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Undergraduate Course Descriptions

ACCT Accounting ADFND Architecture Design Foundation
AENGR Architectural Engineering AHIST History of Architecture & Interiors
ANIM Animation ARAB Arabic
ARCH Architecture ARCHDSN Architecture Design
ARCST Architectural Studies AREAST Area Studies
ARTH Art History ARTS Arts and Culture
BCHEM Bio Chemistry BEHLT Behavior Health
BIOL Biology BLAW Business Law
BUS Business CAD Computer-Aided Design
CHEM Chemistry CHINE Chinese
CMGT Construction Management CMPR Computing
COLLST College Studies COMM Communications
CSSEM Continuing Studies Seminar DECFRM DEC Frameworks
DECPROC DEC Process DECMTHD DEC Methods
DECSYS DEC Systems DIGD Interactive Design & Media
DIY Discover It Yourself DRAW Drawing
DSGN Design DSGNFND Design Foundations
ECBIO Environmental Science ECON Economics
EMS Emergency Services EMT Emergency Medical Technician
ENGR Engineering FASHDES Fashion Design
FASHDRW Fashion Drawing FASHMGT Fashion Management
FIM Fashion Industry Management FINC Finance
FREN French GER German
GLOB Global Portfolio GRAPH Graphic Design Communication
HIST Historical Understanding HLTSV Health Services
HSCI Health Sciences HONOR Honors Program
HRM Human Resources HUMN Humanities
IENGR Industrial and Systems Engineering INDD Industrial Design
INTD Interior Design INTRN Internship
IT Information Technology ITAL Italian
JAPN Japanese JSINT Junior Seminar: Integrative Professional Seminar
JSLA Junior Seminar: Liberal Arts Seminar KNIT Knitting
LANG Language LARCH Landscape Architecture
LAW Law LAWEN Law Enforcement
LHS Leadership & Homeland Security LIT Literature
MATH Mathematics MBB MBA Pilot Bridge Program
MENGR Mechanical Engineering MGMT Management
MIS Information Systems MKTG Marketing
MMW Midwifery (GR) MSID Industrial Design (GR)
OCC Occupational Therapy (GR) OTA Occupational Therapy Assistant (CPS)
PAS Health Sciences/Physician Assistant Studies PE Physical Education
PHOTO Photography PHYS Physics
PRINT Print Design PSYCH Psychology
PUBH Public Health READ Reading
SCI Science SERVE Civic Engagement
SOC Social Sciences SPAN Spanish
STAT Statistics STUAB Study Abroad
SUST Sustainability TENGR Textile Engineering
TEXT Textile TEXTCHM Textile Chemistry
VSDES Visual Studies: Design VSDRW Visual Studies: Drawing
WEAV Weaving WRTG Writing


ACCT-101 (Formerly B403) 3-0-3

Financial Accounting

Designed to introduce all business students to the field of accounting, the course covers the fundamental principles of accounting, highlighting balance sheet and income statement presentation. Primary emphasis on accounting as a source of financial information, with procedural details kept to a minimum.


ACCT-102 (Formerly B423) 3-0-3

Managerial Accounting

Objective analysis and interpretation of accounting information. Use of accounting information as a basis for planning, control and managerial decisions.

Prerequisite: ACCT-101 (required for all business students)


ACCT-203 (Formerly B441) 3-0-3

Intermediate Accounting I

An in-depth study of basic accounting principles and theory followed by a detailed analysis of cash, receivables and investments (including the related revenue and expense transactions). Text supplemented with the current rulings of the AICPA.

Prerequisite: ACCT-101


ACCT-204 (Formerly B442) 3-0-3

Intermediate Accounting II

Continues the analysis of a company’s balance sheet with a study of inventories, fixed assets and liabilities. Text supplemented by current rulings of the AICPA.

Prerequisite: ACCT-203


ACCT-303 (Formerly B443) 3-0-3

Accounting Theory and Practice

This course will enable students to study topics such as corporate entities, cash flow statements, pensions and leases; along with other material not covered in previous accounting courses.

Prerequisite: ACCT-204


ACCT-309 (Formerly B463) 3-0-3

Federal Taxes I

This course examines the federal tax laws as related to individual income taxation. The textbook is supplemented by using the actual 1040 tax forms and the related supporting schedules. The course is open to all students.

Prerequisite: ACCT-101


ACCT-316 (Formerly B461) 3-0-3

Cost Accounting I

This course includes study of job order, process and standard cost systems; cost-volume-profit analysis; absorption versus direct costing; inventory-control systems, including EOQ and JIT systems concepts; relevant costing in decision making; time value of money concepts; and capital-budgeting theory and application.

Prerequisite: ACCT-203


ACCT-325 (Formerly B466) 3-0-3

Business Taxes-State and Federal

An in-depth coverage of business taxes. Emphasis is placed on partnership, corporation and sub-corporations. Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware tax laws will be examined.

Prerequisite: ACCT-309


ACCT-381 (Formerly B499) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Accounting

Intensive independent study of a chosen subject. The student is expected to read a substantial number of major works in the field and to prepare a critical documented paper. See also the statement on Independent Study under “University Academic Policies and Procedures: Common Academic Policies for All Students.”

Prerequisites: permission required, see appropriate form online on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


ACCT-409 (Formerly B464) 3-0-3

Auditing

Principles, standards and procedures of auditing. Emphasis upon the public accounting profession, its current pronouncements, practices and problems.

Prerequisite: ACCT-204


ACCT-412 (Formerly B465) 3-0-3

Advanced Accounting

This course includes study of business combinations and consolidated financial-statement preparation, foreign subsidiary operations, foreign transactions and government and not-for-profit industry accounting. The text is supplemented with current rulings of the AICPA.

Prerequisite: ACCT-303


ADFND-101 (Formerly A111) 0-8-4

Design 1: Interdisciplinary Foundation Studies

This basic foundation course is required in the Architecture, Interior Design and Landscape Architecture curricula. It is an introduction to fundamental design principles and vocabulary, process methodologies and problem-solving strategies. Lectures and demonstrations will stress abstraction as a primary building block for future design studios.


ADFND-103 1-5-3

Drawing I for Architecture and Design

Basic drawing experience to develop the understanding of form as applied to two- and three-dimensional space. The student works from nature, still life and the human figure in a variety of media; exploring qualities of line, texture, light and space representation. Students begin to explore subjects and develop ideas with application to the design majors.


ADFND-104 (Formerly A122)1-5-3

Drawing 2 for Architecture

This is a drawing elective option. Drawing skills will be developed through rapid exploratory sketches and through complex three-dimensional studies that explore volumes/voids and light/shade with special references to architectural details and furniture. Investigation of space/form relationships through one- and two-point perspectives and through various drawing materials will be introduced.

Prerequisite: DRAW-101


ADFND-110 (Formerly A124)1-5-3

Painting from Perception

Building on the foundation of the introductory drawing course, this elective course allows students to work from perception as they learn painting skills using acrylic and other water-based media. The course explores issues of composition with color and develops the student’s sensibility toward the use of color. Subject matter includes still life, portraiture, figure, interiors and landscape.

Prerequisites: DRAW-101, and ADFND-101 or DSGNFND-103


ADFND-112 (Formerly A125) 1-4-3

Technics of Communication

The designed object is tangible, but it is always first an image. The image, the product of visualization, is most fundamentally communicated through the techniques of two-dimensional modeling we call drawing. Today’s designer is privileged to own a vast range of technologies, ancient and modern, to devise comprehensive strategies for visualizing and communicating ideas. By integrating techniques the student will learn the appropriate tool to employ at any given point in the design process to effectively communicate to self and to others.

Prerequisites: DRAW-101, grade of “C” or better in ADFND-101


AENGR-2000-8-4

Architectural Engineering Design

This foundation course is required for Architectural Engineering. It is an introduction to design principles, vocabulary and process methodologies leading to the understanding of architectural and research process. Use of prevalent and emerging visualization tools for building information modeling (BIM) including REVIT will be covered.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, ENGR-101, ENGR-102


AENGR-301 3-0-3

Structural Analysis I

Structural Analysis I provides the basis and serves as a foundation for subsequent advanced Structural Analysis courses. Assumptions, principles of equilibrium in determining structures reactions, bending moments and shear diagrams will be discussed. Additionally, analysis of plane and space trusses, influence lines, computer analysis of determinate trusses, optimization in structural systems, approximate methods of analysis for indeterminate structures, determination of displacements by virtual work, and Castiglione’s Theorem and moment area theorems will be taught.

Prerequisites: ENGR 215


AENGR-303 3-0-3

Structural Design with Compression Elements

The main objective of this course is to provide students with a rational basis of the design of reinforced concrete members and structures through advanced understanding of material and structural behavior. The subject will be approached by looking into the behavior of reinforced concrete at different levels – material level, element level and structural and systems level.

Prerequisite: AENGR-301


AENGR-305 3-0-3

Structural Design with Tensile Elements

The main objective of this course is to provide students with a rational basis of the design of tensile members, elements and structures through advanced understanding of material and structural behavior. The subject will be approached by looking into the behavior of steel, timber and fabrics at different levels – material level, element level and structural and systems level.

Prerequisite: AENGR-301


AENGR-307 3-0-3

Soil Mechanics

This course presents technical aspects of soil properties, identification and classification of earth materials, stress strain behavior of soils and movement of water through soils. The student will also be introduced to geotechnical design.

Prerequisite: ENGR 301


AENGR-400 3-0-3

Mechanical and Electrical Systems for Buildings

This course will introduce basic principles, types and applications of mechanical and electrical systems for buildings. Topics include air conditioning, heating, fire protection, electrical power and electrical lighting. Students will learn various design methods that impact building environment and indoor air quality.

Prerequisite: ENGR 322


AHIST-205 (Formerly A331) 3-0-3

History 1: The Built Environment, Ancient to Medieval

By tracing significant historical themes, this course spotlights canonic examples of Western and non-Western architecture, interiors and landscape design from Ancient times to the Medieval period. Major monuments of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas are examined as solutions to technical problems, utilizing available materials, and as spatial and structural embodiments of cultural belief systems. Students acquire a working vocabulary for both analyzing and evaluating the built environment and material culture.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


AHIST-206 (Formerly A332) 3-0-3

History 2: Renaissance/Baroque Architecture and Interiors (1300-1750)

Focusing upon global changes relative to urbanism, patterns of patronage and the intersection of church and state, this course highlights significant examples of Western and non-Western architecture and interiors produced from the 14th through the mid-18th centuries. Each case study is situated within a broad historical context and understood as paradigmatic of a period’s values and aspirations that are given concrete form through available materials, construction methods and technologies. Students acquire a working vocabulary for both analyzing and evaluating architecture, interiors, and material culture.

Prerequisite: AHIST-205


AHIST-305 (Formerly A531) 3-0-3

History 3: Early Modern Architecture and Interiors (1750-1930)

(writing intensive)

This course chronicles the impact of Enlightenment thinking and of the shifting definitions of modernity upon architecture and interior design by tracing the transition from Historicism to the International Style. New notions of progress and evolution; industrialization and urbanization; and debates concerning the role of the machine and the meaning of ornament are set against major technological advances. Students examine key theoretical texts and accomplish archival research on a historic structure in the Philadelphia area.

Prerequisite: AHIST-206


AHIST-306 (Formerly A532) 3-0-3

History 4: Modern/Contemporary Architecture and Interiors (1930-present)

(writing intensive)

This course analyzes major movements and theoretical constructs that have dominated architecture and interior design from the post-World War II period until the present. Discussion focuses upon societal and environmental aspects — politics, economics, science and technology, psychology, etc. — that shape the greater context for architecture, interiors and the allied arts. Students examine key theoretical texts to evaluate current thinking relative to issues such as sustainability, critical regionalism, phenomenology and the role of the digital in contemporary practice.

Prerequisite: AHIST-305


ANIM-2011-5-3

Introduction to Animation

This course will introduce students to the practice of animation and the various techniques employed in its production. Short exercises involving hand-drawn, stop-motion and other non-digital means will serve to expose students to the fundamental concepts involved. Students will then apply these concepts to their digital toolkit in order to create a longer final project.

Prerequisite: VSDES-101 and DRAW-101


ANIM-202 1-5-3

Storytelling and Storyboarding

This course will seek to give students a strong foundation in storytelling. Emphasis will be placed on visual storytelling, as the storyboard is the script for animation. In addition to story structure, students will explore screen composition and editing as means of relating narrative content. The class will consist of several storyboard exercises, culminating in the production of an animatic, a filmed version of the storyboard with a soundtrack.

Prerequisite: ANIM-201


ANIM-301N (Formerly ANIM-301) 0-8-4

Motion Graphics I

This major studio course explores time and motion in the creation of primarily graphic narratives. The techniques of abstraction, motion typography and musical synchronization are studied in the context of increasingly complex projects. A major aspect of the course will be the screening of both abstract films and reels from contemporary motion graphics films.

Prerequisite: ANIM-202


ANIM-303 3-0-3

History of Animated Cinema

(writing intensive)

This class will expose students to the range of animated cinema, from the early days of film to contemporary computer-generated work. Class will consist of screening and discussing a range of short and feature-length films. During the semester, students will be expected to write responses to the films as well as conduct further research into the medium and its history.

Prerequisite: ANIM-202 or permission of the director of the Animation program


ANIM-307 1-5-3

3D Modeling

This course will give students a foundation in the concepts and techniques of 3D modeling and rendering. Specific attention will be paid to modeling environments, objects and characters. Students will explore polygonal, NURBS and subdivision-surface modeling and their respective workflows.

Prerequisite: ANIM-201


ANIM-308N (Formerly ANIM-308) 0-8-4

3D Animation

This course builds upon the concepts learned in 3D modeling to include animation and character setup. Special attention will be given to applying the techniques of traditional character animation to this contemporary medium. Projects will range from short animation exercises to a longer, character-driven piece. In addition, the class will view and discuss current and classic animated film.

Prerequisite: ANIM-307


ANIM-312 1-5-3

Motion Graphics II

This class explores the concepts covered in Motion Graphics I but with the introduction of 3D graphics and video as elements of motion graphics. In addition, the mediums of dance, photography, architecture and painting will be discussed as possible inspirations.

Prerequisites: ANIM-301N, ANIM-307


ANIM-407N (Formerly ANIM-407) 0-8-4

Advanced Topics in 3D Animation

This class will allow students to delve deeper into areas covered in prior 3D classes. Topics include advanced modeling techniques, character setup, special effects, dynamics, lighting and rendering. The creation of a character interacting with its environment will drive the projects in this class.

Prerequisite: ANIM-308N


ANIM-497N (Formerly ANIM-487) 0-12-6

Animation Capstone I

(writing intensive)

This course focuses on preparing the student to create a short film as their Capstone Project. The pre-production phase includes conceptualizing the story, writing the script and creating storyboards. In the process of preparing, students will also learn to schedule, budget and distribute their film. Before the end of the semester, students will have all the necessary materials to begin production on their short film.

Prerequisites: ANIM-312, ANIM-407


ANIM-499N (Formerly ANIM-499) 0-12-6

Animation Capstone II

This course represents the culminating experience for Animation students. Students are required to produce and deliver a short film, realizing the concepts they developed in the previous semester and synthesizing the knowledge and skills from the preceding courses. In addition, students will be required to produce a finished portfolio appropriate to the industry in which they will be pursuing further work.

Prerequisite: ANIM-497N


ARAB-1013-0-3

Arabic I

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


ARAB-2013-0-3

Arabic II

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


ARCH-102 (Formerly A112)

Design 2: Architecture Foundation Studies

This basic foundation course is required in the Architecture and Historic Preservation and Visual Studies curricula. It is a synthesis of fundamental design principles and an introduction to research as a tool for understanding programming and design. Lectures and demonstrations will utilize the case-study methodology to investigate various design strategies and to chart the historical course of modernism.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in ADFND-101


ARCH-213 0-8-4

Design 3: Architecture Foundations Studies

This foundation studio concentrates on general issues concerning “dwelling” and specific issues addressing housing and residential design are explored. Emphasis is placed on designing in the urban context. This course uses research and analysis of human patterns of occupancy and settlement as a means of exploration. Techniques of representation are developed and refined.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in ARCH-102


ARCH-214 0-8-4

Design 4: Architecture Foundations Studies

This foundation course focuses on building the landscape using the elements, principles and theories of

architectural and landscape design. Concurrently, specific theoretical issues related to design, organization and the interrelationship of interior and exterior space are explored. A particular emphasis

is placed on an experiential and intuitive design process. The importance of the building parti as a

response to naturally occurring context is emphasized. Techniques of representation are developed and refined.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in ADFND-201


ARCH-204 3-0-3

Great Buildings: Structure, Style and Context

This course surveys selected, key monuments of architectural history from ancient through modern times that are paradigmatic of building art and science during a particular period. The buildings spotlighted represent dominant “types” from pyramids to skyscrapers that are not only laboratories for innovative design and cutting-edge technologies, but also are expressive of the values and aspirations of the society at large. Developments in the areas of materiality and structural systems will be integrated with changing social, economic, political, stylistic and environmental demands that are normative of a particular time and place. Students majoring in Architecture, Historic Preservation and Visual Studies, Landscape Architecture or Interior Design are not permitted to take this course.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


ARCH-212 (Formerly ARCH-211, A342) 2-2-3

Technology 2: Passive Systems and Building Enclosure

This lecture/lab course examines technological issues relevant to passive environmental systems and sustainable technologies. Central to the course is a student’s understanding of the temporal nature of program and site and their impact upon the design of natural lighting, passive heating and cooling systems and issues of enclosure, materiality and skin, as well as their relation to our natural and built environments.

Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-210


ARCH-303 (Formerly ARCH-309, A541) 2-2-3

Structures 1

This course merges structural design (form) and analysis as a simultaneous act and introduces the role of structural engineering in the architectural process. Students develop familiarity with the fundamentals of statics, gain a sense of how structures resist forces and learn to visualize the load path and the direction of forces. Material is learned while designing actual structures and details. Structural design and analysis is taught using both numerical and graphical analyses for the preliminary shapes of cable structures, arches, and trusses.

Prerequisites: MATH-103 or MATH-111, PHYS-101


ARCH-304 (Formerly ARCH-310, A542) 2-2-3

Structures 2

Reinforcing concepts learned in Structures 1, this course presents the effect of cross-sectional properties on stresses in beams as well as the concept of bending as it is applied to beams, columns, slabs and walls in wood, steel and reinforced concrete. Also covered are the resistance of buildings and their components to lateral loads (wind and earthquake) and the introduction to structural grids and patterns for structural systems in wood, steel and concrete as they relate to gravity and lateral loads.

Prerequisite: ARCH-303


ARCH-311 0-12-6

Design 5 for Architecture

This topical studio explores the integration between individual buildings and urban design. The course focuses on creating community within the city. Students investigate socio-cultural and environmental aspects of the city as they relate to architecture. The studio includes discussion of architectural history, theory and principles as the basis for the making of architecture and urban form.

Prerequisites: 5-year B.Arch major, ARCH-212, grade of “C” or better in ARCH-202


ARCH-312 0-12-6

Design 6 for Architecture

This tectonics studio focuses on the theories surrounding the materials and processes of making architecture. Students investigate the inherent properties of building materials to understand their roles in informing and directing the design process. They explore methods of structure, enclosure, and assembly to analyze their effect on built form.

Prerequisites: 5-year B. Arch major, ARCH-212, grade of “C” or better in ARCH-202


ARCH-313 (Formerly ARCH-403, A741) 2-2-3

Technology 3: Dynamic Environmental Systems

This lecture/lab course presents basic theory and application parameters associated with the dynamic building systems within the architectural environment. These include HVAC, power and data, lighting, acoustics, security, plumbing, vertical transportation and life and fire safety. Emphasis is placed on the relationships of these systems within the building structure and envelope, as well as the integration of design processes, the implementation of sustainable design principles, and the health, safety and welfare of users.

Prerequisite: ARCH-212


ARCH-314 (Formerly ARCH-404, A742) 2-2-3

Technology 4: Advanced Building Analysis

This lecture/lab is the capstone course to the Structures and Technology course sequences. This course presents advanced theory, design and application parameters associated with structures, environmental systems and enclosure within the architectural environment. These parameters are examined through the context of building form typology. Emphasis is placed on the relationships of structures, environmental systems and building enclosure within each building type, and the use of these design elements in the conceptualization and realization of architecture.

Prerequisite: ARCH-313


ARCH-320 3-0-3

Ecology and Making

The objective of this seminar is to broaden the base of understanding relative to the current discussion of sustainability and reveal some of the greater complexities of the topic. The course will include relevant design work, work outside of the realm of convention, and non-designers that have contributed greatly to the field. The semester’s readings will explore the topic through different filters: technological, historical, philosophical, aesthetic, scientific, social, economic, political and cultural.

Prerequisites: AHIST-306 or LARCH-411 or INDD304


ARCH-321 (Formerly A618) 3-0-3

Itineraries of European Contemporary Architecture

During the period of the 1960s through the 1970s, architecture was both very radical and very expensive with only a few examples on the European landscape. Since the beginning of the 1990s, this has changed and Europe is showing strong signs of renewed vitality with an increasing number of outstanding buildings and bridges. This course will explore the different cultural, social, political and economic reasons associated with these changes in a variety of locations throughout Europe.

