the selection of a “major project.” The aims and outcomes of this project will be written up in detail for submission to a faculty review committee. This project will form the basis of the final semester’s design work, thesis report and student exhibit for graduation.


TXD-7493 credits

Weave Technology II

The variations, functions, auxiliary devices and design characteristics of dobby and Jacquard looms and the equipment used to support the weaving process will be studied. Calculations relating to production and materials will be considered, along with the accurate analysis of fabrics for weight and cover. Consideration will be given to size, texture, fiber type, weave and other fabric parameters. Advanced multilayered weaves will also be studied.


TXD-7503 credits

Knitting Technology

A further investigation into the construction, design and production of both weft- and warp-knitted fabrics. Lectures will be complemented with lab work involving the design, production and analysis of knit fabric upon power-knitting equipment.


TXD-7563 credits

Advanced Jacquard

The design and production of Jacquard fabrics will be studied. Students analyze designs and produce complex fabrics on commercial equipment using computerized design and production systems.


TXD-772/TXD-773/TXD-7748 credits

Design Studio III

(a)   Project        

The major project worked on independently by students during this final semester will be chosen to show the student’s range of creative and technical ability. It will be concerned with a specialized area within their design concentration. Each project will be required to encompass:

  1. Design ideas and extensive sketchbook development            
  2. Market research and technical notebooks
  3. Print Croquis and/or fabrics in sample form, product rendered designs           
  4. Final Exhibit              

The student will be expected to mount a personal design exhibit showing the range of his/her abilities in knit, weave or print design. The work will be professionally presented and displayed for judging by a panel of design faculty. An important outcome of this exhibit will be the opportunity for key industrial people to visit, and for possible career opportunities to result. A secondary outcome will be its inspirational impact on undergraduate design students within the University.


TXD-7763 credits

Textile Printing Technology

This is a specialized and practical course in the principles, techniques and chemical processes involved in the printing of textiles. The chemistry and use of different dye classes and pigment systems; application printing; discharge, burnout and other styles; and the influence of thickeners, cloth preparation and fixation processes on quality and colorfastness are examined.


TXD-7773 credits

This course focuses on both the conceptual and technical aspects of digital portfolio presentation for the textile designer. Students will use interactive media to create both a CD-ROM portfolio and a personal website. Course projects provide an in-depth exploration of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and multimedia design software. Students must have a clear understanding of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator before enrolling in this course.


TXD-7803 credits

Advanced Drawing: Materials & Techniques

This course is designed to further develop the design student’s drawing abilities and creative thought process, while encouraging conceptual development and a deeper understanding of contemporary issues in art and design. This course will provide an in-depth exploration of line, color and materials using a variety of drawing tools while introducing a more conceptual approach to drawing. Students will participate in off-campus trips to galleries and museums.

Prerequisite: DRAW-101 or VSDRW-101 (or equivalent) or permission from instructor


TXD-7983 credits

Independent Study

Students may select an independent project or research topic. Approval is required; see appropriate form online on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information. 


TXD-9751 credit

Thesis (Credit/no credit)

The design work encompassed through the major project needs to be submitted in thesis form, three copies of which are to remain at the University. The thesis should contain written material relative to the design inspiration, technical development and production process, and yet students are encouraged to include visual imagery relevant to their work and design development as evidence of their design capabilities. This course will assist final-semester students working toward the production of their thesis document using the most current Philadelphia University Guide For The Preparation Of Doctoral Dissertation And Master’s Theses document. In addition to the bound thesis, other media presentations of their final project will be explored.

Prerequisite: TXD744


TXD-9933 credits

European Textile Print Study Tour

A two-week study tour in the textile printing areas of France, Switzerland and Northern Italy introduces textile majors to the expertise of important European printers, screen engravers and studios in the areas of printed textile design, style, color and printing technology. Visits to the two important French historic textile museums and other related textile plants are also included.

Prerequisite: Approval of the program director


TXD-9943 credits

European Knitting Study Tour

A guided visit to the textile machinery producers and textile industry in Europe (Germany and Switzerland). During the 10 to 14-day stay, students will have the opportunity to see some of the leading knitting machine manufacturers, tour the production plants, attend demonstrations, use design equipment and participate in presentations regarding the projected targets of this industry.