Co-requisite: STUAB-300


ARCH-324 (Formerly A624) 1-4-3

Visualization: Experimental Modeling

This advanced digital elective course focuses on the direct correlation between digital techniques and the design process. Complex three-dimensional modeling, rendering, animation, design visualization and presentation are emphasized in the course methodology. Using a variety of software, students complete a series of exercises of increasing difficulty leading to a final project that demonstrates the culmination of the skills developed throughout the semester.

Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-208


ARCH-326 (Formerly A623) 1-4-3

Visualization 2: Advanced Modeling

This advanced, computer-aided design course focuses on complex three-dimensional modeling, photo-realistic rendering and virtual reality; with an emphasis on using 3-D Studio Advanced modeling and rendering software. Interactive media and digital imaging are introduced in order to increase the effectiveness of student presentations. Students complete a series of specifically designed exercises of increasing difficulty leading to a final project of the student’s choosing from a concurrent or earlier design studio.

Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-208


ARCH-401 0-12-6

Design 7 for Architecture: Studio Options

This studio permits students to customize their professional education by offering a series of options, including study abroad architectural studio, design-build studio, interdisciplinary studio, design studio within another discipline or another option approved by the program director.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in both ARCH-311 and ARCH-312


ARCH-412 0-12-6

Design 8 for Architecture

This comprehensive course demands that students work in teams integrating constructional structural and environmental systems in the design and documentation of a large and complex building. Students research building type and systems precedents and their resulting impact on built form, analyze material properties, specify component building systems and apply codes and standards to fulfill technical, programmatic and aesthetic needs.

Prerequisites: ARCH-314; grade of "C" or better in both ARCH-311 and ARCH-312 Co-requisite: ARCH-416


ARCH-413 (Formerly A841) 2-2-3

Experimental Structures

This elective lab/seminar course is an exploration into the architectural potential of form-active structures (including thin-shell, tensile-membrane and fabric structures), and new and alternative materials and methods of construction. Unlike conventional structures that rely on their internal rigidity, form-active structures rely purely on their geometric shape to carry loads, thus providing a base for experimenting with form to create innovative solutions for structural-design problems.

Prerequisite: ARCH-304 or AENGR-305


ARCH-414 (Formerly A844) 2-2-3

Experimental Materials

This elective lab/seminar course is a hands-on exploration into the mechanical properties and aesthetic potential of materials in the built environment. The course encourages experimentation with both new materials and non-traditional use of existing materials toward the full-scale production of architectural objects and building components. Implications of craft and technology underscore research and production. Students complete several smaller individual projects and a larger group project of longer duration.

Prerequisite: ARCH-303 or AENGR-301


ARCH-415 (Formerly A628) 1-4-3

Visualization: Multimedia

This interdisciplinary course focuses on Interactive CD-ROM design, webpage design and digital-video production. Students begin by reviewing basic two-dimensional, design-communication concepts as a prelude to more complex projects involving various digital media. The course is primarily taught on the Macintosh platform and features software such as Adobe Premier, Macromedia Flash and Macromedia Director. Students create their own individualized final project as approved by the instructor.

Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-208 or GRAPH-202


ARCH-416 (Formerly ARCH-511, A845) 1-4-3

Technology 5: Documentation and Detailing

This course focuses on the important role of structural, environmental, and constructional

systems in the design process through the creation of technically precise computer generated drawings and models. Students systematically analyze precedence through case studies and develop their own design into a set of technical documents and details that enhance the project concept. The utilize CAD and BIM computer software to convey their technical design intentions.

Prerequisites: ARCH-314; ARCH-326 Co-requisite: ARCH-412


ARCH-417 2-2-3

Urban Strategies

This lecture/seminar course introduces the history and theory that informs contemporary issues in urban design. It examines the evolving structure of the modern city and the ways in which theoretical ideas and design strategies impact the urban landscape. The importance of environmental and social responsibility and the role of the architect in the urban design process are stressed, while at the same time considering form and spatial qualities of buildings in the urban environment.

Prerequisites: AHIST-306, History 4, ARCH-311Design 5, ARCH-312 Design 6


ARCH-418 (Formerly A842) 3-0-3

Housing and Construction Technology

This elective seminar course explores interrelated issues of housing, land and construction. Discussions and research center around how historical and cultural concepts of the home- and land-use have brought housing to its present condition, and how current concerns about land use and construction technologies might effect a change.

Prerequisite: ARCH-212 or LARCH-207


ARCH-423 0-8-3

Architecture Fellowship

This course is designed to allow students to take the first step towards learning to be a teacher. During the semester students will be linked one-to-one with a section of a foundation design studio. Participation in desk critiques and the review process, as Studio Assistants rather than as the student, allows upper level students the opportunity to share their knowledge with foundation students. In return by revisiting the fundamentals as a Studio assistant, students will be able to reevaluate the work they are doing in their own coursework and to develop further their critical, analytical, speaking and communication skills.


ARCH-426 (Formerly A636) 1-4-3

Design/Build

Through a combination of lecture and lab, students apply knowledge of building technologies and structural systems to the design and construction of a project at appropriate scale. Working under the supervision of faculty, students research, plan and build their solution to a problem of topical interest.

Prerequisite: ARCH-212 or LARCH-207


ARCH-430 (Formerly A637) 1-4-3

Architecture in Education

Each student is teamed with a practicing architect and a classroom teacher to develop and carry out an eight-week program for a class of school children (elementary through high school). The emphasis is on hands-on activities and direct experiences (neighborhood walks, etc.) that introduce the children to the basic principles of architecture and the built environment. The program is in collaboration with the Foundation for Architecture, the Philadelphia Public School District and local architecture firms.

Prerequisites: ARCH-202 or LARCH-202; WRTG-215; and the ability to travel to sites away from campus


ARCH-431 (Formerly A762) 0-2-1

Portfolio Presentation

This course focuses on the evaluation, documentation, layout and formal presentation of the student’s work. Writing and verbal skills are emphasized as an important aspect of presenting a portfolio. Various graphic techniques are introduced.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in both ARCH-311 and ARCH-312 or LARCH-302; or grade of “C” or better in INTD-401


ARCH-503 (Formerly ARCH-505, ARCH-506) 3-0-3

Professional Management

This course focuses on the nature of the architect’s practice and on office proprietorship typologies, through detailed studies of legal, financial, marketing and management issues. Using individual projects, it examines the project process – from development through construction, including administrative procedures, economic systems, codes, standards and regulations – as well as various professional disciplines’ responsibilities and requirements for professional registration. Contractual and ethical obligations of the architect, particularly in response to client needs and safety, as well as codes, standards and regulations are covered.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in both ARCH-311 and ARCH-312 or LARCH-302


ARCH-507 0-12-6

Design 9 for Architecture

This studio combines seminar and workshop elements in a non-linear manner to allow students to develop the architectural agenda explored in their position papers done for the required theory seminar. Students engage in a rigorous process uniting research, analysis, and design. Each studio section is topical according to the curricular streams identified in the students’ work.

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in ARCH-507


ARCH-508 0-12-6

Design 10 for Architecture

This studio combines seminar and workshop elements in a non-linear manner to allow students to develop the architectural agenda explored in their position papers done for the required theory seminar. Students engage in a rigorous process uniting research, analysis, and design. Each studio section is topical according to the curricular streams identified in the students’ work.                                                                                                         

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in ARCH-507


ARCHDSN-208 (Formerly A321)1-4-3

Visualization 1: Digital Modeling

The primary intent of this course is to establish the computer as an effective tool in the design and presentation process. The course will focus on two primary areas in this regard: visualizing design concepts in three dimensions and communicating those concepts in a manner consistent with studio level work. Each project will explore various methods of describing two and three dimensional objects and spaces.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in ARCH-102 or grade “C” or better in INTD-102


ARCHDSN-210 (Formerly A341) 2-2-3

Technology 1: Materials and Methods

This course focuses on the presentation of the technical factors of construction that affect a building’s structure. Students are introduced to and compare the nature and structural characteristics of the major construction systems of wood, masonry, steel and concrete. Structural principles, as well as building and zoning codes, are introduced and their influence on form and choice of materials is emphasized.


ARCHDSN-212 (Formerly INTD-210 and A351) 1-4-3

Color: Theory and Practice

This elective studio explores the phenomena and meaning of color, based on appropriate theories of the physical aspects of color using pigment, light and space. Exercises examine what color is, why it is and how we see it. Additional foci include control of color interactions and distinguishing color differences. This course will provide the basis for color choices in a logical and sequential manner and will bridge the gap between theory and use.


ARCHDSN-214 (Formerly A602) 2-2-3

Model Building

This elective course focuses on the visualization of ideas in three dimensions. Fundamentals of model building are studied from a perspective that stresses the relationship between the design process and the application of current model-building techniques. Assignments emphasize the development of skills necessary to construct models and the ability to budget for time and materials. Mock-ups, quick sketch models and final presentation models are stressed.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in ADFND-101


ARCHDSN-381 (Formerly A999) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Architecture, Interior Design and Landscape Architecture

For further details, see general description of Independent Study in ““University Academic Policies and Procedures: Common Academic Policies for All Students”” section.

Permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


ARCST-221 3-0-3

Introduction to Historic Preservation

This course provides an introduction to the field of Historic Preservation. The goals include: development of discipline-specific terminology; overview of preservation law, policies, and advocacy; analysis of current issues relative to sustainability, preservation and adaptive reuse. Field trips to sites and guest speakers complement lecture/discussion format.

Prerequisites: ARCH-102 or INTD-102 or LARCH-102


ARCST-266 2-2-3

Preservation Technology I: Traditional Systems and Materials

Preservation Technology 1 provides a comprehensive overview of traditional structural systems and exterior envelope materials, characteristic of buildings dating from the 17th to the late 19th centuries, including wood, masonry, mortars, terra cotta, stucco and metals. The course will examine the ongoing processes of material deterioration and introduce available methods for treating observed problems through research and hands-on material examination, both in the classroom and in the field.

Prerequisites: ARCH-102 or INTD-102 or AENGR-200 or CMGT-102


ARCST 268 2-2-3

Preservation Technology II: Modern Structures and Materials

This course affords students a comprehensive overview of exterior envelope materials used in the construction of skeletal frame buildings dating from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries and provides an in-depth survey of historic interior materials. The focus of the course is modern materials, including thin masonry veneer, structural glass, adhesives and sealants, and laminated wood products, in addition to the investigation and analysis of paints and coatings. The course will introduce available methods for treating observed problems through research and hands-on material examination, both in the classroom and in the field.

Prerequisites: ARCH-102 or INTD-102 or AENGR-200 or CMGT-102


ARCST-300 2-2-3

Exhibition Design and Planning

The renaissance of museums, product display, and exhibitions has made the making of exhibitions a significant, recognizable, and highly valued skill as well as profession. This course covers the fundamentals of exhibition design, as well as its history, theory and practice. Through the use of lecture based case studies, field trips to exhibitions, and studio work, students will not only learn to develop, design, build, and document exhibitions, but to prepare written design proposals, didactic exhibition material, and exhibition critiques. Emphasis will be on the narrative used to create exhibitions, employing scale, color, materials, lighting, sound and graphics.

Prerequisite: ARCH-102 or INTD-102 or LARCH-102 or DSGNFND-203 or INDD-102


ARCST-302 3-0-3

Archival Research for Historic Preservation

Preservation practice relies upon archival, physical, and ethnographic evidence as a basis for establishing historic significance. This course affords in-depth study of the techniques, strategies, and resources employed by preservationists to collect data, using written, graphic, and oral primary and secondary sources. Lectures, discussions, and field trips to key archival repositories provide students with first-hand experience in collecting and interpreting documentary evidence to develop historical narratives in accordance with National Register of Historic Places standards.

Prerequisite: EDVS-221 (formerly ARCH-421) Intro to Historic Preservation or permission of program director.


ARCST-324 2-2-3

Historic Preservation Documentation: Drawing

Begun in 1933, the Historic American Building Survey (HABS) is the first federal preservation program established to document America’s architectural heritage. In this course, students learn the fundamentals of HABS documentation methods for the production of archival records of historic structures and places, utilizing technical drawing skills, both hand drafting and computer-aided drafting (CAD). Through field work and labs, students survey, sketch, draft, research, and annotate comprehensive, technically proficient drawings that represent the salient aspects of historic structures, complexes and sites in accordance with HABS standards.

Prerequisites: ARCHDSN-208


ARCST-341 3-0-3

American Architecture

What makes the built environment in America unique? How has American design changed over the generations? What were architects, clients, and critics thinking? Where will American architecture go in the future? Using history, sociology, and the humanities, we will address these types of questions as we examine American architecture according to themes such as the iconic American home, public buildings, buildings for work and play, and American architectural practice.

Prerequisites: AHIST-206 or LARCH-206


ARCST-409 3-0-3

The Great American City

The American city is examined from multiple viewpoints — historical, theoretical and critical — and with respect to specific communities, as well as to general issues. Themes include the initial founding of settlements and their growth, the architectural character of the communities and how character relates to the socioeconomic and physical environments, and the contribution of all these factors toward the specific image or reputation associated with America’s best known or “most typical” cities and towns. Field trips vary by semester and are required.

Prerequisites: AHIST-206 or LARCH-411


ARCST-410 3-0-3

Vernacular Architecture

This elective course provides the groundwork for the study of architecture built without architects or in some other way, unlike the buildings that comprise the standard architectural canon. Scholars estimate that 95 percent of buildings fall into this category. Depending on faculty expertise, focus will be on national and regional traditions, non-Western traditions or a combination of the two. Examples of vernacular architecture will be examined in the context of their materials, building technology, climate and culture.

Prerequisite: AHIST-206 or LARCH-206 or approval of the instructor


ARCST-422 3-0-3

Theories of Architecture: Seminar

This seminar will focus on selected topics that characterize architectural theory during the “Modern” era — from the late-19th century to the present. As a historical survey of the fundamental principles that have shaped architectural thinking, the course will review, in a critical way, the major issues that have influenced both the meaning of and the practice of architecture during that time: the relationship of architects to their work and to the culture-at-large; the impact of technology and politics; and the spatial experience of a building. Theorists’ critiques of contemporary practice will be emphasized, and current theories will be explored in an attempt to clarify an approach to the study and practice of architecture.

Prerequisites: AHIST-306 or LARCH-411


ARCST-425 3-0-3

Meaning in Architectural Ornamentation

This elective course raises some theoretical questions that are relevant to contemporary practice. What is ornament? How and why have attitudes toward architectural ornamentation changed through history? Is ornament essential to architecture? Lectures will be presented following a reconstructed chronology of theoretical topics; from the things (res materials) of which architecture consists; to the “rules” and “abuses” of classical ornament; to the role of imitation; to the effects of the Industrial and Post-industrial Revolutions on theories of ornament. The relationship between the forms and the materials of ornament will be examined in lecture and group discussions.

Prerequisite: AHIST-206 or LARCH-411


ARCST-428 2-2-3

Restoration/Rehabilitation Interiors

This is a lecture/lab course in which students work with period and historic spaces. The course introduces students to theories and techniques of adaptation and preservation of period spaces, preserving their historical integrity. The course will deal with applicable building codes, National Park Service standards of rehabilitation, designing within ADA guidelines and use of appropriate materials and lighting.

Prerequisites: AHIST-305 or LARCH-307


ARCST-434 3-0-3

Water and Architecture

The rich architecture of public water in urban and rural contexts is a key to the cultural landscape. From the gravity systems of a Roman city, through the rich world of medieval water, and concluding with water powered by outside energy, we will study Western, Arab and Asian water systems. Through architecture, the course will link the technology of water cycles, purity, collection and storage with the aesthetics and rituals of culture.

Prerequisite: SOC-2XX


ARCST-371 3-0-3

Design Theory: Special Topics

This upper-level course is organized to take advantage of faculty members’ expertise and the interests of the student body. All topics chosen require that students have completed basic courses in architectural history and theory, so that this course can focus on (1) an advanced analysis of theoretical texts in architecture, literary texts and buildings; and (2) an examination of architecture as a cultural discipline that seeks to accommodate contemporary human needs and natural situations.

Prerequisite: AHIST-306 or LARCH-411


AREAST-201 (Formerly L351) 3-0-3

Europe

A multidisciplinary study of European society, history and culture with emphasis on the 20th century. Through a variety of materials and approaches including fiction, visual sources, political commentary and cultural artifacts, this course will examine the rise of the European community and the continuing conflict between ethnic, cultural and political forces in the region.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-201S 3-0-3

Contemporary Europe (Study Abroad)

A multidisciplinary study of European society, history and culture with emphasis on the 20th century. Through a variety of materials and approaches including fiction, visual sources, political commentary and cultural artifacts, this course will examine the rise of the European community and the continuing conflict between ethnic, cultural and political forces in the region. This study abroad course is taught in Europe.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-202 (Formerly L352) 3-0-3

Latin America

A multidisciplinary introduction to Latin American history, society and culture through a variety of materials including literature, film, music, journalistic accounts and history with emphasis upon the 20th century. The course will emphasize the complex interplay between indigenous, Iberian and African influences in the forging of the continent’s past, present and future. Students will examine the roots of everyday and state violence, as well as the current controversies over “liberalization” and “market” economies.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-205 (Formerly L353) 3-0-3

East Asia

A multidisciplinary course examining the shifting relationship between “tradition” and “modernity” in East Asia. The course will explore such topics as kinship, gender relations and stratification systems in the Asian past and present. Students will investigate some of the different paths of development that Asian societies have followed in the last two centuries including communism and state-directed capitalism. The course will close with Asia’s increasing significance in the globalization of capitalism.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-208 (Formerly L354) 3-0-3

Africa

A multidisciplinary introduction to African civilization through a variety of sources including oral epics, film, music, literature, ethnographies, historical studies and visual materials with emphasis upon the 20th century. The course will investigate such topics as the cultural roots of African leadership, the enduring importance of family and community, the impact of the trans-Atlantic trade in human beings on African societies, the struggle to achieve a just, multi-ethnic society in Southern Africa and the present continent-wide democratization process.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-210 (Formerly L355) 3-0-3

Middle East

The contemporary Middle East will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective, including the region’s history, geography, politics, economy, religions and cultures with emphasis upon the 20th century. The course aims to promote an understanding of the social dynamics of this region, as well as to provide the basic tools for a better understanding of world events in general.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-220 (Formerly L356) 3-0-3

Great Britain: Study Abroad Preparation

An interdisciplinary study of Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) including social, political, economic and cultural issues with particular emphasis on the post-1945 period. Students will also learn how to understand cultural difference and to cope with culture shock. This course prepares students for study abroad programs in Great Britain. Open to all students.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-226 3-0-3

Italy: Study Abroad Preparation

A multidisciplinary study of Italy including social, political, economic and cultural issues with particular emphasis upon the post-1945 period; attention is given also to Italy’s role in Europe. The course also introduces students to how to learn a language and basic communication skills in Italian needed to cope with daily living in the society, with a special emphasis on issues relating to “culture shock” when living, working and studying in Italy.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-227 3-0-3

India and South Asia

A multidisciplinary introduction to the Asian Subcontinent, including the countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. The region’s modern history, geography, politics, economies, religions, cultures and social issues are each discussed in an integrative manner. Regional popular culture, including modern music, literature and cinema, are also analyzed in order to help students understand the rapidly changing nature of this region today.

Prerequisites: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


AREAST-383 (Formerly L949) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Area Studies

See the statement on Independent Study in the “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required. Also see appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


ARTH-101 (Formerly T771)3-0-3

History of Western Art I

The evolution of Western painting, sculpture and architecture from pre-history to the 16th century is covered. A thorough foundation in art and ideas with special emphasis on styles is presented as inspiration for designers.


ARTH-102 (Formerly T772)3-0-3

History of Western Art II

The evolution of Western painting, sculpture and architecture from the 16th century to the present is covered with the same emphasis on styles.


ARTH-314 (Formerly T773)3-0-3

History of Textiles and Costumes

A multi-faceted survey of textiles and costumes from ancient cultures to the present, technical- and visual-design aspects of the textile arts, the influence of trade on design trends, styles in period costume and the sociological implications of dress are all incorporated.

Prerequisite: VSDES-101 or FASHDES-2XX or FASHDES-423


ARTS-101 (also listed as DECPROC-101)1-5-3

Integrative Design Process

Design thinking is a shared process and key component of innovation for all fields within the College of Design, Engineering and Commerce. In this course, students will develop and refine abilities to construct, analyze and use the process of designing within an interdisciplinary, team based environment. Integrative Design Process is a part of the DEC core and is a mandatory course for all students in the College of Design, Engineering and Commerce. This course fulfills the Arts and Cultures requirement of the College Studies Program for students enrolled in the majors in the School of Business Administration and for students enrolled in majors in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.


ARTS-105 (Formerly HUMN-105 and L155)3-0-3

Music

Music is an important form of human expression and creativity. This course combines music appreciation with attention to why certain societies produced kinds of music. Previous knowledge of music is not required.


ARTS-120 (Formerly HUMN-120 and L151)3-0-3

Performing Arts

The purpose of this course is to help students acquire a critical appreciation both for the process of creating various forms of art and for the final products in theater, musical theater, opera and dance. The course will also explore how aesthetic values are influenced by society. Students will be required to attend professional performances in the Philadelphia area.


ARTS-123 (Formerly HUMN-123 and L152)3-0-3

Ideas and Images

Beginning with analysis of basic visual and compositional elements, students will discover how artists and designers have created images that express and reflect cultural values. Historical and cross-cultural connections are emphasized in seminar approach. May not be taken by any design or architecture major. This course may be used to satisfy a College Studies requirement. Architecture or Design Majors cannot use this course to satisfy the Arts and Culture category.


BCHEM-312 (Formerly S215)3-0-3

Biochemistry I

Biochemistry I introduces the student to protein chemistry, protein structure/function relationships and basic enzymology. It also covers chemistry of carbohydrates and lipids with particular emphasis on human metabolism of these compounds.

Corequsite: BIOL 312L

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in CHEM-202 and CHEM 202L


BCHEM-312L 0-4-1

Biochemistry I Lab

Biochemistry II continues the metabolic theme of Biochemistry I with emphasis on nitrogen-containing compounds (amino acids, urea cycle and nucleotide biosynthesis). Also considered are biological membranes, transmembrane transport and signaling. The course concludes with the biochemistry of polynucleotides (DNA and RNA) and protein biosynthesis and trafficking.

Corequsite: BIOL 313L

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL-312 and BIOL 312L


BCHEM-313 (Formerly S216)3-0-3

Biochemistry II
Biochemistry II continues the metabolic theme of Biochemistry I with emphasis on nitrogen-containing compounds (amino acids, urea cycle and nucleotide biosynthesis). Also considered are biological membranes, transmembrane transport and signaling. The course concludes with the biochemistry of polynucleotides (DNA and RNA) and protein biosynthesis and trafficing.

Corequsite: BIOL 313L
Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL-312 and BIOL 312L


BCHEM-313L0-4-1

Biochemistry II Lab

Biochemistry II lab continues the theme of Biochemistry I lab with studies on carbohydrate chemistry, lipid chemistry and handling of polynucleotides.

Corequsite: BIOL 313;

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in BIOL-312 and BIOL 312L


BIOL-101 (Formerly L311) 3-2-3

Current Topics in Biology

(for non-science majors)

Explore contemporary biological topics that you hear and read about or that are part of your daily life and learn the fundamental scientific concepts that underlie them. Topics will cover molecules to cells and organisms to populations as well as inheritance, development, infectious disease and what constitutes well-supported science. The course utilizes projects, hands-on activities, online discussions and group work to illustrate concepts.


BIOL-103 (Formerly L323) 3-0-3

Biology I

(required for Science majors)

The objective of this course is to gain an understanding of the cellular, molecular and genetic basis of life. Students will be introduced to the physical and chemical principles involved in biological processes, the microscopic world of the cell, regulation of gene expression and the laws that govern inheritance. This course and BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L Biology II are the introductory courses for science majors.

Co-requisite: BIOL-103L


BIOL-103L (Formerly L323) 0-3-1

;

Biology I Laboratory

This laboratory course reinforces the understanding of cellular, molecular and genetic processes learned in Biology I lecture. Exercises include microscopic examination of cells and tissues, biochemical analysis of enzyme activity, osmosis, cellular respiration and genetic investigation, including electrophoretic analysis of mutation.

Co-requisite: BIOL-103


BIOL-104 (Formerly S212) 3-0-3

Biology II

(for science majors)

In this course students will apply the principles learned in Biology I to the structure and function of organisms. Physiological processes that will be examined include nutrition, gas exchange, transport and regulation of body fluids, chemical and nervous control and reproduction.

Co-requisite: BIOL-104
Prerequisite: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-103 and BIOL-103L


BIOL-104L (Formerly S212) 0-3-1

Biology II Laboratory

Co-requisite: BIOL-104

Prerequisites: grade of “C-“ (1.67) or better in BIOL-103 and BIOL-103L


BIOL-201 (Formerly S218) 3-0-3

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence. This course will examine anatomical and physiological aspects of the following systems of humans: tissues, integumentary, musculoskeletal and neurologic. A close correlation between lecture and laboratory topics will be maintained. During lecture, both anatomy and physiology will be discussed however greater emphasis will be placed on the physiology of each system while during the laboratory session, greater emphasis will be placed on anatomy.

Co-requisite: BIOL-201L

Prerequisites: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-201L (Formerly S218) 0-2-1

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

The A&P laboratory sessions will provide students with hands-on learning opportunities to help conceptualize content discussed in lecture. During lab, students will work on problem sets, examine and dissect organs and/or anatomical models, use microscopes, perform basic physiological experiments and examine cadaver specimens. During laboratory sessions of the first half of this two-semester course, emphasis will be placed on the anatomy of the relevant system.

Co-requisite: BIOL-201

Prerequisites: grade of “C-“ (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-202 (Formerly S219) 3-0-3

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is the second of a two semester sequence. This course will examine anatomical and physiological aspects of the following systems of humans: sensory, endocrine, circulation, respiration, nutrition-digestion, excretion and reproductive. During lecture, both anatomy and physiology will be discussed. While some lab sessions will focus mainly on the anatomy of the current system, most laboratory sessions will involve physiological experiments to provide students with greater insight into the physiology of the current system. A close correlation between lecture and laboratory topics will be maintained.

Co-requisite: BIOL-202L

Prerequisites: BIOL-201 and BIOL-201L


BIOL-202L (Formerly S219) 0-2-1

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

The A&P laboratory sessions will provide students with hands-on learning opportunities to help conceptualize content discussed in lecture. During lab, students will work on problem sets, examine and dissect organs and/or anatomical models, use microscopes, perform basic physiological experiments and examine cadaver specimens. While some lab sessions will focus mainly on the anatomy of the current system, most laboratory sessions will involve physiological experiments to provide students with greater insight into the physiology of the current system.

Co-requisite: BIOL-202.

Prerequisites: BIOL-201 and BIOL 201L


BIOL-204 (Formerly S213) 3-0-3

Cell Biology

This course focuses on both structure and function of cellular components. Cellular structure is investigated from the molecular level to macromolecular assemblies and organelles with the major emphasis on how these structures function to form a dynamic cell interacting with its environment. Cell growth, reproduction and communication are discussed. Cells studies include single cells to those organized into tissues in multicellular organisms.

Co-requisite: BIOL-204L

Prerequisites: CHEM-201 and CHEM-201L, grade of “C–” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-204L (Formerly S213) 0-3-1

Cell Biology Laboratory

The purpose of this laboratory is to introduce the student to some of the procedures and techniques used to investigate cell structure and function, including use of the microscope, differential cell fractionation and biochemical exercises.

Co-requisite: BIOL-204

Prerequisite: CHEM-201 and CHEM 201L, grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-205 (Formerly S217) 3-0-3

Plant Biology

(writing intensive)

Students will study the diversity and evolution of plants, their structure, selected physiological processes and current topics in plant biology.

Co-requisite: BIOL-205L

Prerequisites: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-205L (Formerly S217) 0-3-1

Plant Biology Laboratory

(writing intensive)

This laboratory course includes the examination of algae to flowering plants, and cells, tissues and organs to whole plants. Plant species will be propagated by cloning and spore culture.

Co-requisite: BIOL-205

Prerequisites: grade of “C–” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-207 (Formerly S227) 3-0-3

Principles of Genetics

This course will consider Mendelian genetics and the contributions of other early research on our present knowledge. Included will be crossover consequences, gene mapping, sex linkage, statistical genetics, mutation, chromosome abnormalities and human genetics.

Co-requisite: BIOL-207 L, Prerequisite: grade of “C-” or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-207L (Formerly S227) 0-3-1

Principles of Genetics Laboratory

This is the laboratory course that must be taken to complete the genetics requirement. The laboratory exercises use current techniques of DNA technology as applied to disease diagnosis, forensic determinations and the isolation and structural examination of the DNA molecule.

Co-requisite: BIOL-207, Prerequisites: grade of “C–” or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-209 (Formerly S235) 3-0-3

Medicinal Plants

(writing intensive)

This course focuses on the use of plants and plant products in human health. Topics include a survey of plants and plant families with medicinal properties, their cultivation and conservation, physiological effects of plant extracts, plant-derived drugs, historical and cultural aspects of medicinal plant use.

Prerequisite: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-221 (Formerly S221) 3-0-3

Microbiology

(Writing Intensive)

This course provides an introduction to environmental, industrial, food and medical microbiology. An understanding of the methods by which microbes produce disease, as well as interact with body surfaces to maintain human health, is also discussed.

Co-requisite: BIOL-221L

Prerequisites: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-221L (Formerly S221) 0-3-1

Microbiology Laboratory

Laboratories are designed to complement and expand information from lectures. Students will gain experience in classical techniques used by environmental and clinical microbiologists for determining unknown bacteria and molds. Practical studies will also compare historical and current methods for physical and chemical removal of microbes.

Co-requisites: BIOL-221

Prerequisites: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-302 3-0-3

Medical Genetics

This course in medical genetics deals with the definition of the role of genetic variation and mutation in a predisposition to disease, modifying the course of disease or causing the disease itself. It will cover single gene defects caused by a critical error in the information carried by a single gene, diseases due to an excess or deficiency of the genes contained in whole chromosomes or segments of chromosomes, and multifactorial inheritance diseases which result of more than one genes which can act together to produce or predispose to a serious defect. The course will also introduce methods of collecting and interpreting a family history as an integral tool in medical genetics, and integrate this in all aspects of the presentation.

Prerequisites: BIOL-207 and BIOL-207L


BIOL-303 (Formerly S236) 3-3-4

Histology

Histology provides students with an integrated perspective of how adaptations in physiology, biochemistry and morphology allow cellular organization into human organs and support systems. Laboratory studies will introduce students to abnormal embryology, which is the core of many aspects of disease, especially those affecting children. Along with analysis of prepared slides, students will learn to interpret and present abnormal histology/embryology in the form of “case histories.”

Prerequisites: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L and junior status


BIOL-307 3-0-3

Developmental Genetics

This course is an elective for students who have completed BIOL 104/104L and required for those in the genetics minor. It will consider animal embryology from gametogenesis (of sperm and egg) to organogenesis (development of organs) and specification with emphasis placed the genes controlling these processes. The course includes cytogenesis (development of cells) and morphogenesis (genes which control change in body form) of the developing embryo.

Prerequisite: grade of C-(1.67)or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-315 (Formerly S228) 3-0-3

Immunology (writing intensive)

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the innate mechanisms by which the human body prevents infection, as well as those involved in specifically acquired immunity. Topics include the structural, functional and genetic aspects of a fully competent immune system that can successfully prevent attack by millions of microorganisms each day. Exploration of the many medical conditions which result from hyperactive- or impaired-immune responses, including allergy, autoimmunity, cancer and AIDS, are studied.

Prerequisites: BIOL-221 and BIOL-221L


BIOL-371 (Formerly S220) 3-0-3 or 3-3-4

Selected Topics in Biology

This course provides an opportunity to explore topics in biology not developed in other courses. Examples include specialized areas of organismal biology, conservation biology, developmental and molecular biology. Students may take this course more than once as the topics differ each time it is offered.

Prerequisite: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L or permission of instructor


BIOL-391 (Formerly S231) 0-9-3

Research in Biology I

Independent research is taken under the guidance of a faculty member. The research will include a written proposal prior to initiation of the project, a literature search, experimental work, a written abstract and report upon completion of the semester and an oral presentation of the work. Guidelines for approval and for final evaluation are available in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts office.

Prerequisite: permission of the academic associate dean of undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.


BIOL-392 (Formerly S232) 0-9-3

Research in Biology II

Continuation of BIOL-391.

Prerequisites: BIOL-391, permission of the academic associate dean of undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.


BIOL-401 (Formerly S214) 3-3-4

Molecular Biology

The first segment of this course deals with molecular genetics with emphasis on in-class experiments. This is followed by a detailed treatment of the molecular basis of genetics, involving the structure and functions of the DNA molecule, chromosome maps, etc. The course concludes with a seminar-type discussion of disease states that have been shown to be genetically linked.

Prerequisite: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-402 3-0-3

Genetics Seminar

(writing intensive)

This writing intensive course will expose the student to the fields of population genetics and several emerging and important subdisciplines (behavioral, conservation and evolutionary genetics). Human health will be a recurring theme. The seminar format will encourage an independent learning experience. Papers and presentations will build research, communication and critical thinking skills.

Prerequisites BIOL 207 and BIOL 207L, WRTG 2XX


BIOL-407 (Formerly S229) 3-3-4

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

A comparative study of the structure, function and evolutionary relationships of the major vertebrate groups.

Prerequisite: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


BIOL-409 (Formerly S230) 3-3-4

Cellular Analysis

This course will teach fundamental methods of contemporary cellular and biotechnology. Laboratory exercises focus on microscopic, biochemical and molecular analysis of cells and cell structures.

Prerequisites: BIOL-204 and BIOL-204L


BIOL-411 (Formerly S298) 3-0-3

Life Science Seminar

(writing intensive)

The course covers recent advances in the biological and medical sciences by way of formal presentations and discussions involving both students and invited faculty. In addition, students will learn techniques for the preparation of a research project involving a literature search. Students will be required to carry out a research project and present a formal seminar on this work to their peers.

Prerequisites: grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 AND BIOL-104L and senior status


BIOL-413 3-3-4

Pathology

Pathology represents an integrated perspective of how disease results from a series of common, underlying changes resulting from initial and continued cell stresses. Students will relate disease processes to the symptoms and signs reported by patients and interpreted by physicians through the use of case history presentation and will acquire a variety of light microscopy techniques routinely used in hospitals for the diagnosis and monitoring of abnormal pathology.

Prerequisites: BIOL-202 and/or BIOL-303


BIOL-493, BIOL-494 (Formerly S290, S291) 0-0-3, 0-0-3

Preceptorship I and II

The preceptorship experience is designed to enhance the student’s knowledge, technical skills and problem-solving abilities within the biomedical science realm. These studies will be performed off campus under the supervision of biomedical professionals and other practitioners in the medical sciences, previously approved by the program director. Designed to be taken as summer classes between the sophomore and junior years. A minimum of 54-hours required, preferably as six, one-week periods of nine hours per week.


BLAW-301 (Formerly B421)3-0-3

Business Law I
Lecture, class discussion and case problems emphasizing legal principles on the following topics: the legal environment, government regulation of business, contracts, personal property, environmental liability as it relates to business transactions, bankruptcy, employment and human resources, and current legal issues. The legal environment as it impacts business decision making is addressed.


BUS-3173-0-3

Opportunity Finding in Emerging Markets
Students learn how to describe, visualize, develop and assess a business model by utilizing design thinking and qualitative research methods within a cultural immersion context and through a combination of classroom seminars and experiential instructions. Central to this learning process is identifying value propositions for a range of fields in the private sector and non-profit sectors. While abroad, students will have daily seminars from area experts and site visits to organizations representing diverse industry sectors.

Prerequisite: Students who have completed 60 credits or more.


CAD-201 (Formerly T122) 2-2-3

This course focuses on increasing the student’s individual level of computer literacy through the exploration of the basic structure of the operating system, general internet skills and the fundamentals of both raster and vector based software. Course projects provide hands-on experience with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator software.


CAD-204 (Formerly T126) 2-2-3

CAD for Fashion Design

Computer-aided design is utilized in every segment of the fashion industry from concept development, fabric design and illustration to line development, technical drawing, and presentations. Students learn CAD software and gain skills utilized in a variety of industry-related projects.

Prerequisite: FASHDES-252 , FASHDRW-207


CAD-206 (Formerly I342) 1-4-3

CAD I for Industrial Design

The course introduces students to computer-aided design with a focus on the industrial design processes. In an intuitive fashion, students create and refine designs using a solids-modeling software package. In order to recognize the critical role CAD plays in the development of designs, students will use designs created in design studio courses as the subject matter of the CAD activities. Design-control drawings, three-dimensional rendered drawings and perspective drawings will be the course’s output.


CAD-301 (Formerly T123) 1-5-3

Advanced Digital Imaging for Textile Design

This course focuses on both the conceptual and technical aspects of digital portfolio presentation for the textile designer. Course projects provide an in-depth exploration of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver software.

Prerequisites: CAD-201


CAD-306 (Formerly I621) 1-4-3

CAD II: Digital Design Techniques

This course will build upon principles introduced in introductory CAD courses. It is primarily a laboratory course in which students will learn to take their early design concepts through to the final presentation using advanced digital design techniques. Students will use multiple digital design software packages across computer platforms with an emphasis on CAD packages such as NURBS modelers and animation software, as well as vector-based, desktop-publishing programs and bitmap-based programs.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in CAD-206 or permission of the instructor


CAD-401 (Formerly T125) 2-2-3

Apparel CAD/CAM

A comprehensive course that incorporates software widely used in the apparel industry where patterns are created then graded and made into markers. Industry standards and specifications are followed for each area. Students use software to solve problems and increase productivity.

Prerequisite: FASHDES-213


CHEM-101 (Formerly L312)3-2-3

General Chemistry

(for non-science majors)

This course allows students to pursue further study of chemical issues as they relate to the consumer and to health. Students will become familiar with issues surrounding the use of everyday products such as laundry products, personal-care products, plastics, fibers and food additives. Also included are an introduction to organic chemistry, biochemistry and the chemistry of some health-related issues. Students should complete this course with an awareness of the complexities of the chemical structures in their daily lives and the issues involving their use and abuse, so that they may make more informed decisions.


CHEM-103 (Formerly L321) 4-0-3

Chemistry I

(required for Science and Engineering majors)

An introduction to the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, including the properties of matter, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, energy and thermochemistry, atomic structure and the periodic table. Basic knowledge of algebra, geometry and trigonometry is presumed. Students enrolled in MATH-099 may not take this course. This course is not recommended for students enrolled in WRTG-099 or READ-099 fundamentals courses.

Co-requisite: CHEM-103L


CHEM-103L (Formerly L321) 0-3-1

Chemistry I Laboratory

(required for Science and Engineering majors)

This hands-on laboratory-based course highlights concepts covered in Chemistry I Lecture. Emphasis is placed on developing good laboratory and data analysis skills. Experiments include acid/base titrations, heat determination using calorimeters and oxidation/reduction reactions.

Co-requisite: CHEM-103


CHEM-104 (Formerly C112) 4-0-3

Chemistry II

(required for science majors)

This course is a continuation of CHEM 103 Chemistry I that provides an introduction to chemical bonding and molecular geometry, property of gases, intermolecular attractions, solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases and thermodynamics.

Co-requisite: CHEM-104L

Prerequisites: CHEM-103 and CHEM-103L


CHEM-104L (Formerly C112) 0-3-1

Chemistry II Laboratory

(required for science majors)

This hands-on laboratory-based course highlights concepts covered in Chemistry II lectures. Analytical and data interpretation/presentation skills are honed through a series of experiments including aspirin synthesis and determination of vitamin C content.

Co-requisite: CHEM-104L

Prerequisites: CHEM-103 and CHEM-103L


CHEM-201 (Formerly C121) 3-0-3

Organic Chemistry I

First semester in a 2-semester lecture series on Organic Chemistry. Topics include origin and history of organic chemistry; chemical bonding, structure and properties of organic compounds; structure, properties and nomenclature of the alkanes; stereochemistry, and a comprehensive discussion of the substitution and elimination reactions of alkyl halides.

Co-requisites: CHEM-202L

Prerequisite: CHEM-104 and CHEM 104L


CHEM-201L (Formerly C121L) 0-4-1

Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

First semester in a 2-semester companion course to Organic Chemistry Lecture. Topics include practical instruction in basic organic chemistry laboratory techniques such as recrystallization, distillation, extraction, reflux, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and IR spectroscopy. Utilizing these techniques, the synthesis and characteristic reactions of alkyl halides are explored.

Co-requisites: CHEM-201

Prerequisites: CHEM-104 and CHEM-104L


CHEM-202 (Formerly C122) 3-0-3

Organic Chemistry II

Second semester in a 2-semester lecture series on Organic Chemistry. Topics include the structure, nomenclature, synthesis and characteristic reactions of alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones & aromatic compounds.

Co-requisite: CHEM-202L

Prerequisite: CHEM 201 and 201L


CHEM-202L (Formerly C122L) 0-4-1

Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Second semester in a 2-semester companion course to Organic Chemistry Lecture. Utilizing techniques learned in first semester, the synthesis and characteristic reactions of alkenes, alcohols, aromatics and aldehydes/ketones are studied.


CHEM-206 3-3-4

Forensic Chemistry

Students will become acquainted with the various sub-disciplines of forensic science with emphasis on the chemical principles used to collect, process, identify, quantify and qualify crime scene/victim evidence. Through lectures and case studies, the scientific foundations for the examination of physical, chemical and biological evidence will be explored. Laboratory sessions will provide hands on experience with modern forensic techniques used to analyze physical evidence such as blood, glass and fibers. The course will culminate with a mock trial in which students present the results of their analytical investigations to a jury.

Prerequisites: CHEM-104, CHEM-104L, BIO-104, BIO-104L


CHEM-214 (Formerly C123) 3-0-3

Bioorganic Chemistry

This course is a one-semester overview of organic chemistry and biochemistry for PA majors and open to those who meet the prerequisites. After introduction to different functional groups, the course provides a systematic study of the biologically important compounds, including amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, carbohydrates and lipids. Emphasis will be placed upon the structure, properties and functions of these compounds. The course will culminate in an overarching discussion of the intricacies of metabolism of some of these biomolecules.