Prerequisites: TXF502, TXE712 and TXE752 or equivalents


TXE-6013 credits

Fiber and Yarn Studies

This course advances the knowledge of fibers and yarns. In the case of cotton and wool, a detailed study of how fibers are produced is made and how the properties and structure of fibers vary in relation to variability in growing conditions is explored. For man-made fibers, the length and fineness can be changed during manufacture depending on the type of system on which the yarn is to be produced. Yarn-processing systems are covered in detail along with faults that can result from various causes, in either the fiber or the machines. Quality-control procedures are emphasized at each stage of processing, along with methods for analyzing test results. Typical products are discussed from the point of view of type of fiber used and type of yarn structure.


TXE-6133 credits

Characterization of Fibrous Materials

Topics will include chemical nature and structure; mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties; viscoelastic properties, use of instrumentation with computer-controlled data acquisition; IR, RAMAN, and molecular spectroscopies; SEM; and creep/stress relaxation. The physical and mechanical testing of fibers, yarns and fabrics are studied, along with the static and dynamic-load response of textiles.


TXE-6213 credits

Mechanics of Materials

Definitions of stress and strain, uniform states of stress and strain, transformations, principal axes, stress/stress relations, strain/displacement relations. Equilibrium, boundary conditions, simplifying assumption, and yield criteria are presented.


TXE-6223 credits

Mechanics of Textiles

Hierarchical mechanical-dependency relationships in textiles are discussed. Included are the role of fiber and yarn twist, yarn crimp, finishes, and coatings to mechanical response of textiles. Dynamic and static response to various types of loading are investigated. Tearing, abrasion, and wear properties as a function of textile form are presented.


TXE-6243 credits

Advanced Textile Composites

The objectives of this course will be to expose the student to the textile materials and processes used in composite applications and to introduce methods of analyzing and predicting the behavior of the resultant products. Fiber architecture of textiles used for composites is reviewed along with manufacturing processes. Tools for predicting elastic properties will be introduced along with the relationship of elastic properties and geometric considerations.


TXE-6253 credits

Biomaterials Technology

General introduction to the uses of artificial materials in the human body for the purposes of healing, correcting deformities and restoring lost function are presented. Topics include biocompatibility, techniques to minimize corrosion, and specific uses of materials in various tissues and organs.


TXE-7133 credits

Coloration and Finishing Studies

Applications studied in detail will include methods of imparting dimensional stability to cotton fabrics through cross-linking; the problems associated with dyeing fiber blends; textile printing using pigments and various dyes. A study will also be made of binders, e.g., latex use in pigment printing and dyeing. Other methods of textile coloration, e.g., solution dyeing, garment dyeing and transfer printing will be considered. Instrumental color measurement will also be covered.


TXE-7213 credits

Analytical Methods

Statistical process-control theories and methods are discussed, and applications toward optimizing both process and product quality in modern textile operations is considered. The objective of these studies is to develop a process/product control system for the progressive textile plant of today. Another major segment of this course will be the review and employment of various methods of analysis of experimental data. Various techniques, and their advantages and disadvantages, will be considered and studied using textile applications.


TXE-7513 credits

Advanced Woven Structures - Product Development

Independent pursuit of goals in the development of woven fabrics is emphasized. The student will complete three projects, with product-development skills enhancement as a primary goal. Each project will require a search of current literature, the use of CAD, selection of equipment, production of a prototype fabric and submission of a technical report. Two of the projects will be selected by the course advisor and the third will be student-selected.


TXE-7523 credits

Advanced Knitted Structures - Product Development

This course is an in-depth study of weft- and warp-knitting technologies, fabric constructions, and apparel, home furnishing and industrial products/applications/markets. Weft-knit fabric technologies studied include single flat and tubular, double knit, fully fashioned, electronic, etc. Warp-knit fabric technologies studied include tricot and raschel, weft inserted, double needle bar, multiaxial, etc. Students are exposed to a variety of weft- and warp-knitting machines, stitch constructions and mechanical and electronic design/pattern mechanisms. Knit fabric geometry is analyzed on the machine, off the machine and after finishing. The relationship and interactions between the knitting yarn and knitting elements are well established. Knitting productivity and quality factors are emphasized.


TXE-7533 credits

Advanced Nonwoven Structures - Product Development

Nonwovens have a vast range of physical properties and end-use applications with an exceptionally high performance-to-price ratio. Such remarkable characteristics are possible due to the range of fiber type, bonding methods, and finishing methods possible at an exceptionally low cost. This course is intended to give a broad range of knowledge in nonwoven manufacturing methods cost and end-use applications and consumption. This will be accomplished by lecture, laboratory experiments, literature searches, research, cost analysis, statistical comparisons and modeling.