Prerequisites: CHEM-104 and CHEM 104L, grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


CHEM-305 (Formerly C131) 3-4-4

Physical Chemistry I

Fundamental topics in thermodynamics are covered, emphasizing the first three laws of thermodynamics. Applications of these principles and chemical equilibrium to ideal gases, real gases, solutions and solids are discussed. Chemical kinetics is covered in detail. A brief examination of the field of chemical dynamics is included. Where appropriate, current research in these areas will be discussed. The laboratory will emphasize using chemistry techniques such as FTIR, UV-Vis, GC and computational programs to examine fundamental physical processes.

Prerequisites: CHEM-202 and CHEM 202L, PHYS-203 and PHYS-203L, and pre or Co-requisite MATH-213


CHEM-306 (Formerly C132) 3-4-4

Physical Chemistry II

Quantum mechanics is the fundamental theory underlying the description of atoms. It details how atoms can interact on the microscopic level. Quantum mechanics will be used to understand the observed spectroscopic properties of atoms and molecules. Statistical mechanics, which connects the macroscopic world of thermodynamics and kinetics with quantum mechanics, will also be covered. The laboratory is a continuation of CHEM-305 with an emphasis on spectroscopy.

Prerequisite: CHEM-305


CHEM-309 (Formerly C142) 3-3-4

Inorganic Chemistry

An advanced course in modern inorganic chemistry that covers structure and bonding, symmetry, thermodynamics and mechanisms, along with a systematic discussion of reactions and properties of representative main group and transition metal elements. This course will also illustrate some of the relationships between inorganic chemistry and other areas of chemistry, including biochemistry. The laboratory covers a variety of synthetic techniques and physical and analytical methodologies that are particularly applicable to inorganic compounds.

Prerequisite: CHEM-306


CHEM-323 (Formerly C193) 3-3-4

Instrumental Methods of Analysis

(writing intensive)

This course provides an overview of the variety of analytical and instrumental methods for quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis. Topics include gravimetric and volumetric analysis; ultraviolet, infrared and visible spectroscopy; gas and liquid chromatography; and mass spectrometry. Laboratory sessions hone students’ analytical- and critical- thinking skills. Students are required to work on a group research project and present their findings at a local/regional scientific conference.

Prerequisite: CHEM-202 and CHEM 202L


CHEM-371 (Formerly C199) 3-0-3

Selected Topics in Chemistry

A study of a specialized topic and/or recent developments in one of the fields of chemistry. Sample topics might include theoretical organic chemistry, spectroscopy, photochemistry, stereo-chemistry and computational chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHEM-202 and CHEM 202L


CHEM-391 (Formerly C231) 0-9-3

Research I in Chemistry

Students interested in pursuing independent research in any field of chemistry or biochemistry under faculty supervision must submit a proposal to the academic associate dean of undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts for approval at least two weeks before pre-registration. The research will include both literature search and experimental work in any current field of chemistry or biochemistry. At the end of the semester, students will be expected to do an oral presentation to the faculty during reading days and prepare a comprehensive written report as mandated by the American Chemical Society.

Prerequisite: permission of academic associate dean for undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.


CHEM-392 (Formerly C232) 0-9-3

Research II in Chemistry

Continuation of CHEM-391


CHEM-405 (Formerly C171) 3-0-3

Advanced Organic Chemistry

(writing intensive)

An in-depth study of the factors that affect organic reactions such as solvent, energy, kinetic and steric factors. These are used to examine a variety of reaction mechanisms such as nucleophilic substitution, elimination, aromatic substitution and rearrangement reactions.

Prerequisite: CHEM-202 and CHEM 202L


CHEM-410 (Formerly C172) 3-0-3

Polymer Chemistry

Physical and chemical study of natural and synthetic polymers based on the mechanism of polymer formation, including such topics as stereochemistry, cationic, anionic and free radical polymerization reactions and the formation of stereospecific polymers by use of heterogeneous catalysts.

Prerequisite: CHEM-405


CHEM-417 (Formerly S431) 3-3-4

Environmental Chemistry

Environmental Chemistry will allow students to develop a general understanding of the role of chemistry and physiochemical concepts in the development, identification and solution of environmental problems. This course will provide the necessary background for conducting chemical analyses on water, air and soil samples. The skills learned in this course will be employed in learning more about the application of chemical principles in solving environmental problems.

Prerequisite: CHEM-104 and CHEM 104L


CHEM-418 (Formerly S443) 3-3-4

Advanced Aquatic and Atmospheric Chemistry

This course will allow students to become familiar with the chemistry of environmental issues confronting humankind. This course will not only expand on CHEM-417, but will emphasize real-world applications. These applications will be handled with the use of thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base equilibria, redox reactions, complex formation and surface complexation, to name a few. The investigative and problem-solving techniques and the analytical skills learned in this class will be employed throughout the student’s lifetime and are presently demanded by industrial, research and remediation firms.

Prerequisites: CHEM-202 and CHEM 202L, CHEM-417


CHINE-1013-0-3

Chinese I

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


CHINE-2013-0-3

Chinese II

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


CMGT-1012-2-3

Construction Graphics

The course is an introduction to the nature and vocabulary of graphical expression used in construction drawings, details and sketches in the architectural, structural, civil, mechanical and electrical engineering disciplines. Students develop an appreciation for the importance of effective graphical documentation and interpret drawings in terms of form, size, distance, quantity and interrelation of elements. Emphasis is placed on effective sketched, verbal and written expression of drawing interpretations to audiences not familiar with construction drawings.

Prerequisites: None, Students not majoring in Construction Management must have permission from the Program Director.


CMGT-102 (Formerly ARCH-427) 3-0-3

Introduction to the Construction Industry

Through analysis of the relevant case studies, this course examines construction management concepts and principles as applied to contemporary practice and investigates the intersecting roles of construction manager, architect, client and general contractor. Topics include planning, programming and documentation from pre-construction to project close-out; legal aspects relative to environmental protection, public and worker safety, contract documents, insurance and bonds; labor relations and inspection; project control, total quality management and ethics in construction management.

Prerequisites: None.


CMGT-104 (Formerly ARCH-428) 3-0-3

Introduction to the Construction Management

Utilizing pertinent case studies, this course focuses upon the planning and scheduling stages of the building process, with particular emphasis upon reading construction documents and basic estimating principles applied to small-scale, residential and commercial projects. Construction site procedures, as well as techniques for estimating unit quantities and costs of materials, labor and equipment, are introduced and given industry application utilizing building specifications and computer software.

Prerequisites: CMGT-102 (Formerly ARCH-427)


CMGT-200 2-2-3

Construction Project Planning and Scheduling

This course provides a study and application of the tools and concepts used in planning and controlling construction projects. Students employ the Critical Path Method (CPM) of project scheduling, resource leveling and time-cost analysis using manual and computer-based solution methods to develop and maintain working project schedule models.

Prerequisites: CMGT 104 (Formerly ARCH 428) Introduction to Construction Project Management and CMGT 101 Construction Graphics or, permission of the Program Director.


CMGT-202 2-2-3

Construction Cost Estimating and Budgeting

This experiential course familiarizes students with manual and computer aided techniques of contract document quantity surveys, estimated cost calculations and the development and maintenance of purchase and management budgets.

Prerequisites: CMGT-104 (Formerly ARCH-428) and CMGT-101 or permission of the Program Director


CMGT-204 3-0-3

Behavior of Materials

This course familiarizes students with the mechanical behavior of materials and systems in

equilibrium using Newton's laws of motion. Students will examine the principles of force

equilibrium, construct free-body diagrams, and model the effect on various structural shapes and

materials under load.

Prerequisite: MATH-103 or MATH-111 and PHYS-101


CMGT-206 3-0-3

Building Systems

This course introduces students to the foundation, structural, envelope, Mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and automation systems and their interaction in a functioning building facility. Emphasis is placed on value achieved through constructability, performance, and sustainability characteristics. Prerequisite: CMGT 102


CMGT- 300 3-0-3

Construction Accounting and Cost Control

This course familiarizes students with construction cost accounting systems and reporting formats. Students will examine the sources of cost data and report generation and will evaluate performance based on analysis of data for labor, material, equipment, and subcontract cost. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of management decisions and the ongoing evaluation of their effectiveness.

Prerequisite: CMGT 202, ACCT 101


CMGT-302 3-0-3

Construction Contact Administration

This course familiarizes students with the various forms of contract used in the construction industry and best practices for their administration and management. Through exploration of cases and current events, students will explore contract operation regarding rights, duties, responsibilities, claims management and assignment of risk. Emphasis is placed on the management of contracts as a means for the achievement of overall project success.

Prerequisite: CMGT 102.


CMGT-304 3-0-3

Construction Safety and Risk Management

This course familiarizes students with best practices for risk identification, assessment, and mitigation for construction businesses and projects. Students will examine case examples of construction industry businesses and construction project site conditions, identify and assess specific risks, and formulate management plans to mitigate and manage the risks. Particular emphasis is placed on OSHA compliance and worksite safety management. Prerequisite: CMGT 102


CMGT-306 3-0-3

Construction Site Operations

This course familiarizes students with methods, procedures, and practices required for the effective management of field operations preparing students to assess construction project sites and prepare comprehensive site management plans. The course explores aspects of sitemanagement such as layout, logistics, sustainable practices, administration, and false work in a hands-on collaborative environment. Prerequisite: CMGT 102.


CMGT-308 0-1-1

Construction Safety Lab

This one hour course deepens student awareness and understanding of jobsite safety hazards, mitigation techniques, and OSHA Regulation compliance. Particular emphasis is placed on hands-on practical application of the principles covered in CMGT 3xx, Construction Safety and Risk Management. Prerequisite: CMGT 102, Co - requisite: CMGT 304


CMGT 499 1-4-3

Construction Capstone Project

This course develops a higher level understanding of the construction process by examining the problem solving that begins with conception and progresses through the completion, start-up and maintenance of a project. Utilizing technical design drawings and Building Information Modeling (BIM) software, this course provides an opportunity to simulate the progressive stages of a construction project, thereby synthesizing knowledge and skills acquired in previous coursework.

Prerequisites: CMGT 3xx or Permission of the Program Director


COLLST-499 (Formerly L911)4-0-4

Contemporary Perspectives
(writing intensive)

The capstone seminar of the College Studies program, this writing intensive-course examines the origins and impact of current international trends with an emphasis on the period since World War II. Students also address questions of intercultural understanding at the global, regional and local level. A final research paper requires students to connect these global trends with issues in their profession.

Prerequisites: Humanities I, one course from AREAST-2XX or Foreign Languages and one Junior Seminar. May not be taken CR/NC.


COMM-1003-0-3

Introduction to Professional Communication

Students in this course learn methods, technologies and vocabulary relevant to the field of professional communication. Students apply that learning as they practice multiple types of writing and other means of communication integral to contemporary professional communication. Using perspectives of both theory and practice, students also discuss complex issues that arise from professional communication in various technologies and across cultural contexts. Required for Professional Communication majors. Prerequisites: None


COMM-105 3-0-3

Design as Communication

Students learn to apply basic principles and elements of design as they relate to communication. Through a study of found examples of visual design and by applying design concepts to their own work, students learn to explain how hierarchy of information, sequence of delivery and juxtaposition of type and image all build toward audience trust and understanding of the visual experience. In addition, students will explore wider implications of considering design as communication.

(Not available to majors from the School of Design and Engineering or the College of Architecture and the Built Environment)


COMM-200 3-0-3

Reading the Visual

(writing intensive)

Students will analyze various visual genres such as comics, graphic novels, movies, advertisements and political cartoons to learn how the visual elements of texts affect understanding. Students will examine the considerations required for communicating in visual media and will produce a multimedia project and a final researched project.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


COMM-202 3-0-3

Survey of Research Methods

(writing intensive)

Students in this course analyze and design survey instruments, polls, samples and other quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students learn about the ethics of research, especially regarding human subjects. The course includes introduction to electronic resources, print resources, archiving data, mining data, information architecture, database management and ethnography in business and design.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


COMM-204 3-0-3

Technologies of Communication

The social media course that’s an essential component of the major. Students will consider communication technologies and how and what people communicate using those technologies. We’ll examine the role of communication technologies in society and culture, with an emphasis on how they function in the information age. This will include both the social and cultural influences that have shaped the development of various emerging media, information, and communication technologies.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


COMM-303 3-0-3

Technical Writing

(writing intensive)

Students will learn to write and design documents in a variety of technical genres, including executive summaries, reports, instructions, among others, for technical and professional audiences. The course will usually take place in a discussion or workshop format and will use case studies based on real-world situations. Because technical writing in the workplace is often collaborative, students will often work in teams during class and on the final project.

Prerequisite: COMM-100


COMM-305 3-0-3

Multimedia Presentation

Students in this course learn to marry the basics of effective public speaking with visual technology, to allow them to make effective and professional quality presentations. Students will master these technologies and intensively practice speaking in front of an audience. In addition, students will study the standards of professional presentation that befit different audiences.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


COMM-307 3-0-3

Public Relations and Media Writing

(writing intensive)

Students in this course learn the fundamentals of writing for multiple public audiences in multiple communication formats and genres. Areas addressed include public relations, public affairs, media relations and press releases. Students will also learn to judge the importance of information as well as set priorities and tailor writing to meet the needs of different audiences.

Prerequisites: COMM-100


COMM-400 3-0-3

Usability Testing

(writing intensive)

Usability testing is a technique used to measure a document or website’s capacity to meet its intended purpose. The process of usability testing gives direct input on how the anticipated audience will use the product and is critical to product development. This course provides an overview of usability tools and techniques, and then focuses on usability testing. Through discussion, reading and practice, students learn the concepts and techniques needed to conduct a usability test.

Prerequisite: COMM-202 and COMM-303


COMM-402 3-0-3

Professional Ethics in Communication

(writing intensive)

This course, designed for the senior in professional communication, will focus on important ethical issues facing the profession and its practitioners. The course will not advocate for particular ethical standards, but it will strive to motivate students to critically and analytically think about standards that are germane to their personal and professional lives, to consider reasons why current standards are in place and to evaluate whether current ethical standards are sufficient, workable and understood by communication professionals.

Prerequisites: COMM-202 and COMM-307


COMM-404 3-0-3

Professional Communication Capstone Portfolio Project

(writing intensive)

This course, designed for the senior in professional communication, will focus on integrating his/her college course work through developing a capstone portfolio. By working on a capstone portfolio that draws on prior course work and that culminates in an oral presentation and a written project, students will use their critical thinking skills in synthesizing previous course work to extend and develop their original ideas.

Prerequisites: COMM-307 and COMM-400


DECFRM-2003-0-3

Business Models

Students in this course apply and extend skills from DEC101, including design thinking, teamwork, and project management within the framework of a customer-centric approach to organizations and business models. The course explores business model innovation, execution, and strategy to examine industries and organizations, and applies these concepts in financial, social, political, and environmental contexts. As a culminating assignment, student teams build and defend their own unique business models.

Prerequisite: DEC101.


DECPROC-101 (also listed as ARTS-101) 2-2-3

Integrative Design Process

Design thinking is a shared process and key component of innovation for all fields within the College of Design, Engineering and Commerce. In this course, students will develop and refine abilities to construct, analyze and use the process of designing within an interdisciplinary, team based environment. Integrative Design Process is a part of the DEC core and is a mandatory course for all students in the College of Design, Engineering and Commerce. This course also fulfills the Arts and Cultures requirement of the College Studies Program for students enrolled in the majors in the School of Business Administration or for students enrolled in majors in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.


DECMTHD 300 3-0-3

Ethnographic Research Methods

This course explores a range of ethnographic research tools to analyze human belief, behavior and cultural practices. Students learn to formulate better research questions and conduct ethnographic research to address a contemporary social problem, and will become equipped to analyze and communicate the findings. Students reflect upon their impact in the community and on other ethical questions as part of conducting ethnographic research. Pre requisites: WRTG-2xx, SOC-2xx


DECSYS-202 (also listed as SCI-202) 3-0-3

Materials Selection

The materials available to meet design requirements for a specific application often limit performance in disciplines ranging from engineering and architecture, through industrial design, to fashion design and textiles. In fact, material selection is often the limiting performance factor in designing new products and processes. This course explores the governing principles of materials science, with a specific emphasis on using the scientific method to develop a “system approach” to materials selection at various stages of the design process.

(This course can be used to satisfy a college studies/general education science requirement.)


DECSYS-206 (also listed as SCI-106)3-0-3

Biology for Design: From Biological Adaptation to Biomimetic Design

The goal of this course is to increase the sophistication of design, engineering, business and other students regarding how design manifests itself in nature as biological adaptation, and to use that knowledge as a launching pad for thinking about biomimetic design. Biomimicry is a hot topic in architecture and design. Work in this field is usually done by designers working in collaboration with biologists who are highly specialized in a particular area, often plant or animal physiology. However, there are certain conceptual underpinnings pertaining to design and adaptation in nature that designers are often lacking that will prepare them for further exploration of this field. The course consists of two major units, the first focusing on the biology of adaptation from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. The second section consists of a survey of biomimetic design and how biomimicry has been employed to solve a range of design problems in architecture, materials science, systems design and technology.

Prerequisites: None


DECSYS-208 (also listed as SCI-108) 2-3-3

Sustainability & Eco-Innovations

The emerging fields of sustainability and environmental sciences will be surveyed to highlight how entrepreneurs are capitalizing on rapid environmental transformation. The rate, scale and degree of global environmental change, key scientific feedback loops the regional differences in terms of impacts and opportunities will be analyzed. Case studies of eco-innovation strategies employed by businesses and designers will be explored so that students can create their own scientific monitoring and evaluation plan for implementing a simple eco-innovation.

Prerequisites: None


DIGD-206 (Formerly D323)1-5-3

Foundations in Web Design and Strategy

This course will be an exploration into the design process and techniques for creating interactive experiences. This will be first step in learning to think and work as a web designer. We will cover a basic understanding of information architecture, usability, front end programming logic and design literacy. We will also discuss the principles of raster and vector electronic imaging as a means to provide a solid foundation needed to succeed in the interactive design field.

Prerequisite: ADFND-102 or DSGNFND-203 or GRAPH-202 or permission of the Director of the Interactive Design & Media or Graphic Design Communication program.


DIGD-301 (Formerly D511) 0-10-5

Interactive Design I

This studio explores the principles and strategies involved in designing and producing effective interactive publications. Issues of navigation, digital ergonomics, information architecture, way finding, semiotics, symbolism and electronic publishing will be explored through a series of increasingly difficult and technologically demanding exercises leading toward a longer and more in-depth final project.

Prerequisites: GRAPH-202 or ARCH-202 and admission to the Interactive Design and Media program or permission of the Interactive Design and Media program director


DIGD-302 (Formerly D512) 0-10-5

Interactive Design II

This studio introduces students to a variety of media used in interactive design including motion topography for the screen, kinectic type, graphic motion and online video development. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts and strategies needed to integrate this with interactivity. Issues of navigation, information architecture and electronic publishing will be covered. This studio course will include a series of progressively more difficult and technically complex projects leading toward a longer and more in-depth final project.

Prerequisite: DIGD-301


DIGD-305 (Formerly D704) 3-0-3

Theory of Electronic Communication Seminar I

(writing intensive)

This seminar course provides students with a theoretical understanding of the role of the digital designer within the constantly evolving electronic marketplace. Issues of e-commerce, digital communication, electronic ethics and professional practice will be discussed. Special focus will be placed on how our existing culture has been, and is currently being, revolutionized by the information explosion.

Prerequisite: Admission into Interactive Design and Media program


DIGD-307 (Formerly D625) 1-5-3

Advanced Web Design and Strategy

This course exposes students to conceptual and technical aspects of Web design. Information architecture, semiotics, storyboarding and site management are taught; in addition to learning technical skills in Web production software and HTML. Additional areas of focus include typography, color theory, composition and motion graphics for the Web. The final project requires the publication of a website that pushes the boundaries of traditional interactive media.

Prerequisite: DIGD-206 or GRAPH 310 or ANIM-202


DIGD-312 (Formerly D628) 1-5-3

Multimedia Design

This course exposes students to the conceptual and technical aspects of designing and creating interactive multimedia experiences. In addition to learning technical skills in multimedia authoring software, students will be encouraged to develop innovative forms of electronic content made possible by CD-ROM media. The final project of the students’ choosing will demonstrate their ability to create and develop interactive media in a cross-platform environment.

Prerequisite: DIGD-206 or ANIM-202 or approved equivalent


DIGD-401 (Formerly D711) 0-10-5

Interactive Design III

This studio will explore the translation of three- and four-dimensional concepts of space into two-dimensional screen images, interactivity and animation. Students will be introduced to the theory and practices used in integrating 3D modeling/rendering, motion graphic production and web into a rich interactive environment. The mediums of choreography, filmmaking, architecture, performance art and music will be discussed as potential sources of inspiration for creating innovative digital spaces and experiences. A series of increasingly complex projects will culminate in a more demanding final project.

Prerequisite: DIGD-302


DIGD-403 (Formerly D714) 3-0-3

Web Development

This course will explore the Web markup languages, HTML, CSS and Java Script, required for advanced control of Web design. Students will be introduced to these languages through lectures, demonstrations and practical exercises. The focus will be on writing, testing and de-bugging the code and its appropriate application. A series of increasingly complex exercises will gradually build the student’s knowledge and understanding of these languages.