TXE-7543 credits

Industrial and Specialty Fabrics - Product Development

Industrial fabrics are used in a variety of applications other than consumer apparel and home furnishing products. For example, industrial fabrics are used in automotive trim, architectural fabric structure, awnings/outdoor furniture, aerostats, camping products, commercial/institutional interior trim and furnishings, composites, conveyor belts, filtration, geotextile and geomembrane applications, hazardous occupational products, marine products, military products, passive solar systems, sails, tarpaulins, tents, tires and window energy systems. This course is concerned with the study of major industrial-fabric applications and constructions. The performance requirements for each major industrial application will be related to the selection of specific fabric constructions. Trends in industrial fibers, yarn structures, fabric constructions, fabric finishing/coating/laminating and in fabrication of industrial products are reviewed for each major application. Each major application/market will be covered, wherein specific requirements and qualified fabric construction will be reviewed. The historical development of each application will be emphasized to demonstrate the impact of new materials/material forms/processing techniques on the dynamic nature of the industrial fabric business.


TXE-7553 credits

Advanced Yarn Studies

This course allows for an independent pursuit of advanced knowledge through a literature search in a selected area of research. Further, the course is structured toward an advanced study of the newer methods of yarn manufacture and the latest developments in processing, computerized control and testing methods. Relationships between yarn properties and product properties are investigated.


TXE-7593 credits

Product Evaluation

The processes for the evaluation of fabrics and products are examined. The use of product assessment as a tool for process and product improvement is emphasized. The complexity of the fiber, yarn, fabric and product-forming systems is such that it requires careful evaluation at each stage of the manufacturing process. A comprehensive understanding of the interrelationships of the fabric and product forming stages as related to their evaluation is developed. Established and innovative methods of evaluation are explored.


TXE-7623 credits

Textile and Apparel Operations Management

This course is intended to cover the usual operations management topics, but with direct emphasis on textile and apparel operations. It deals with such topics as global competitiveness, product layout, strategies of life-cycle management, capacity planning and forecasting, quality management, materials management, human resource management, facilities management, production planning, characteristics of textile equipment and managing technological change.


TXE-7833 credits

Advanced Chemistry of Fibrous Materials

The course is designed to introduce modern methods of instrumental analysis and related technologies to fibrous materials. This course is concerned with the study of spectroscopic methods such as: UV-Spectroscopy, FTIR, NMR, EPR, GC, HPLC, microscopy, DSC and some microbiological methods, etc., applied to material science and technology. In addition, this course will introduce students to related fields of fibrous materials and polymers such as gels and sprays, and the technology of production of delivery systems for drugs and medications. Introduction to adhesion processes and superabsorbents (e.g., diapers, incontinence products and biotextiles) will also be covered. Lectures are complemented with laboratory work and seminars.


TXE-7903 credits

Quality Management

Quality has emerged as a formal management function. No longer restricted to manufacturing and operations areas, it now includes the design, purchasing and marketing processes. Through lecture, discussion and experiential activities, this course examines quality theory and practice — how a more sophisticated understanding of quality can lead to a strategic approach to utility management which is necessary to compete in today’s world marketplace. Factors required for creating and maintaining a corporation’s strategic and competitive edge are thoroughly analyzed.


TXE-7913 credits

Internship

Internships provide students with an opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge they have gained in the classroom. Under faculty supervision, students work in salaried positions related to their career goals. While on their assignments, students develop meaningful learning objectives, attend an internship seminar, complete challenging assignments and write bi-weekly reports analyzing articles in academic journals and practitioner publications.
Prerequisites: Minimum of 18 graduate credits (excluding foundation courses); available to full-time students only and subject to availability and eligibility; permission required, see program director or Office of Career Services for details. 


TXE-7971-3 credits

Selected Topics


TXE-7983 credits

Independent Study

Students may select an independent project or research topic. Approval required, see appropriate form online on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


TXE-9419 credits

Research Thesis

In consultation with the thesis advisor, the student will select an area for concentrated study. The elements of the study will include, but not be limited to, literature searches, experimental design, research, thesis preparation (using the most current Philadelphia University Guide For The Preparation Of Doctoral Dissertation And Master’s Theses document) and oral thesis presentation. This project is the culmination of a rigorous preparation in one or more areas of specialization and leads to the establishment of expertise in a chosen field. (20 hours minimum per week)


TXF-5013 credits

Foundation Fiber and Yarn Studies

This course introduces the basic knowledge of fiber and yarn technology. Included are the proper use of fiber/yarn terms and definitions, the construction parameters of the various fiber and yarn types and detailed analysis of performance properties for each. This information is then used in the proper selection of fibers and yarns for various fabrics and ultimately for various end-use textile products in apparel, household and industrial applications. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit toward the graduate degree.