Prerequisite: DIGD-301 or DIGD-307


DIGD-405 (Formerly D629) 1-5-3

Digital Video Design and Production

This course exposes students to the principles of digital-video design and production. Students will become versed in non-linear, video-editing software as a means to create effective digital-video presentations. A series of projects develop essential skill sets such as storyboarding, video capture, editing and compositing. A final, student-defined project will demonstrate mastery of the conceptual and technical aspects of digital-video design and production.

Prerequisite: DIGD-206 or ANIM-202 or approved equivalent


DIGD-406 (Formerly D715) 3-0-3

Actionscript 3.0

This course will explore the multimedia scripting languages ActionScript and Lingo, required for advanced control of multimedia. Students will be introduced to these languages through lectures, demonstrations and practical exercises. The focus will be on writing, testing and de-bugging the code and its appropriate application. A series of increasingly complex exercises will gradually build the student’s knowledge and understanding of these languages.

Prerequisite: DIGD-301


DIGD-415 (Formerly D630) 1-5-3

3D Modeling

This course exposes students to the conceptual and technical aspects of three-dimensional modeling and virtual environments. Students will complete a series of specifically designed exercises of increasing difficulty leading to a final project of the student’s choosing. The class will cover the basic principles of 3D modeling and animation including polygonal and NURB modeling, texturing, lighting and animation.

Prerequisite: DIGD-206 or approved equivalent


DIGD-498 (Formerly D810) 3-0-3

Interdisciplinary Capstone Project Preparation

(writing intensive)

This course requires students to identify and analyze potential capstone projects through a number of lenses including technical feasibility, marketability and design potential. With faculty guidance, students will form interdisciplinary teams that reflect the specific requirements of the chosen capstone project. To complete this course, a project proposal must be submitted documenting the factors that will allow the development of a successful capstone project. Research and presentation skills are a major focus of this course.

Prerequisites: DIGD-302


DIGD-499 (Formerly D712) 0-10-5

Interactive Design IV Interdisciplinary Capstone Project

This capstone studio will develop the ability of the interactive designer to successfully participate on an interdisciplinary team. Students from a variety of majors, already organized in the capstone preparation course, will collaborate to develop a final, working prototype of a product, service, experience or publication of their choice that synthesizes their knowledge and skills from the previous semesters. The students will develop a project that demonstrates innovation, marketability and relevance within the larger community.

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in DIGD-401 and DIGD-498


DIY-1011-0-1

University Discovery

The University Discovery course supports first year students transitioning to college by introducing academic and interpersonal skills necessary to become engaged learners at Philadelphia University. Through classes, individual meetings, and personal reflections, students will discover how they learn and develop strategies for academic success, career exploration, and campus engagement. Topics discussed include career planning, study strategies, time management, and campus resources. Undeclared first year students are required to take DIY101.  


DRAW-101 (Formerly T712)1-5-3

Drawing I

Basic drawing experience to develop the understanding of form as applied to two- and three-dimensional space. The student works from nature, still life and the human figure in a variety of media; exploring qualities of line, texture, light and space representation. Students begin to explore subjects and develop ideas with application to the design majors.


DRAW-201 (Formerly T713) 1-5-3

Drawing II for Graphic Design

Advanced drawing experiences continue the study of form and structure begun in Drawing I. In addition, students are encouraged to develop individual expression in a variety of graphic media. Drawing as a means of developing graphic ideas is stressed.

Prerequisite: DRAW-101


DRAW-206 (Formerly T714) 1-5-3

Drawing II: Figure Drawing

In this course, students acquire special knowledge of the human figure and anatomy. A variety of media and methods of graphic representation are explored. Perceptual skills, as well as cognitive aspects of drawing the human form, will be studied. Live models, both clothed and nude, charts, skeleton model and the self will be used as sources for study. Required for Fashion Design majors.

Prerequisite: DRAW-101


DRAW-301 (Formerly I633) 1-5-3

Drawing: Design and Development

This is an advanced drawing course developed for designers of all disciplines who want to improve the designer’s ability to apply knowledge imparted in other courses to the development of designs. Wherever possible the subject matter of the students’ design studio courses will be used as the subject matter for drawing exercises.

Prerequisite: VSDRW-101 and INDD-102


DRAW-303 1-5-3

Advanced Drawing: Materials and Techniques

Advanced Drawing: Materials and Techniques is designed to further develop the design student’s drawing abilities and creative thought process, while encouraging conceptual development and a deeper understanding of contemporary issues in art and design. This course will provide an in-depth exploration of line, color and materials using a variety of drawing tools, while introducing a more conceptual approach to drawing. Students will participate in off-campus trips to galleries and museums.

Prerequisite: DRAW-101


DSGN-3713-0-3) or (1-5-3)

Special Topics in Design

An upper-level course designed to take advantage of resident/adjunct/visiting faculty members’ expertise or a special focus wanted by the School for one or two terms. These courses might provide an in-depth treatment of recent advances in subjects of current interest in a given field whose subject matter is not necessarily needed to be offered long term. A specific “topic” may be delivered a maximum of two terms.

**If you are repeating this special topics course and you want only the most recent grade to count in your GPA and not the previous grade you must notify the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: Announced prior to registration


DSGNFND-103 (Formerly T701)1-5-3

Design Foundations I

This foundation design course explores the basic elements and principles of 2D and 3D form and their application in the design process. Line, shape, mass, space, texture and gray value are introduced as fundamental and interrelated components necessary in structuring solutions to problems in design. Projects are introduced that encourage students to express ideas in a visual/tactile context, while exploring the interaction of ideas and materials.


DSGNFND-203 (Formerly T702)1-5-3

Design Foundations II

Color is introduced in this foundation design course with an emphasis placed on its practical application in the design process. Projects done by students, using a variety of media, will explore the interaction of color in design with formal, biophysical and psychological implications and goals.

Prerequisite: DSGNFND-103


DSGNFND-303 (Formerly T704)1-5-3

Design Foundations III

In-depth studies emphasizing the use of color and varied media in both 2D and 3D forms are undertaken in this foundation course. The interrelationship of the elements and principles of design are addressed through solving a variety of visual problems. Processes of abstraction are explored in projects using a wide variety of media. Students will be expected to develop their abilities for critical analysis of their own work, as well as design processes and products in general.

Prerequisite: DSGNFND-203


DSGNFND-423 (Formerly T729)2-2-3

Design Concepts

Students are introduced to basic design theory as it relates to apparel design and merchandising including hands-on exercises in color, composition, presentation and critique skills. Trend forecasting and brand analysis provides an overview of the product development process. May not be taken by fashion design majors.

Prerequisite: FASHMGT-101


ECBIO-101 (Formerly S430)3-0-3

Environmental Issues

In this course, students will explore the ecological, chemical, social, economic and political implications of critical global environmental issues including water pollution, pesticides, energy, acid rain, global warming, waste management, biodiversity loss and population growth. Alternative solutions proposed to address these experimental issues will be explored from multiple perspectives.

Prerequisite: Science I (SCI-101, BIOL-101, BIOL-103, CHEM-101, PHYS-101)


ECBIO-201 (Formerly S238) 3-0-3

Biodiversity

The purpose of this course is to explore what is known about the abundance and distribution of all species on earth, what threatens and supports these species and what efforts humans have taken both in the United States and globally to destroy and conserve biodiversity. Genetic variability, demographic and population dynamics, environmental variation, economic value and legal status will be compared for the design of captive breeding programs, protected areas management and sustainable use alternatives.

Prerequisite: Science II (completion of any two of the following courses: SCI-101, SCI-102, BIOL-101, BIOL-103, CHEM-101, CHEM-103, PHYS-101, PHYS-201)


ECBIO-301 (Formerly S233) 3-3-4

Ecology

This course quantitatively measures the relationship between organisms and their environment at the population, community, landscape and global level. Critical ecological controversies will be explored. Field data for both flora and fauna will be collected, analyzed and presented following guidelines from professional scientific journals.

Prerequisite: grade of C- (1.67) or better in BIOL104 and BIOL 104L or grade of C- (1.67) or better in ECBIO 208


ECBIO-302 (Formerly S234) 3-3-4

Experimental Field Ecology

This course focuses on the historical, legal, ethical, economic and scientific foundation of the emerging field of conservation biology. Genetic, ecological and population analytical methods will be applied to case studies of conservation programs from around the world with an emphasis on research design critiques. Experimental design and statistics for field problems will be covered in depth. Students will design, implement, analyze and present their findings from an ecological field experiment.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in ECBIO-301 and co-requisite STAT-301


ECBIO-303 2-3-4

Public Health Issues

Public Health Issues: Are Americans healthy? This upper-level science elective course examines the scientific, psychological and policy dynamics associated with public health. Students will design experiments to measure their own health in a series of hands-on interactive laboratory exercises while comparing their results to national level demographic, epidemiological, historical trends and current intervention alternatives for the nation’s leading health issues. Client case studies will be used to engage students in problem-solving scientifically sound interventions that examine the environmental, socio-cultural, behavioral, and biological determinants of health.

Prerequisites: grade of C-: (1.67) or better in BIOL 104 and BIOL 104L


ECBIO-316 (Formerly S465) 3-3-4

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

This course is an international overview of current strategies used for wildlife conservation of mammals, birds, fish and other vertebrate species. Population ecology, habitat, disease, foraging and behavior will be covered in depth. Students will research the historical, legal and economic foundation for current best-management practices. Through intensive field studies, students will compare and contrast scientific-field techniques used in wildlife management.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in ECBIO-301


ECBIO-318 (Formerly S468) 3-0-3

Urban Ecology, Restoration & Planning

Natural lands and natural systems occur in densely populated areas and because of the human impacts present vast challenges to the landscape architects and environmental planners who are entrusted with their protection and enhancement. This course studies in detail urban ecological systems and the human impacts that shape them. The student will also be exposed to current restoration techniques, which are being utilized in the urban setting to restore natural ecological functioning to the city.

Prerequisites: SCI-101, or grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L, or permission of instructor


ECBIO-319 (Formerly S454) 3-0-3

Oceanography

An introduction to the biological, chemical, geological and physical aspects of the ocean environment with particular emphasis on the importance of the oceans to human beings and the impact we have on them. Students may participate in an optional field trip highlighting estuarine/coastal biodiversity, aquacultural techniques and oceanographic sampling techniques.

Prerequisite: SCI II which is completion of any two of the following courses: SCI-101, SCI-102, BIOL-101, BIOL-103, CHEM-101, CHEM-103, PHYS-101 or PHYS-201


ECBIO-391 (Formerly S491) 0-9-3

Research I in Environmental Science

Independent research is taken under the guidance of a faculty member. The research will include a written proposal prior to initiation of the project, a literature search, experimental fieldwork, a written abstract and report at the end of the semester and an oral presentation of the work. Guidelines for approval and for final evaluation are available in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts office.

Prerequisite: permission of the academic associate dean of undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts..


ECBIO-392 (Formerly S492) 0-9-3

Research II in Environmental Science

Continuation of ECBIO-391.

Prerequisites: ECBIO-391, permission of the academic associate dean for undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.


ECBIO-415 (Formerly S455) 3-0-3

Natural Resource Management

(writing intensive)

This course explores the existing state of the world’s natural resources including forests, fisheries, rangeland, soil, water, wildlife, air and energy. Management options for each resource will be explored in depth. Field trips will compare cost, impact and implementation of different approaches used by environmental agencies. Students will write and present a resource-management plan for a key issue.


Prerequisite: ECBIO-301


ECON-205 (Formerly E821)3-0-3

Macroeconomics

Introduction to the overall functioning of an economic system with a view toward understanding the factors underlying income, employment and prices on the aggregate level. Topics include monetary and fiscal policy with primary emphasis on the impact of international trade and policy implications.


ECON-206 (Formerly E822)3-0-3

Microeconomics

Introduction to the principles underlying the behavior of business firms, resource owners and consumers within a system of markets. Introduces the theory of value and distribution and the implications of international trade on autarchy value and distribution.


ECON-381 (Formerly E899)0-0-3

Independent Study in Economics

Intensive independent study of a chosen subject. The student is expected to read a substantial number of major works in the field and to prepare a critical, documented paper. See the statement on Independent Study under ““University Academic Policies and Procedures: Common Academic Policies for All Students.”

Prerequisites: permission required. See appropriate form available online at University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


ECON-401 (Formerly E864)3-0-3

International Economics

The theoretical basis for international trade is examined, as well as the economic impact of such trade on participating nations.


ENGR-101 3-2-3

Introduction to Engineering

This course is an introduction to engineering through hands on use of design, build and test modules in mechanical, industrial and architectural fields. The course helps the students to relate basic sciences to engineering applications. The course makes an introduction to programming logic, engineering design, materials, workshop skills, engineering ethics and technical presentation. Visits to engineering industries and professional society meetings will be arranged.

Prerequisites: None


ENGR-102 2-2-3

Engineering Drawing

This course introduces students to engineering drawing, descriptive geometry, design and problem solving. Engineering drawing is a graphic language that can convey, with exactness and detail, ideas from the design engineer to the fabricator. Thus, the emphasis of the course is on communicating design ideas through engineering drawings.

Prerequisites: MATH-102 or MATH-111


ENGR-104 3-0-3

Introduction to Computing

An introductory course which provides a coherent and comprehensive treatment of fundamental concepts of computer science. It describes how computing systems work and how they are applied to solve real-world problems. The main emphasis is on the design of algorithms and procedural abstraction, high-level, language-programming projects.


ENGR-210 3-0-3

Introduction to Materials Science

Atomic theory and molecular bonding of solids, polymer structure and mechanics of materials for textiles are taught at an introductory level. Specific processing issues including additives, viscosity, transitions and morphology are studied as well.

Prerequisites: MATH-111, CHEM 103 and CHEM 103L


ENGR-215 3-0-3

Engineering Statics

Engineering statics describes the mechanical behavior of materials and systems in equilibrium using Newton’s laws of motion. In this course, students will learn the principles of force equilibrium, how to construct free-body diagrams, understanding distributed forces, friction and introductory structural response.

Prerequisites: PHYS-201 and PHYS 201L, MATH-213 (pre- or co-requisite)


ENGR-217 (also listed as MIS-302) 3-0-3

Information Systems Design

Analysis and design of computer-based information systems. Definition of databases, measures of effectiveness, management-staff interfaces. Focus on analyzing the situation and its particular needs before attempting a solution. Case studies from engineering, manufacturing and service environments used to create discussions. (ISE majors can take this course in the School of Business Administration as MIS-302)

Prerequisites: MATH-112


ENGR-218 3-0-3

Engineering Dynamics

Engineering dynamics describes the motions of particles and rigid bodies and the forces that accompany or cause those motions. Basic methods include Newton’s laws, the work and energy principle, and the impulse and momentum principle.

Prerequisites: ENGR-215, MATH-225 (pre- or co-requisite)


ENGR-301 3-0-3

Mechanics of Materials

This course focuses on internal forces; stress, strain and their relations; stresses and deformations in axially loaded members; stresses and deformations in torsionally loaded members; stresses and deformations in flexural members; combined stresses; column analysis; statically indeterminate members; and an introduction to member design.

Prerequisite: ENGR-215


ENGR-302 3-0-3

Design for Manufacturability

This course focuses on the design process; interaction of materials, processes and design; economic considerations; design considerations for machining, casting, forging, extrusion, forming, powder metallurgy; designing with plastics; design for assembly; and projects and case studies.

Prerequisite: ENGR-102


ENGR-303 3-0-3

Engineering Economics

This course is designed to provide the engineering student with the decision-making skills necessary to evaluate the monetary consequences of the products, processes and projects that engineers design. Decisions must balance economics, performance, aesthetics and resources. As the capital outlays may be significant and affect the productive potential of a firm over the long term, it is important to understand the time value of money. The course emphasizes calculations of present values, future worth, internal rates of return and replacement analysis. In addition to the specific financial concepts covered, the student will construct computer spreadsheets to do sensitivity analysis and generate graphs to enhance presentation skills.

Prerequisite: ENGR-305


ENGR-304 3-0-3

Operations Research I

This course addresses the philosophy and techniques of operations research. Emphasis is placed on elementary model building and concepts of optimization; structure of problem solving; linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms; game theory; network analysis, branch and bound theory.

Prerequisite: MATH-112, ENGR-305


ENGR-305 3-0-3

Engineering Statistics I

This course addresses the fundamentals of probability and distribution theory with application to various branches of engineering; basic probability theory, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, independent random variables, covariance and correlation and linear combinations of random variables. Statistical decision theory including significance testing and estimation, confidence intervals, design and perform tests of hypotheses on population means, standard deviations and proportions.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in MATH-112


ENGR-307 3-0-3

Engineering Statistics II

This course is a continuation of EN505 Engineering Statistics, and it is required for the BSISE and the BSE with minor in ISE. It focuses on the application of statistical techniques to industrial problems; relationships between experimental measurements using regression and correlation theory and analysis of variance models; design of experiments with one and more than one levels; emphasis on inherent variability of production processes; control chart techniques and the use of exponential and Weibull models in reliability analysis; and statistical process control.

Prerequisite: ENGR-305


ENGR-308 3-2-3

Integrated Engineering Product Development I

The IEPD two-course sequence combines the perspectives of design, engineering and marketing in the product development process in a hands-on, collaborative environment. Throughout the course students will be working in groups to design, develop, prototype and analyze economic and marketing aspects of engineered products. Students will be prepared to use modern engineering tools including rapid prototyping, CNC machine tools, CAD-based product lifecycle analysis and management, costing and market data analysis.

Prerequisite: MATH-112, ENGR-104 and ENGR-102


ENGR-309 3-2-3

Integrated Engineering Product Development II

In the second semester of the IEPD course students will be primarily working on their group projects. Opportunities to work on industry sponsored projects or internally developed projects of current interest will be provided. Periodically students will present their progress on the project in discussion forums. The use of engineering drawings, charts and graphs, simulations and media will be encouraged and evaluated. Industry veterans will provide guest lectures in manufacturing practices, standards, regulations, ethics and management. Through a series of guest lectures, students will also develop an appreciation for patents and intellectual property.

Prerequisite: ENGR-308


ENGR-311 3-0-3

Fluid Mechanics

This course explores the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, including such topics as fluid statics, control-volume analysis, the Navier-Stokes equations, similitude, viscous, inviscous and turbulent flows and boundary layers.

Prerequisite: ENGR-218, PHYS-203 and PHYS-203L


ENGR-314 3-0-3

Numerical Methods for Engineers

Numerical methods are used to solve mathematical problems that are often impossible to solve analytically. Numerical methods enable formulating engineering problems so that they can be solved by arithmetic operations. Problems with large systems of equations, nonlinearities and complicated geometries that are encountered in engineering can be solved by the use of numerical methods and programming using computers. The emphasis of this course is the use of personal computers to solve mathematical problems.

Prerequisite: MATH-225 and ENGR-104


ENGR-316 2-2-3

Introduction and Materials for Composites

An overall introduction to composites will be presented including their mechanical properties and advantages. Fiber reinforcements will include pre-pregs and textile composites. Composites design and various molding techniques will be covered. The laboratory will have various manufacturing and experimental exercises.


ENGR 317 2-4-3

Composites Manufacturing

This course will be a laboratory intensive course that will include material selection and tooling types. Materials will include pre-pregs and woven and braided performs. Key issues in tool design, bond assembly jigs and secondary tooling, hand layup, tape layup and fiber placement, bag molding and autoclaving, compression molding, pultrusion, RTM, VaRTM, mechanical property tests, manufacturing defects and quality control will be covered. Prerequisite: ENGR 316 Introduction to Composites. First offered Spring 2013

Prerequisite: ENGR-215


ENGR-322 3-0-3

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering I

This course explores the analysis of circuits; transient and steady state phenomena; and general analysis techniques; and the fundamentals of direct and alternating circuits, transformers rotating machinery, electrical and electronic control, and electrical energy.

Prerequisite: PHYS-203 and PHYS-203L


ENGR-371 (3-0-3) or (1-5-3)

Special Topics in Engineering

An upper-level course designed to take advantage of resident/adjunct/visiting faculty members’ expertise or a special focus wanted by the School for one or two terms. These courses might provide an in-depth treatment of recent advances in subjects of current interest in a given field whose subject matter is not necessarily needed to be offered long term. A specific “topic” may be delivered a maximum of two terms.

Prerequisites: Announced prior to registration


ENGR-381, ENGR-382 0-0-3

Independent Study in Engineering I and II

For details, see description of Independent Study in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section. For engineering students only.

Permission required. Also see appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


ENGR 404 3-0-3

Composites Design Analysis

The factors which govern analytical composite design will be discussed. Two dimensional stress strain relationships along the planar axes of the composites, orthotropic material constitutive relationships will be investigated. The course includes instruction in finite element analysis for composites including complex structures which include core materials. The various accepted failure criteria including maximum stress, Tsai-Hill, and Tsai-Wu criterion will be compared. A procedure for laminate strength analysis and failure envelopes will be introduced.

Prerequisites: ENGR-301 Mechanics of Materials, ENGR 316 Introduction and Materials for Composites, and ENGR 317 Composites Manufacturing


ENGR-406 3-0-3

Composite Structures for Industrial and Consumer Applications

Analysis of composites for use in automotive, aerospace, sporting goods, alternative energy and other mechanical structures will be addressed. The focus will be on system design, structure design and engineering economics associated with actual composite structures and systems.

Prerequisites: ENGR-303 Engineering Economics, ENGR 316 Introduction and Materials for Composites, ENGR 4xx Composites Design Analysis (N.B.: This was amended since the Registrar cannot accommodate both prerequisite and co-requisite for Composite Design Analysis.)


ENGR-498 2-2-3

Senior Design Project I

This course exposes the students to a series of real-world industry problems that require applications of Industrial Engineering principles. A preliminary analysis of various selected problems will be performed collectively. The students will then form a team and select their senior design project. The course also covers (through invited speakers) topics related to the engineering profession such as ethics, intellectual property, project management and social responsibility. Students will present a written and oral proposal of their senior design project preparation.

Prerequisite IENGR-315, at least 86 credits, and WRTG-21X


ENGR-499 1-5-4

Senior Design Project II: Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Industrial Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

(writing intensive)

Students in this course will apply engineering principles to solve a real-world problem. Student works as member of a team assigned to a problem in a manufacturing, processing, service or government organization. The capstone senior design project will consist of a project that builds on engineering, business, ethics and social issues. This course requires a professional written and oral report and will serve as the program’s major writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 90 credits, senior level and WRTG-21X (This capstone course is major specific); ENGR-498 ISE only.


FASHDES-211 (Formerly T918)1-5-3

Garment Structures

This is the initial course in the fashion design technical studio sequence. This course focuses on the study and production of apparel construction methods. Students have the opportunity to produce garments and design them through the imaginative use of construction details. A sample book of various industrial construction methods is developed.

Note: A minimum grade of “C” will be required in order to continue in the design studio sequence. Admission into the Fashion Design Program. Fashion Industry majors need approval from FMM program director.


FASHDES-213 (Formerly T920) 1-5-3

Pattern Development I

This course covers the fundamentals of the flat-pattern method. Students will draft bodice, sleeve and skirt blocks to be used in creating various styles. Some patterns are cut and sewn in muslin to test fit and further enhance sewing skills. A sample book of flat-pattern techniques will be produced. In addition, two ensembles will be designed and produced.

Prerequisites: a grade of “C” or better in FASHDES-211. Admission to the Fashion Design Program. Fashion Merchandising and Management majors need approval from FMM program director.


FASHDES-250 (Formerly T940) 0-0-3

Fashion Studies Abroad

A “short course” that enables students to study various aspects of fashion design, production and merchandising in a major region of the world. Through a series of lectures, guided tours and visits to couture and ready-to-wear establishments, design studios, retailers, production plants and museums, students have the opportunity to experience a segment of the global fashion industry. Students carry a journal and write about their own experiences abroad. A visual record of design inspirations is required as part of the research assignments. Oral and written reports, including visuals, explore the design and business practices of apparel firms. Students also experience cooperative design and merchandising as a result of team assignments.

Prerequisites: student must have a 2.5 G.P.A. and major in Fashion Design, Fashion Merchandising and Management or Textile Design program. Student status will be determined by the program offered.


FASHDES-252 2-2-3

Fashion Design Research

This required course focuses on methods of research and development of original concepts in the fashion design field. Visual sensitivity to the environment as a source for building observational skills, design literacy, visual documentation, and concept development skills will be addressed. Visits to design resources such as museums, architectural sites, analysis of trend forecasts and current influences will provide inspiration for development of a journal for application in future courses.

Prerequisites: DRAW-206, VSDES-101 or DSGNFND-103, and DSGNFND-203


FASHDES-300 2-4-3

Technical Design

This course will enable the student through hands on experience to understand the basic requirements needed to be successful in the area of technical design. Building on their knowledge of pattern, construction and design, students will learn to create technical specifications packages used for product data management. Students will further acquire an advanced understanding of terminology and technical vocabulary needed to communicate with manufacturing facilities throughout the world. Students will learn the process of developing garment specifications, conducting fittings and successful communication for quality assurance issues to vendors and manufacturing personnel worldwide.

Prerequisites: CAD-204, a grade of “C” or better in FASHDES-311.


FASHDES-311 (Formerly T921) 1-5-3

Pattern Development II

Students learn to drape basic bodice and skirt variations on standard industrial dress forms. Original garments are designed, draped and sewn using industrial machinery. Accurate patternmaking, sewing and attention to design fundamentals are stressed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: a grade of “C” or better in FASHDES-213. Admission into the Fashion Design Program. Fashion Merchandising and Management majors need approval from FMM program director.


FASHDES-316 (Formerly T720) 2-4-3

Fashion Design

This course focuses on the key components of the fashion design process including research, trend forecasting, materials investigation and presentation of valuable, market-specific collections. Designers consider current market trends and design concepts as influences on merchandising. Extensive opportunities for the development and communication of a personal design vision in illustrated presentations helps students build portfolio-ready collections. Industry directed projects also provide opportunities to develop brand-conscious yet creative concepts and designs. CAD skills are utilized in a variety of presentational techniques.

Prerequisites: CAD-204, FASHDES-252, FASHDRW-207


FASHDES-317 1-5-3

Hand Knitting for Fashion Design

This elective course is offered to expand construction skills and design possibilities. By hand knitting and/or crocheting, students will design and produce marketable garments to augment other collections or as individual pieces.

Prerequisites: FASHDES-311 Draping Design and Construction; TEXT-101 Survey of the Textile Industry


FASHDES-322 (Formerly T291) 2-2-3

Fashion Design Problem Solving

This course focuses on experimental design and is a continuation of the design foundation sequence for Fashion Design majors. Students are provided the opportunity to think creatively, to develop alternate approaches in problem solving and to select optimum solutions on a cost/aesthetic/materials basis. Through materials investigation, this course promotes the use of creative answers to the basic design problem of covering the body.

Prerequisites: FASHDES-252, FASHDRW-207, FASHDES-311


FASHDES-335 (Formerly T923) 1-5-3

Pattern Development III

Students will manipulate basic blocks to develop original designs for various markets. Emphasis will be placed on industry standards as they apply to fit and proper construction techniques. One original design will include using a two-way stretch fabric.

Prerequisites: “C” or better in FASHDES-311. Admission into the Fashion Design program. Fashion Merchandising and Management majors need approval from FMM program director.


FASDES-336 1-5-3

Costume Design: Film and Stage

A studio course that offers fashion designers an opportunity to learn the basic process of costume design through the research, development and construction of an original costume design. Character and script analysis will be covered in addition to working effectively with directors and other collaborators. This course explores researching period costumes and uses appropriate construction techniques while considering comfort and durability for a modern theatre or film production.

Prerequisite: FASHDES-311, FASHDRW-207, ARTH-314


FASHDES-337 (Formerly T922) 1-5-3

Tailoring

Students are introduced to tailoring techniques. Patterns for a tailored garment are drafted according to the industry’s standards. Construction of garments on industrial machinery uses current production technology.

Prerequisite: FASHDES-311


FASHDES-371 (Formerly T939) 1-5-3

Special Topics in Fashion

A topic of special interest to fashion students and faculty will be explored in a studio/lecture format. Topic will vary, to be chosen by the instructor.

Prerequisite: will be determined by the subject of the course offered


FASHDES-415 (Formerly T925) 1-7-4

Collection Development I

This is a capstone course for senior fashion designers to develop and produce a portfolio of original designs. The collection is designed, merchandised and produced by the student in collaboration with the instructor and a visiting critic.

Prerequisites: FASHDES-322, FASHDES-316, grade of “C” or better in FASHDES-311 and FASHDES-335. Admission into the Fashion Design Program. Fashion Merchandising and Management majors need approval from FMM program director.


FASHDES-416 (Formerly T926) 1-7-4

Collection Development II

Students will further develop the concepts from their original sources of inspiration from FASHDES-415, Collection Development I, creating a cohesive collection of clothing. This is also an opportunity for the student who wishes to investigate designing for a different market from a new inspirational source.

Prerequisite: a grade of “C” or better in FASHDES-335 and FASHDES-415


FASHDES-419 (Formerly T725) 1-5-3

Accessories

The area of accessories presents excellent opportunities for the creative designer. The accessories market (hats, scarves, belts, handbags and jewelry) is growing and is in need of creative and qualified talent. “Accessories” is an elective for the student interested in pursuing a career in this market and/or for the student who, as a designer, is interested in the creation and coordination of the total ensemble.

Prerequisites: FASHDES-252, FASHDES-211


FASHDES-433 (Formerly T722) 1-5-3

Fashion Layout and Portfolio Development

This elective course provides fashion design students with a professional portfolio of original work showcasing their design abilities and illustration finesse. The concept of layout and design will be presented as it relates to newspaper advertisements, editorial illustration and brochure development. Various presentational techniques will also be addressed as an effective sales tool for seasonal collections.

Prerequisite: FASHDRW-207


FASHDES-441 (Formerly T924) 1-5-3

Couture Techniques

This elective teaches the various methods of creating and constructing a couture garment. Students will learn how to combine custom designing, patternmaking methods, machine and hand skills to execute an ensemble of clothing in the style of selected couture designers.

Prerequisites: FASHDRW-207, FASHDES-311


FASHDRW-207 (Formerly T715)1-5-3

Fashion/Figure Drawing

Students review basic forms of the figure in an anatomical, gestural and design sense. In a studio setting, students develop the skills and vocabulary of design room and presentation sketching by drawing from live models, developing designer croquis and technical drawings, exploring various media and rendering fabrics.

Prerequisite: DRAW-206


FASHDRW-317 (Formerly T716)1-5-3

Fashion Illustration I

This course enhances drawing skills for fashion design students who are interested in further developing their illustrations and applications in the field of fashion design. Students do extensive fashion model studies and develop several visual presentations related to concepts and techniques presented in class. Presentation techniques and portfolio presentation will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: FASHDRW-207


FASHDRW-319 (Formerly T721)1-5-3

Fashion Illustration II

This sequel to FASHDRW-317 is designed to challenge and refine the fashion design student’s illustration skills as they relate to the professional job market. Extensive fashion-model studies will be combined with assignments similar to those found in today’s industry. Professional presentation skills and portfolio development will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: FASHDRW-317


FASHMGT-101 (Formerly T901)3-1-3

Global Fashion Insight

Survey of the apparel industry presents a comprehensive overview of one of the most dynamic industries in the world including marketing strategies, product-line development, pre-production and production processes, quality assurance, international sourcing, supply chain management and distribution strategies. This course investigates the application of technology in all areas of the operations of an apparel enterprise. Survey establishes the basis for further study of the apparel industry. The term project, which simulates the formation and operation of an apparel enterprise, provides a theoretical as well as a practical learning experience.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101


FASHMGT-201 (Formerly T917) 1-5-3

Prototyping

Students will have a basic understanding of garment construction combined with flat-pattern concepts. The use of industrial equipment and basic slopers will be utilized to produce a sample book of construction details and garments. Students will also create a pattern and construct a non-apparel item (ex. handbag).

Any student who has received credit for FASHDES-211 or FASHDES-213 may not take this course.


FASHMGT-305N (Formerly FASHMGT-305, T904) 3-2-3

Production

Basic operations in all segments of an apparel plant are studied from the initial receipt of raw materials through storage, inspection, marker making, spreading, cutting, sewing, pressing, warehousing, shipping and customer returns. Latest technological advances in each of these areas will be discussed with marker making performed on a Gerber Accumark 300 System. Inventory management, labor issues, ergonomics and relevant public policies are also studied.

Prerequisites: FASHMGT-101, FASHMGT-201 or FASHDES-211


FASHMGT-308 3-0-3

Global Product Management

Global Product Management is a combination of classroom lectures and experiential instruction in a global environment. Students’ tour design houses, mills, dye houses and production facilities, and examine international retailers. Students learn how to assess manufacturers for compliance and engage in cultural activities. Another major component of the course is to observe the economic state of the apparel industry in the specified country and study sustainable methods for manufacturing apparel, home textiles and other products.

Prerequisite: TEXT 101 Survey of Textiles or with the necessary approval from a Program Director


FASHMGT-401 (Formerly T916) 3-0-3

Apparel/Textile Quality Assurance

This course will develop an understanding of the intricate interdependence of fiber content, yarn properties, fabric structure and the applied finish required to produce saleable products offered at a “fair” value per dollar expenditure. Apparel Quality Assurance integrates the knowledge gained in textile, apparel, business and humanities courses to develop managerial talent in any “cut and sew” aspect of the fashion industry.

Fall only.

Prerequisites: TEXT-301, FASHMGT-305 and STAT-201


FASHMGT-408 (Formerly T912) 3-0-3

Apparel/Textile Sourcing

(writing intensive)

Execution and delivery of a product in today’s apparel supply chain occurs within a global environment. Understanding the complexities in establishing and maintaining sourcing strategies is a critical element in a student’s portfolio of course work.

Prerequisite: FASHMGT-101 or FASHDES-316


FASHMGT-437 (Formerly TEXT 437) 3-0-3

Integrated Technology

The course will analyze the various manufacturing technologies and their implications on management philosophy, employee relations and profitability through lectures and literature searches. The student will be a member of a team that will analyze and present to top management a feasible plan for integrating manufacturing technology.

Prerequisites: FASHMGT-305


FASHMGT-451 (Formerly T197) 3-0-3

Operations and Supply Chain Management

This course provides a comprehensive survey of production and service operations management with an emphasis on the fashion/retail industry supply chain. It focuses on mathematical methods and the case study approach to formulate, analyze and solve various supply chain problems. Areas of study include decision analysis, forecasting techniques, inventory and scheduling models, statistical quality control, aggregate planning, material requirements planning, linear programming, transportation and transshipment problems. Excel will be used extensively in this course.

Prerequisites: MGMT104, DECPROC101, DECFRM 200, MATH 103 or MATH 111; pre-or co-requisite STAT 202 or MATH 111.


FASHMGT-499 (Formerly T909) 3-0-3

Apparel Merchandising Management

(writing intensive)

Management of the merchandising function in an apparel company, including the development of a product line, design coordination, costing, sample making, specifications, resource selection, forecasting sales and planning inventory levels, promotion and coordination with sales and production are included.

Prerequisite: WRTG-21X, FASHMGT-101 or FASHDES-316 and completion of 90 credits with at least 21 credits in either the Apparel or Fashion core courses, or permission of the instructor


FINC-301 (Formerly B642)3-0-3

Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to finance that examines the role of the financial decision maker at the corporate level. Four basic questions are examined: the goal of the firm, investment decisions of the firm, financing decisions of the firm and dividend decisions of the firm. The technique of discounted cash-flow analysis is developed and emphasized as it relates to corporate financial decisions.

Prerequisites: ACCT-101 and STAT-201


FINC-303 (Formerly B643) 3-0-3

Intermediate Financial Management

An in-depth study of financial analysis and planning, asset management and capital structures. Financial decision making is studied by means of finance cases. Computerized financial analyses are part of the course.

Prerequisites: FINC-301


FINC-318 (Formerly B645) 3-0-3

International Finance and Development

This is an advanced course that explores the interrelations between the economic theory of growth/development and financial applications in the emerging countries.

Prerequisites: FINC-301, ECON-205, or ECON-206


FINC-321 (Formerly B661) 3-0-3

Investments and Portfolio Management

This course explores the process of comparative security valuation analysis. The emphasis is on risk-return trade-off, principles of portfolio management and the process of security analysis.

Prerequisite: FINC-301


FINC-322 (Formerly B641) 3-0-3

Capital Markets and Financial Institutions

This course explores depository and non-depository financial intermediaries, flow of funds into the money and capital markets.

Prerequisite: FINC-301


FINC-381 (Formerly B699) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Finance

This course is an intensive independent study of a chosen subject. The student is expected to read a substantial number of major works in the field, may be required to do primary research and must prepare a critical documented paper.

See statement on Independent Study in the “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Prerequisites: permission required, see appropriate form online at University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


FINC-411 (Formerly B663) 3-0-3

Finance Seminar

In a seminar setting, drawing on the knowledge of the fundamentals and advanced concepts studied in finance classes, students in this course will develop skills to become a better decision maker by learning how to integrate the various topics of finance. Through problem-oriented exercises, students will develop an appreciation of the importance and know-how of anticipating, recognizing and adapting to external forces in the decision-making process and organization. Finance as a functional area is dynamic, and emphasis will be placed on incorporating the most recent academic and practitioner literature, which is of theoretical and practical importance in the decision-making process. This challenging course is built around readings, finance cases, research papers and problem sets; and includes group and individual assignments and written and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: senior status, FINC-303, FINC-321, FINC-322


FREN-101(Formerly L343) 3-0-3

French I

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


FREN-201 (Formerly L643)3-0-3

French II

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


FREN-301 (Formerly L743)3-0-3

French III

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed two semesters of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on advancing oral expression, listening comprehension and the development of reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence and express themselves fluidly entirely in the target language. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


FREN-401 (Formerly L843)3-0-3

French IV

An intermediate course that provides students with the opportunity to communicate in a fluent and sophisticated manner. The focus is on expanding the knowledge of structures and vocabulary that students have acquired in levels I-III. In addition to constant attention to speaking, writing, listening and reading, more complex ways of expression are also emphasized. Contemporary culture is explored through authentic visual media and written materials.


GER-101 (Formerly L345) 3-0-3

German I (offered infrequently)

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


GER-201 (Formerly L645)3-0-3

German II (offered infrequently)

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


 

GLOB-1011-0-1

Integrative Seminar for the Global Portfolio Part 1

This seminar prepares students to take the Global Portfolio. It introduces students to different ways of approaching global issues in contemporary society. Students must then adopt their own organizing concept that provides a framework for their individual structuring of the Global Portfolio. At the end of the seminar students will articulate their organizing concept and set up an e-portfolio that will serve as a framework for course choices as they move forward with the Global Portfolio. First Offered Spring 2014.

Prerequisite: Writing 101            

GRAPH-201 (Formerly G311)0-8-4

Design III for Graphic Design Communication

This course is an introduction to the methods, materials and vocabulary used in the communication design profession. This studio emphasizes form analysis, visual abstraction, visual metaphor and concepts in design.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in DSGNFND-203, ADFND-102, INDD-102 or VSDES-101 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-202 (Formerly G312) 0-8-4

Design IV for Graphic Design Communication

This course introduces the student to typography and its uses through sequential studies to support the building of a visual vocabulary. Students will examine the individual letterform, letters in combination and large bodies of text with a concentration on the grid, hierarchy, legibility and clarity of conceptual communication.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-201 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-208 3-0-3

History of Graphic Design

(Writing Intensive)

This course will chronicle the evolution of modern Graphic Design through an in-depth survey of human visual communication, beginning with the invention of writing and communication, through the creation of the Gutenberg Press and culminating with the study of the contemporary digital age. Discussion will focus on the function of Graphic Design to communicate and meet human needs with an emphasis on the influence of technology and the evolving role of design in business.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101 AND ARTH-101 OR ARTH-102.


GRAPH-301 (Formerly G511) 0-8-4

Design V for Graphic Design Communication

This course will build on learning objectives and skills acquired in Design IV to advance students’ typographic skills. Emphasis will be placed on the complex interplay of visual meaning and form and typographic sensitivity within a historical context.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-202 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-302 (Formerly G512) 0-8-4

Design VI for Graphic Design Communication

This course will focus on the understanding and creation of cohesive branding systems through a systems approach to design with application to such items as a logo, stationery system, packaging, advertisement and other related collateral. The continued investigation of typography and its application will be stressed.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-301


GRAPH-305 (Formerly G641) 1-5-3

Exhibit Design and Signage

This course concentrates on the adaptation of graphic skills to three‐dimensional structures and environments. Students will study structures and commercial systems available for product display, exhibit design and signage.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-202 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-310 (Formerly G626) 1-5-3

Digital Imaging and Photographic Manipulation

This course will focus on enhancing or manipulating photographic images utilizing the computer. Students may create or import their own images with a scanner or digital camera, and use Photoshop tools and filters to enhance, alter or manipulate the image for artistic or design purposes.

Prerequisite: ARCH-202 or INTD-202 or GRAPH-202 or INDD-202


GRAPH-320 (Formerly G637) 1-5-3

Package Design

This course will allow students to apply graphic knowledge to dimensional structures. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay between graphics and structures and the ability of structural design and materials to enhance conceptual communication.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-202 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-341 (Formerly G644) 1-5-3

Illustration

This course includes original image making in a variety of techniques and media, including exploration of both computer design and traditional methods. Emphasis is placed on unity of concept and media and effective use of visual translation and metaphor.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-202 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-381 (Formerly G991) 0-0-3

Independent Study

For further details, see general description of Independent Study in the “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Prerequisites: GRAPH-301 and permission of the Instructor, advisor, and the Director of the Graphic Design Communication program. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


GRAPH-401 (Formerly G711) 0-12-6

Design VII for Graphic Design Communication

(writing intensive)

This course will focus on developing design concepts and establishing a visual language that will be applied to various formats while utilizing a systems design approach. The character of the project will support a unified theme/concept/idea for an identified client that is geared to a specific market or interest group. There will also be research and conceptual development work towards a written proposal for faculty review in preparation for the following semester’s Capstone in Graphic Design project.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-302


GRAPH-407 (Formerly G631) 1-5-3

Philadelphia University Design Workshop

This course will provide students with an opportunity to work on real projects for real clients (University, non-profit and/or industry), thus offering a chance to gain valuable, practical experience while still in school. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams, gain exposure to client relations and the professional presentation of their work and be exposed to all levels of production as it relates to these projects. The course is open to junior and senior-level Graphic Design Communication and Interactive Design and Media students only upon prior portfolio review by the instructor.