TXF-5033 credits

History of Textiles and Costumes

A multi-faceted survey of textiles and costumes from ancient cultures to the present, technical- and visual-design aspects of the textile arts, the influence of trade on design trends, styles in period costume and the sociological implications of dress are all incorporated. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit towards the graduate degree.


TXF-5063 credits

Design Foundations II

Color is introduced in this foundation design course with an emphasis placed on its practical application in the design process. Projects done by students, using a variety of media, will explore the interaction of color in design with both formal, biophysical and psychological implications and goals. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit towards the graduate degree.


TXF-5073 credits

Design Foundations III

In-depth studies emphasizing the use of color and varied media in both 2D and 3D forms are undertaken in this foundation course. The interrelationship of the elements and principles of design are addressed through solving a variety of visual problems. Processes of abstraction are explored in projects using a wide variety of media. Students will be expected to develop their abilities for critical analysis of their own work, as well as design processes and products in general. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit towards the graduate degree.


TXF-5103 credits

Introduction to Digital Imaging

This course focuses on increasing the student’s individual level of computer literacy through the exploration of the basic structure of the operating system, general Internet skills and the fundamentals of 2D image making and web-design programs. Course projects provide hands-on experience with Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and web design software. This is a foundation course that does not count for credit towards the graduate degree.


TXF-5114 credits

Knit Technology I

The understanding of both weft- and warp-knit fabrics through an investigation of knit construction, machinery, principles and knit fabric analysis. Lectures are complemented with a series of lab exercises on hand-flat equipment and fabric-analysis projects designed to fully acquaint the student with the principles of knit-fabric design and production.


TXF-5123 credits

Knit Design Studio I

Students will learn through individual development how to create a range of texture and color effects within knit design. Independent needle selection and the use of the presser foot will be explored within design areas involving Jacquard, held-stitch and tuck-stitch structures. Design ideas will be developed through to swatch/sketch proposals suitable for sweater production.


TXF-5133 credits

Knit Design Studio II

A knit design studio elective for Textile or Fashion majors specializing in the knit-design area. Original design ideas will be developed through swatch/sketch presentations. Garment ideas will be developed through technical sketches and specifications into completed sweaters.


TXF-5143 credits

Print Design Studio I

Techniques, materials, tools and basic information needed for the design on paper of printed fabrics for the apparel and home furnishing fields are studied. Hands on approaches with gouache and watercolor are used to prepare colorway and repeats. Students prepare a portfolio and learn to keep a sketchbook. A brief introduction to printing methods is included.


TXF-5153 credits

Print Design II

This course focuses on creative use of CAD in surface patterning, which integrates with hands-on design applications that students acquired in PRINT-303 Print Design I. Digital workflow, which includes scanning croquis, designing pattern on CAD, digital color matching and color ways will be introduced. At the same time, strong emphasis is placed on making croquis, which develop from drawings and paintings in the sketchbook. Students will create printed textile designs and patterns for Jacquard designs on paper with digital printers for apparel and home furnishing fields. Throughout the semester, sketchbook study will also be required to document the working process, as well as drawings and paintings.


TXF-5164 credits

Dyeing & Finishing

This course presents an overview of the wet processing of fibers, yarns and fabrics. Included are the preparation, dyeing and finishing of textiles. Some emphasis is placed on the chemistry and technology involved in these operations. Dyes are studied by their method of application and the primary substrates to which they are applied. Chemical, thermal and mechanical processes are discussed for both preparation and finishing of fabrics.


TXF-5174 credits

Weave Technology I

The structures and analysis of woven fabrics will be studied utilizing CAD, pick outs and laboratory assignments on industrial equipment. Weave structures will include plain, twills and satins (with their derivatives), color effects, textural effects (cords, piques, etc.) and pile weaves. Fabric will be mathematically analyzed for weight, yarn size, fabric count and yarn crimp to specify fabric structure. Necessary loom controls (draw, chains and reed plans) will be used to relate lectures and laboratory work on dobby looms.


TXF-5183 credits

Weave Design Studio I

This course focuses on the effects and interactions that yarn, color, texture and structure play in woven design. Working with multi-harness floor looms and dobby looms, students create warps and chains, and weave prototype cloth for various end uses.


TXF-5193 credits

Weave Design Studio II

The study of elements of woven design is brought to the problems of multi-layered cloth, compound weaves, block designs and other advanced structures. Students use several CAD programs in conjunction with AVL compu-dobbies to increase their design capabilities. Multi-harness floor looms and dobby looms are also used to develop cloth from concept to actuality.