Prerequisite: Grade of C (2.00) or better in GRAPH 301 (for GD students) or DIGD 301 (for DD students). No students will be admitted to the course without prior portfolio review and by permission of the instructor.


GRAPH-408 (Formerly G634) 1-5-3

Advanced Publication Design

This course will focus on publication design and the continued development of projects with increased conceptual and physical complexity. The relationship between editorial content and design format will be explored. Original image-making through illustrative, photographic or any other means will be encouraged. The application of charts, graphs, tables and quantitative information will be investigated.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-202 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-409 1-5-3

Issues in Information Design

This course introduces students to issues in the design and communication of typical information categories through a range of design, media, and scales. Topics are raised in the categories of cartography, comparative data and diagrams. Emphasis is placed on exploration, understanding and process.

Prerequisite: GRAPH 202 or INDD 202


GRAPH-499 (Formerly G712) 0-12-6

Capstone in Graphic Design Communication

Students develop projects independently and are required to demonstrate ability and understanding of communication design theory, process and principles. The final project requires research of topic, design exploration, development and final professional presentation. The syllabus also requires the development and presentation of a resume and a final portfolio of work selected from projects students have produced during their studies in the program.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in GRAPH-401 and faculty approval or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


GRAPH-208 3-0-3

History of Graphic Design

(Writing Intensive)

The History of Graphic Design course will chronicle the evolution of modern graphic design through an in-depth survey of human visual communication throughout history. The course will begin with an investigation of the invention of writing and communication, trace through to the creation of the Gutenberg Press and culminate with the study of the modern, digital age. Discussion will focus on the function of Graphic Design to communicate and meet human need with an emphasis on the influence of technology and the evolving role of design in business. This course is designated as a Writing Intensive course within the Graphic Design curriculum according to Writing Intensive Course Guidelines.

Prerequisite: ARTH-102


HIST-114 (Formerly L173)3-0-3

America in Focus: Themes in U.S. History

Students will engage with historical methods and materials through the exploration of a specific, instructor-chosen theme designed to illuminate major developments in the American experience. The course will focus on evaluating historical sources, both primary and secondary, to help students trace the evolution of the United States from its agrarian roots to its emergence as a global superpower. Students will discuss, interpret, and analyze historical concepts in a seminar format that emphasizes writing and analytical reading (this course may not be used to fulfill a free elective requirement).


HIST-381 (Formerly H299) 0-0-3

Independent Study in History

Students will complete an intensive research on a topic in history. This course can be taken for College Studies credit. For further details, see general description of Independent Study in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required, see appropriate form on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


HONOR-300 (Formerly U371) 0-0-(3-12)

Honors Study Abroad

This non-credit option allows a student to earn honors credit while completing a semester in another country. Students interested in pursuing Honors Study Abroad work with their academic advisor and/or faculty to prepare a proposal to study/observe a facet of the host country’s culture. Upon return to campus, students will offer a presentation of their observations to the campus community.


HONOR-3100-0-0

Honors Summer Readings

This non-credit option is a very popular option. Exclusively on BlackBoard, students read, discuss and complete assignments of selected books under the guidance of a faculty member. The course counts toward one of the seven courses required for the honors certificate. To enroll, students must be in good standing in the Honors Program. This is a non-credit option.


HONOR-355 (Formerly U361) 0-0-0

Honors Community Service

Students interested in pursuing Honors Community Service work with the Honors director and/or campus community service coordinator to: 1) identify a local service effort, and 2) prepare a proposal to earn honors credit. This is a non-credit option.


HONOR-381, HONOR-382 (Formerly U381, U382)0-0-3, 0-0-3

Honors Independent Study I and II

Students interested in pursuing Honors Independent Study should meet with the faculty member with whom they want to study to prepare an outline of the topic, goals and objectives for the semester’s work. Proposals should be turned in to the Honors director three weeks before pre-registration.

See general description of Independent Study in “University Academic Policies and Procedures section. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.

Prerequisites: junior/senior status and in good standing toward completing the Honors Program Scholar certificate.


HONOR-391, HONOR-392 (Formerly U391, U392)0-0-3, 0-0-3

Honors Research I and II

Students interested in pursuing Honors Research should meet with the faculty member to plan a research project outlining the topic and inquiry. Proposals should be turned in to the Honors director three weeks before pre-registration.

Prerequisites: junior/senior status and in good standing toward completing the Honors Program Scholar certificate.


HSCI-100 (Formerly PAS-100)1-0-1

Introduction to Health Professions

This lecture and seminar course will familiarize the student with the concept, education, certification, legislation and roles of a variety of healthcare professions. The structure of the U.S. healthcare system, along with ethical and current controversial issues related to that system, will be discussed.


HSCI-230 (Formerly PAS-230)1-1-2

Introduction to Healthcare

This lecture and seminar course is designed to expose students in pre-health majors to the basic principles of human interaction in the clinical setting. Current issues in healthcare will also be discussed. This course includes 50 hours of required patient contact experience in a healthcare facility.


HSCI-320 (Formerly PAS-320)0-6-3

Clinical Interactions

This experiential, independent-study course includes an extended community-service volunteer experience (150 hours) in a healthcare setting. Students are required to complete and submit activity logs, a final paper and an evaluation from their supervisor.


HSCI-330 (Formerly PAS-330)3-0-3

Medical Terminology

This course is designed for students in undergraduate health science programs and focuses on the structure and use of medical language and common documentation formats. It also includes an introduction to medical informatics. Clinical cases are utilized to illustrate the use of medical terminology in the healthcare setting. This course provides a more in-depth examination of this subject than PAS-400.


HUMN-215 (Formerly L383)3-0-3

Evil and Good

A study of evil and good in art, literature, religion and philosophy, with attention to actual issues of evil and good in human social life. Concepts of evil and good in both Western and non-Western cultures will be surveyed. The course will also provide an introduction to strategies for ethical decision-making.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


HUMN-223 (Formerly L382) 3-0-3

World Philosophies

This course takes a comparative approach to the study of philosophy, investigating the nature of philosophical activity in diverse cultures. The central question addressed in the course is: “Is the most reliable knowledge acquired through philosophical reasoning, scientific observation or religious devotion?”

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


HUMN-225 (Formerly LIT-225 and L381) 3-0-3

Exploring World Literature

In this course, students approach culture as reflected in the worlds created by individual writers in their works. The course emphasizes close reading, critical analysis and frequent writing about assigned readings. This course may be used to satisfy a College Studies requirement.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-11X


HUMN-381 (Formerly H399) 0-0-3

Independent Study in the Humanities

In this course, students will complete intensive research on a topic that does not fall within a particular discipline in the humanities or that is interdisciplinary in nature. The course can be taken for College Studies credit. For further details, see general description of Independent Study in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


HUMN-382 (Formerly L959) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Languages

See the statement on Independent Study in the ““University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


IENGR-315 (Formerly EN616)3-0-3

The course explores dynamic programming; decision theory involving one stage problem; probabilistic models of operations research; inventory theory; Markov chains; queuing theory and simulation.

Prerequisites: ENGR-304, ENGR-307


IENGR-413 (Formerly EN711) 3-0-3

Simulation Systems

The course explores procedures and rationale for planning, designing and implementing computer simulation experiments used to analyze human-machine systems in engineering, business and social sciences.

Prerequisite: IENGR-315


IENGR-414 (Formerly EN514) 3-0-3

Manufacturing Quality Control

This course covers the methods used for statistical quality control, capability analysis, monitoring and improvement. Students will learn the techniques, as well as the software available (Minitab, Excel and SPSS) required to implement these techniques.

Prerequisite: ENGR-305


IENGR-415 (Formerly EN617) 3-0-3

Production Planning and Control

This course covers several techniques that focus on efficient operations management within any organization. The topics include forecasting, inventory management, production systems – MRP, JIT, CONWIP - aggregated workforce planning, production scheduling and supply chain management. Even though the topics seem to be oriented to the manufacturing industry, the concepts taught in this course are applicable to any type of organization, including service, health care, manufacturing, financial and others.

Prerequisite: ENGR 307, pre or co-requisite ENGR 498


IENGR-418 3-0-3

Systems Engineering

This course focuses on implementation of continuous process improvement within an organization. The purpose of the course is to provide the students with a comprehensive treatment of different tools employed successfully by industries for creating value while eliminating waste (non-value added activities). The course includes lean thinking, value stream mapping, cellular manufacturing, cycle time reduction, Kaisen training, Kanban production systems and Six Sigma.

Prerequisite: IENGR-315, pre or co-requisite IENGR-413; pre or co-requisite ENGR-427; co-register with ENGR-498


IENGR-420 3-0-3

Integrating Business and Engineering

The course is designed to help students understand how business and engineering work together in an organization. This course will cover the fundamental concepts of financial reports, marketing, strategic planning, and product life-cycle management. The focus of the course is to prepare the engineering students to make decisions related to technology, product and process development, in a way that combines technical, financial, marketing and strategic dimensions.

Prerequisite: ENGR 303, IENGR 418


IENGR-426 3-0-3

Supply Chain Modeling and Analysis

This course is a designated elective that can be selected as one of the two required designated electives for the BSISE. The course provides a broad introduction to many critical facets of supply chain. Students in this course will apply industrial engineering tools learned through the curriculum to design, analyze and optimize the supply chain such as, mathematical optimization, inventory management, transportation and network location, facilities planning and material handling. Then, more advanced topics are interrelated such as the value of information sharing in the supply chain, and customer value strategic alliances, international issues and decision support systems.

Prerequisites: IENGR-413, IENGR-415


IENGR-427 (Formerly EN717) 3-0-3

Facility Planning & Material Handling

Physical organization of work places and departments to optimize objectives such as material movement, safety and worker satisfaction. Review of ISE methods for work-place design and productivity measurement and economic decision-making. Computer solutions for layout problems and mathematical models for location problems. Analysis and design of material handling, warehousing and distribution systems.

Prerequisites: ENGR-307; pre or co-requisite ENGR-498


INDD-101 (Formerly I111)0-8-4

Design I for Industrial Design

This studio is an introduction to design for undergraduate majors in industrial design. The course will provide an intensive introduction to design as an iterative problem-solving process. It will also introduce strategies for making and analyzing form, and present basic techniques of two-dimensional visualization and documentation of three-dimensional objects and principles of design critique, testing and research.


INDD-102 (Formerly I112) 0-8-4

Design II for Industrial Design

This studio introduces methods, materials and vocabulary of the industrial design profession, as well as design as a rational, iterative process of problem solving based on working creatively within constraints. Working with materials, digital and hand tools, shop processes and presentation techniques used by professionals are emphasized. It is intensive in industrial design drawing, including sketches, development drawings, orthographic, axonometric and perspective renderings, as well as beginning drafting as used in industrial design, with dimensioned assembly and parts drawings.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-101 or ADFND-101 or permission of the director of the Industrial Design program.


INDD-106 (Formerly I321) 2-4-3

Materials and Process: Fabrication

This course introduces shop techniques as they pertain to industrial design model-making and prototype construction. All industrial design students must take this course for shop equipment safety training and pass a safety test. Throughout the semester, attention is given to safety precautions for the shop, along with demonstrations of shop equipment and fabrication processes. A major portion of the course will consist of developing an understanding of the materials and machinery commonly used by industrial designers for producing both working and appearance models.


INDD-201 (Formerly I311) 0-8-4

Design III for Industrial Design

This course focuses on creative problem-solving techniques using drawing, sketch modeling and basic shop skills. Students are exposed to a wide choice of materials, which industrial designers use to move their projects forward. Students will use several media for the purpose of documenting projects in progress, for duplication and for presentation purposes. Emphasis is placed on the improvement of craft in the execution of projects.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-102


INDD-202 (Formerly I312) 0-8-4

Design IV for Industrial Design

During the fourth in a series of eight studios, designs are conceived that explore the dynamics between objects and the user’s senses and emotions. Students are challenged to improve their ability to define problems, generate concepts, evaluate these and offer refinements of solutions. Students will use basic imaging techniques in the presentation of design solutions.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-201


INDD-205 (Formerly I351) 1-4-3

Rendering for Industrial Design

This course is an introduction to the traditional techniques and materials that industrial designers use to develop and represent three-dimensional concepts and ideas. Students become proficient in the use of pencils, markers, pastels and airbrush on a variety of media. Emphasis is placed on understanding the significance of color and graphic applications for industrial design.

Prerequisite: DRAW-201 or permission of the instructor


INDD-207 (Formerly I322) 2-4-3

Materials and Processes: Manufacturing

This course is concerned with the exploration of materials used in the mass production of products, the processes used to shape these materials and the applicability of these materials to product-design solutions. Students should be prepared to visit a number of manufacturing facilities. A survey of rapid prototyping technologies completes the course.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-102 or ENGR-102


INDD-210 (Formerly I332) 2-2-3

Ergonomic Studies

This course analyzes human factors as related to broad aspects of design development. It explores the issues of operator/user human factors and their impact on design. The outcome of this course will be to ascertain the relationship of basic human dimensions on product design. Subjects include systems reliability, sensory and motor processes, basic research techniques and anthropometric studies.

Prerequisite: INDD-106 or permission of the instructor


INDD-301 (Formerly I511) 0-8-4

Design V for Industrial Design

The fifth in a series of eight studios, this course focuses on ideas of designs derived from an understanding of consumer behavior. Emphasis is placed on user needs, ease of use and product culture, without ignoring the practicalities imposed by manufacturer’s markets, manufacturing process constraints and investment concerns. Students will demonstrate control of the process of design to develop meaningful concepts that employ appropriate technology for their eventual realization.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-202


INDD-302 (Formerly I512) 0-12-6

Design VI for Industrial Design

In this sixth of a series of eight studio courses, students design and develop consumer products. Students learn about the complexities of the product-development process, during which assembly requirements, marketing issues, materials and component development all affect the initial intent of their designs. Students are required to fabricate a fully functional prototype of their designs. A selected team of professionals from the industry will evaluate the final product.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-301


INDD-304 (Formerly I532) 3-1-3

Design History/Theory

This writing intensive seminar will serve as a forum for students to explore the context and scope of the practice of industrial design through readings, research, critical discussions, written presentations and papers. This course is intensive and incorporates a workshop component in which students will use various theoretical frameworks to examine their own attitudes and design work through papers and spoken/graphic presentations.

Prerequisite: INDD-324 or permission of instructor


INDD-306A 6-36-1

Intercultural Innovation: Study Abroad Component

During a short experience in a foreign country, students will observe and document cultural and

demographic differences between countries through formal lectures, and field observation and team exercises. The work in this class is informed by the use of user-based observational research techniques. Documentation from this phase is brought back to the US for use in the INDD 306B Intercultural Innovation: Interdisciplinary Project Component class. Students should plan on taking BOTH classes.


INDD-306B 0-2-2

Intercultural Innovation: Interdisciplinary Project Component

This is the second in a two-course sequence. This class builds on work done in the INDD 306A

Intercultural Innovation: Study Abroad Component course. Students should plan on taking BOTH classes. In INDD 306B, students bring research by interdisciplinary teams outside the US into well-documented opportunities for new products, business platforms or systems. In a series of team meetings and design critiques, they then turn them into cohesive proposals including both design and business elements.


INDD-324 (Formerly I531) 3-0-3

History of Design and Communication

This lecture course begins with industrialization and leads to the development of modern design and philosophy. Aspects of industrial design and graphic communication will be critically reviewed. Current design events will be studied interactively and discussed as a continuation of past design inquiries.


INDD-381 (Formerly I891) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Industrial Design

For further details, see general description of Independent Study in ““University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Prerequisites: INDD-302 and permission of the instructor. See appropriate form on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


INDD-401 (Formerly I711) 0-12-6

Design VII for Industrial Design

The seventh in a sequence of eight studios, this course focuses on the development and expression of design ideas through the knowledgeable assembly of electronic systems and components. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with technology as it applies to the practice of industrial design. It will focus on technology in three areas: expansion of human ability, augmentation and articulation in industry, and creativity and development enhancement.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INDD-302


INDD-402 (Formerly I712) 0-12-6

Design VIII for Industrial Design

The last in a sequence of eight studio courses, this course is entirely dedicated to the student’s capstone project. It is structured to simulate all aspects of client/designer dynamics, research requirements and project-management issues. Students secure a sponsor from industry or from the industrial design profession, choose the topic of the thesis and present the outcome of their project in a public forum.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in INDD-401 and concurrent enrollment in INDD-494


INDD-493 (Formerly I851) 2-2-3

Professional Practice I

The first in a two-course sequence will address the business, legal and ethical issues in the practice of industrial design. It addresses vital business imperatives in the field of industrial design and such issues impacting on independent consultant design practice and corporate design staff activities. Through research, students begin a personal exploration of the different disciplines embraced by the profession. Students begin networking with the profession to secure and negotiate commitments for their capstone project. This course is writing intensive.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in INDD-302


INDD-494 (Formerly I862) 2-2-3

Professional Practice II

The second in a two-course sequence begins with management concerns related directly to the capstone project. Assignments serve to research project design solutions. The second half of the course focuses on presentation preparations for the capstone project, the integration of the project into the portfolio and the development of this portfolio in digital media. Students are exposed to various issues related to finding gainful employment.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in INDD-401, INDD-493 and concurrent enrollment in INDD-402


INFO-101 (Formerly B122)2-2-3

Introduction to Information Systems

The course provides an introduction to the principles of business information processing and the structure and operation of modern digital computers and networks. Included are practical applications and hands-on experience with a word processor, spreadsheets, database, presentation software and World Wide Web authoring software.


INTD-1020-8-4

Design 2: Interior Design

This interior design foundation studio is a synthesis of fundamental design principles and an introduction to research as a tool for understanding programming and design. Lectures and demonstrations will utilize the case-study methodology to investigate various design strategies and to chart the historical course of modernism within the context of residential design. This first interior design studio introduces students to methodologies, processes, color theory, and design elements relevant to interior design.

Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in ADFND-101


INTD-106 (Formerly A123) 1-4-3

Technical Drawing and Graphic Representation

Following one semester of drawing, this course focuses on the fundamentals of creative graphic representation. Specific topics of emphasis include surveying building interiors, the construction of orthographic and paraline projections including floor plans, elevations, sections and one-point and two-point perspectives.

Prerequisite: DRAW-101 and ADFND-101


INTD-201 (Formerly A315) 0-8-4

Design 3 for Interior Design

This studio examines the elements, principles and theories of interior design within the framework of residential and hospitality design. Students will explore and synthesize conceptual, theoretical, functional, and aesthetic issues. Additional foci include the organization and interrelationship of multi-level interior spaces, elements of enclosure, human behavior issues, symbolism and socio- cultural factors. The craft of making and the role of color, materials, furniture, fixtures and equipment in defining spaces and environmental experience will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: INTD-106 and grade of "C" or better in INTD-102


INTD-202 (Formerly A316) 0-8-4

Design 4 for Interior Design

Through diverse design projects, this studio introduces students to the conceptual, theoretical, functional and aesthetic issues related to civic/educational and commercial interiors for contrasting populations. The integration of intuitive and structured design processes will be emphasized. The development of spaces, selection of furniture, fixtures, equipment and materials will be made in relation to performance and experiential requirements. This course incorporates collaboration, research, writing, and analysis to explore human behavior and needs in the built environment.

Prerequisite: grade "C" or better in INTD-201


INTD-206 (Formerly A346) 1-4-3

Interior Building Technology

This course focuses on construction and installation as it specifically relates to interior design. Students will be introduced to the nature and characteristics of interior detailing in relation to interior construction such as architectural woodwork, millwork, partitions, floors, ceilings, stairs, custom cabinetry, furniture and specialty elements. The influence of interior finish materials on interior form and detailing will be explored. Additional foci include human factors, building codes, accessibility requirements, fire safety, materials regulations and construction documentation.

Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-210 and INTD-Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-210 and INTD 201


INTD-208 (Formerly A601) 2-2-3

Presentation Techniques

This elective course explores several types of rendering techniques for interior design and architectural spaces. It consists of discussion, demonstration and experimentation with freehand and constructed perspectives, various drawing and rendering media, basic digital rendering techniques and various presentation methods.
Prerequisite: INTD-201


INTD-301 (Formerly A515) 0-12-6

Design 5 for Interior Design

This interior design studio challenges students with increased complexity of three-dimensional interior space, program, concept, and design process in the context of community oriented commercial/retail design. Students will translate their design thinking into comprehensive solutions that address place making, branding, construction technology, materiality, lighting design, human factors, furniture selection/planning, building codes and standards. This studio incorporates collaboration to enhance understanding of teamwork in design practice.

Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in INTD-202


INTD-302 (Formerly A516) 0-12-6

Design 6 for Interior Design

This studio concentrates on contemporary issues relating to business/office typologies, building technology, and sustainable design. Design and technological issues are addressed through: an understanding of office culture, form making, construction systems, solar considerations, indoor environmental quality, HVAC systems, space planning, material and finish selection, lighting design, and integration of systems furniture and equipment. Solutions emphasize holistic and sustainable design thinking, organization of complex spatial responses, and the understanding that design is inherently constructive in nature.

Prerequisites: grade of "C" or better in INTD-301


INTD-304 0-1-.5

Integrated Community Service

This integrated community service course is required in the Interior Design major. It is an opportunity for students to use and apply their acquired knowledge in a “real world” setting and to work in integrated and collaborative teams. Students will experience the reciprocal nature and responsibility of community service work as fully participating citizens within the greater Philadelphia region.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INTD-202, or permission of the instructor.


INTD-305 (Formerly A745) 2-2-3

Interior Building Systems

This course will focus on the understanding and application of a broad range of mechanical, electrical, lighting, acoustical, plumbing, HVAC, security and other building systems in the context of interior design. Students will be introduced to the nature and characteristics of fire detection, protection and suppression in building interiors. The critical role of interior building systems in establishing and maintaining the health, safety and welfare of users will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: INTD-206 and INTD-202


INTD-306 1-4-3

Advanced Visualization: Interiors

This course teaches advanced digital three-dimensional modeling, rendering, and animation techniques with a focus on interior environments. Emphasis is placed on accurate and realistic representation of interior spaces, forms, materials, furniture, color and lighting effects, and the creation of virtual walkthroughs. These professional level skills enhance design representations and presentations. Students complete a series of exercises and projects covering a series of advanced digital techniques.

Prerequisites: ARCHDSN-208 Vis I: Digital Modeling, and a grade of “C” or better in INTD-202: Design IV: Interior Design-delete or permission of the program director


INTD-308 (Formerly A625) 1-4-3

CAD 2 for Interior Design

Following Visualization 1: Digital Modeling, the introductory computer-aided design course, CAD 2 for Interior Design further develops students’ design communication and documentation skills utilizing AutoCAD and BIM software. Students will have the opportunity to produce interior design working drawings and advance their knowledge of professional interior design construction and specification documents.

Prerequisite: ARCHDSN-208, INTD-206, INTD-202


INTD-310 (Formerly A526) 3-0-3

Textiles and Materials for Interiors and Architecture

This course introduces the role of textiles in the creation of commercial and residential interiors. Key topics include the selection, specification and application of textiles based on their properties and performance criteria; sources of textiles and fabrics; the concept of sustainable resources; appropriate installation methods and maintenance requirements of textiles in interior applications; codes; regulations and standards related to use of textiles in interiors; and estimating material requirements such as carpeting, wallpaper and ceiling finishes.

Prerequisite: INTD-201 or permission of the instructor


INTD-311 (Formerly A616) 2-2-3

Introduction to Set Design

This elective focuses on developing the setting for the action of a play. The set designer develops many of the same skills exercised by architects/interior designers: mastery of design fundamentals, understanding of time and place, knowledge of construction techniques and awareness of how people use space. Steps to creating the stage set will include: careful reading and discussion of selected plays, surveying an existing stage, assisting in the construction of a stage set and attending assigned performances.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in both ARCH-311 and ARCH-312 or LARCH-302, or grade of “C” or better in INTD-302


INTD-325 (Formerly A615) 2-2-3

Furniture Design

This beginning-level elective course is intended to provide students with a basic knowledge of the aspects involved in furniture design. The goal is to expose students to the various means through which one engages in product design. Emphasis is on the fabrication process in addition to prototyping, testing and revision. The course consists of readings, brief lectures, class discussions and studio projects that cover the range of information that designers need to know to be able to specify, design and evaluate furniture-related products for the built environment. A significant amount of class time will be devoted to the development, design and revision of projects.

Prerequisite: grade “C” or better in ARCH-201, INDD-201, LARCH-201 or INTD-201


INTD-401 (Formerly A715) 0-12-6

Design 7 for Interior Design

This advanced comprehensive studio emphasizes the resolution of design issues in a semester-long specialized project. It spans from schematic design through design development and construction documentation and builds upon the knowledge acquired in all previous design, history/theory, and technical courses. Students synthesize their research and design ideation and apply their knowledge of typology, program, function, form making, planning, human behavior, construction, materials, building systems, acoustics, lighting, FF&E, codes and standards in a comprehensive final presentation.

Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in INTD-302


INTD-412 (Formerly A753) 2-1-2

Interior Professional Practice and Contract Design

In this seminar, the interior design student will analyze the specialized services performed by the professional designer by studying the administrative, legal, ethical and financial aspects of professional practice. Contract documents, specifications, safety standards and building codes will be studied within the context of a non-residential (contract) design project.

Prerequisite: INTD-206 and grade of “C” or better in INTD-302


INTD-487 (Formerly A717) 1-4-3

Capstone Research and Programming for Interior Design

This course gives students the opportunity to assess their inclinations in the field and to select a project that addresses their specific interest. Students are expected to generate individualized research and programming to be used for design and development in their Capstone Project the following semester. They will produce a Capstone Research & Programming Document, which will be the result of research, analysis, and the synthesis of information. It will articulate a clear definition of project parameters and programming. The process of generating this document will recapitulate and augment the research and programming process, which students have been exposed to in previous interior design studios.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in INTD-302


INTD-488 (Formerly A718) 0-12-6

Capstone Project for Interior Design

The interior design Capstone semester provides students with an opportunity to focus on an area of concentration in a design project, which will be independently developed with a designated faculty member. The student must demonstrate aptitude and understanding of architectural and interior design theory, principles, and technology, as well as, overall design competence. The Capstone project includes research in the student’s selected problem area, development of the design concept, detailing and creative presentation of the design investigation.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in INTD-401 and INTD-487


INTRN 493 0.5-6

Internship

Academic internships at Philadelphia University aid students in professional preparation through a work experience directly related to their major and career goals. Three credit registration options exist in 0.5 credit, 3 credit and 6 credit increments. All are completed as elective academic courses, including a course syllabus focused on professional skill-building and written assignments. While the primary emphasis on the course is on the internship work experience, course assignments are incorporated to prompt reflection on the internship. This reflection is an integral component of experiential learning and students’ overall career and professional development.

The Career Services Center and designated Faculty Internship Advisor (FIA) from the student’s major provide support and guidance during the semester of participation. Career Services staff is also available to assist students with internship search strategy prior to the internship. At the conclusion of the internship semester, all students are evaluated both by their employer and FIA, receiving a grade derived from successful performance as determined by the employer, the quality of academic assignments submitted to faculty, and completion of minimum required hours. All internships, regardless of credit registration, are a minimum of twelve weeks in length.

Academic internships are offered during the fall, spring and twelve week summer terms. The deadline to register for academic internships is the last day to add classes for the semester of intended participation, as established by the Registrar’s Office (refer to the academic calendar for specific deadlines). Students are strongly encouraged to apply early and contact Career Services for assistance, providing the best success in finding an appropriate experience in time to meet registration deadlines.

To learn more about academic internships at Philadelphia University, visit www.philau.edu/career or contact Career Services.

Minimum requirements for participation:

Undergraduate:

  • Students must maintain full-time status during the regular academic year
  • Completion of 60 credits by the start of the internship experience (90 credits for Architecture and Landscape Architecture majors)
  • 2.5 cumulative GPA in the semester preceding the internship and in good academic standing at the university. Students on academic probation are ineligible.
  • If a transfer student, at least 15 credits earned at PhilaU

International:

  • Meet criteria above as relevant
  • Determine if eligible for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) by contacting the office for International Student Programs

Note: Students not meeting minimum requirements may be considered by submitting a formal appeal and should contact Career Services for further instructions.


ITAL-101 (Formerly L346)3-0-3

Italian I

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


ITAL-201 (Formerly L646)3-0-3

Italian II

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


ITAL-301 (Formerly L746)3-0-3

Italian III

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed two semesters of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on advancing oral expression, listening comprehension and the development of reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence and express themselves fluidly entirely in the target language. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


ITAL-4013-0-3

Italian IV

An intermediate course that provides students with the opportunity to communicate in a fluent and sophisticated manner. The focus is on expanding the knowledge of structures and vocabulary that students have acquired in levels I-III. In addition to constant attention to speaking, writing, listening and reading, more complex ways of expression are also emphasized. Contemporary culture is explored through authentic visual media and written materials.


ITXA-100 3-0-3

Introduction to Textual Analysis

Students in this course will learn strategies for reading and thinking critically, analyzing evidence from a variety of academic sources, and retaining content. Students will complete assignments in academic reading, note taking, review techniques, and critical thinking skills. Students must earn a "C" or better to receive credit for this course. Students required to take Introduction to Textual Analysis must not register for HIST-114 in the same semester.


ITXA-100G 3-0-3

Introduction to Textual Analysis: Global

This course parallels Introduction to Textual Analysis [ITXA-100] but is designed for students who did not learn English as their first language. As with ITXA-100, its main focus is on strategies for reading and thinking critically, analyzing evidence from a variety of academic sources, and retaining content along with vocabulary expansion. Students will complete assignments in academic reading, note taking, review techniques, and critical thinking. Students must earn a "C" or better to receive credit for this course. Students required to take Introduction to Textual Analysis must not register for HIST-114 in the same semester.


JAPN-101 (Formerly L341)3-0-3

Japanese I

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


JAPN-201 (Formerly L641)3-0-3

Japanese II

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


JAPN-301 (Formerly L741)3-0-3

Japanese III

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed two semesters of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on advancing oral expression, listening comprehension and the development of reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence and express themselves fluidly entirely in the target language. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


JAPN-401 (Formerly L841)3-0-3

Japanese IV

An intermediate course that provides students with the opportunity to communicate in a fluent and sophisticated manner. The focus is on expanding the knowledge of structures and vocabulary that students have acquired in levels I-III. In addition to constant attention to speaking, writing, listening and reading, more complex ways of expression are also emphasized. Contemporary culture is explored through authentic visual media and written materials.


JSINT-3XX3-0-3

Integrative Professional Seminars

(writing intensive)

Integrative Professional Seminars offer an in-depth examination of specific topics or themes related to the University’s professional majors. Geared for a general audience, these courses allow students to explore topics from a variety of perspectives, including those from the disciplines of history, the social sciences and/or the humanities. As advanced writing-intensive courses within the College Studies program, these courses prepare students for senior capstone courses in College Studies and the majors by developing their research, communication and critical-thinking skills. To view current course offerings in this category, go to www.PhilaU.edu/JuniorSeminars.

Prerequisite: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSINT-360 (was LARCH-306)3-0-3

Human Behavior and the Physical Environment

This course provides an introduction to a range of viewpoints, concepts, and characteristics of human behavior that should be considered during the design process. Cultural, social, and psychological factors are examined, e.g., relationships to water, responses to open and enclosed spaces, roles of textures and aromas. Various theories and methods of environmental assessment and design are studied that are based on an understanding of mutually supportive relationships between people and their physical environment. All people use various types of spaces in different ways and reaction to varying stimuli differently—why not understand the underlying cultural and psychological factors?

Prerequisites: LARCH-202 or ARCH-202 or permission of the director SOC-2xx and WRTG-21x.


JSINT 378 3-0-3

Ethnographic Research Methods


This course explores a range of ethnographic research tools to analyze human belief, behavior and cultural practices. Students learn to formulate better research questions and conduct ethnographic research to address a contemporary social problem, and will become equipped to analyze and communicate the findings. Students reflect upon their impact in the community and on other ethical questions as part of conducting ethnographic research. Pre requisites: WRTG-2xx, SOC-2xx


JSINT-384 (Formerly SOC-317)3-0-3

Applied Professional Ethics

(writing intensive)

This research and writing-intensive course introduces students to numerous concepts in Western and non-Western ethics that inform decisions about what we “ought” to do in our personal and professional lives. Students will read primary text selections from philosophers and analyze practical cases by applying what they have read.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-3XX3-0-3

Liberal Arts Seminars
(writing intensive)

Liberal Arts Seminars offer an in-depth examination of specific topics or themes related to the disciplines of history, the social sciences and/or the humanities. Designed for a general audience, these courses allow students in their junior year build upon the skills and knowledge gained in the introductory College Studies courses in these disciplines. As advanced writing-intensive courses within the College Studies program, these courses prepare students for senior capstone courses in College Studies and the majors by developing their research, communication and critical-thinking skills. To view current course offerings in this category, go to www.PhilaU.edu/JuniorSeminars.

Prerequisite: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-360 (Formerly JSLA-350) 3-0-3

Creative Writing: Shaping Narrative and Experience

(writing intensive)

In this hands-on course, students develop their knowledge of how to shape narrative and experience through forms of creative written expression such as poetry and fiction. Students will read and analyze work in these forms; experiment with these forms through writing their own creative drafts and revisions; and develop critiquing skills in a workshop environment. Students showcase their work in a final portfolio and a reading open to the University community.

Prerequisite: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-361 (Formerly LIT-320, L686) 3-0-3

From Fiction to Film

(writing intensive)

The study of the interrelationships between literature and film through case studies of the translation of significant novels (focus on 19th and 20th century) into works of cinema.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-362 (Formerly LIT-311, L683) 3-0-3

The Artist and Society in Literature and Film

(writing intensive)

An examination of the enigmatic figure of the artist depicted in literature (the short story, the novella and the novel). The genesis and complexity of artists as literary figures will be considered as they find themselves in conflict with society.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-363 (Formerly LIT-315, L685) 3-0-3

Shakespeare and Popular Culture

(writing intensive)

What role does Shakespeare’s writing play in popular culture today? How and why have modern filmmakers, artists and writers “reinterpreted” Shakespeare’s plays? Students read and discuss selected plays and examine various film adaptations of them. In addition to comparing different interpretations of Shakespeare’s plays to the originals, the course investigates some of the larger issues surrounding Shakespeare and contemporary culture.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-370 (Formerly HIST-229, L675) 3-0-3

The U.S.: The Recent Past

(writing intensive)

This course focuses on social, cultural, political and economic changes within the United States since 1945. Topics such as beatniks and hippies, the New Left, the civil rights movement, student and anti-war movements, the women’s movement, the politics of conservatism and the fate of labor will be studied in the context of an increasingly ethnically and racially diverse society. Students will be encouraged to explore and write from a wide range of sources from across the disciplines.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-380 (Formerly SOC-312, L664) 3-0-3

Human Rights

(writing intensive)

The course will examine the question of whether there are certain rights that we all possess as human beings and the prominence of these rights in international relations. Students will monitor human-rights violations in the United States and other countries in order to determine how much we have achieved as a world community and how far we have yet to go.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-381 (Formerly SOC-325, L684) 3-0-3

Gender Studies

(writing intensive)

This course focuses on recent developments in gender studies, examining how gender has been conceptualized and analyzed, historically and in the present day. Topics considered include the formation of masculinities and femininities, the intersections between gender, sexual orientation, class and race, and the significance of gender in personal and professional contexts. Readings are drawn from a variety of disciplines depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-390 (Formerly SOC-321, L673) 3-0-3

The Urban Experience

(writing intensive)

This course discusses the origins and development of urban life. Special focus will be upon Philadelphia as it represents trends in the American experience of cities.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


JSLA-391 (Formerly SOC-315, L671) 3-0-3

The African American Experience

(writing intensive)

This course explores African Americans’ struggle for freedom and equality in American society. It examines the social, economic, political and cultural realms of African American life with some exploration of cultural origins in West Africa. Students read in primary sources and use literary evidence in an interdisciplinary effort to understand the past and explore contemporary issues in American society.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2XX, SOC-2XX


KNIT-201 (Formerly T551)4-2-4

Knit Technology I

Students will study both weft- and warp-knit fabrics through an investigation of knit construction, machinery, principles and knit fabric analysis. Lectures are complemented with a series of lab exercises on hand-flat equipment and fabric-analysis projects designed to fully acquaint the student with the principles of knit-fabric design and production.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101 or TEXT-104 and Admission to the Textile Design (TEXD.BS.DAY) or Textile Materials Technology (TMT.BS.DAY) Programs or by permission of program director.


KNIT-203 (Formerly T540) 1-5-3

Knit Design Studio I

Students will learn through individual development how to create a range of texture and color effects within knit design. Independent needle selection and the use of the presser foot will be explored within design areas involving Jacquard, held-stitch and tuck-stitch structures. Design ideas will be developed through to swatch/sketch proposals suitable for sweater production.

Prerequisite: KNIT-201 and VSDES-101


KNIT-205 (Formerly T552) 4-2-4

Knit Technology II

This course is a further investigation into the construction, design and production of both weft- and warp-knit fabrics. Lectures will be complemented with lab work involving the design, production and analysis of knit fabrics upon power-knitting equipment.

Prerequisite: KNIT-201


KNIT-213 (Formerly T541) 1-5-3

Knit Design Studio II

A knit design studio elective for Textile or Fashion majors specializing in the knit-design area. Original design ideas will be developed through swatch/sketch presentations. Garment ideas will be developed through technical sketches and specifications into completed sweaters.

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in KNIT-203


KNIT-307 (Formerly T553) 3-3-4

Advanced Warp Knitting

Covers all facets of warp-knitting technology with particular emphasis on the variety of machines and fabric construction in relation to end-use applications and markets. Tricot and raschel warp-knit fabric constructions are made in the knitting laboratory to illustrate the basic warp-knit stitches and lapping motions. A variety of warp-knit fabric samples are analyzed to illustrate basic fabric geometric parameters used in the design and production of warp-knit constructions. Also, students are required to research a unique warp-knit process/product.

Prerequisite: KNIT-201


KNIT-326 (Formerly T503) 1-5-3

Advanced Weft Knitting

An exploration of the principles involved in knit design using CAD systems and electronic-knitting equipment. Students will design, write computer programs and knit their own fabrics on sweater- and jersey-knitting equipment. Fabric constructions such as Jacquard, links-links, cables, pointelle and presser-foot designs will be developed.

Prerequisite: KNIT-203 or permission of the instructor


KNIT-401 (Formerly T545) 1-5-3

Introduction to Knit Design

(for non-Textile Design majors)

This is an elective course in which students may explore the development of knit design. Design ideas will be developed on hand equipment through to swatch/sketch proposals suitable for product design. Students can take this course as a single elective and develop design work suitable for inclusion in their portfolio or take further knit-design electives in order to further their skills.

Cannot be taken as a replacement for KNIT-201.


LARCH-102 (Formerly ADFND-102 for LA Students)0-8-4

LA Design 2: Landscape Architecture Foundation

This foundation design studio is a synthesis of fundamentals of landscape architecture design principles, introduction to programmatic research and an in-depth study of design process, methodologies and craft. All explorations use the landscape as the subject of the studio. Form, texture and spatial organization are emphasized along with social, psychological and spiritual experiences of place.

Prerequisites: ADFND-101, DRAW-101


LARCH-201 0-8-4

LA Design 3: Site Design

The focus of this studio is sustainable large-scale planning and design. Students explore land-planning theories, methods and resources used in landscape analyses for sustainable settlement, preservation or management of the land. Natural, cultural and experiential data are integrated into the decision-making and design processes.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in LARCH-102


LARCH-203 1-4-3

Graphics for Landscape Architecture

In this course, the student gains proficiency in various landscape architecture graphic conventions used in generating, evaluating and presenting design ideas. Included are principles and application of graphic language, color theory, diagramming, plan and section graphics, and oblique and perspective drawings.


LARCH-204 0-8-4

LA Design 4: Regional Landscape Planning

Regional Landscape Planning builds on elements, principles and theories explored in LARCH-102 and LARCH-201, but at the regional scale. Sustainable regional land planning theories, methods and resources used in larger scale landscape analyses for settlement, preservation or management of the land are explored. Natural, cultural and experimental data are integrated into the decision-making and design processes.

Prerequisites: grade of “C” or better in LARCH-201 and LARCH-207


LARCH-206 3-0-3

History of Landscape Architecture 1

This survey course covers significant examples of landscapes and landscape design from the eastern, central Asian, and western regions of the world, produced from ancient times through the 19th centuries. Students will be introduced to the cultural and social history of each epoch as a means of critically analyzing key historical works of landscape design and addressing the ideas and concepts imbedded in the term landscape. Prerequisite: WRTG-101. (Meets Arts & Culture Requirement)


LARCH-207 2-2-3

LA Tech: Grading

This course focuses on the principles and techniques of landform manipulation for design and drainage. Students develop an understanding of contours, contour manipulation and site-construction methodologies. Topics include topographic and grading problems in landscape engineering: drainage plans, grading plans, spot elevations, road alignment, sections and profiles, and cut-and-fill calculations.

Prerequisite: LARCH-102 or ADFND-102 or permission of the director


LARCH 208 2-3-4

Local Flora

An introduction to regional native plants used in landscape architecture and ecological restoration. Characteristics, terminology and keys used in identifying plants and plant families will be taught as well as sight recognition of common species. Other topics include plant growth, development and propagation, optimal habitats and recognition of best management practices. Field work at local/regional sites constitutes a significant part of the course.

Prerequisites: BIOL-101, or grade of “C-” (1.67) or better in BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L


LARCH 210 2-2-3

Soils

This course examines soil as a living organism and foundation for all life of earth. This course discusses factors of soil formation and the basic physical, chemical, ecological, and morphological soil properties that affect soil characteristics in managed and natural landscapes. This is an interactive lecture/laboratory course complemented by local field trips with emphasis on soils from pedon to landscape as resources for environmental quality and design.


LARCH 3000-12-6

LA Design 4: Urban Design I

This design studio focuses on urban design at the site scale. It reinforces design principles learned in earlier semesters, while introducing students to increasing complexity in both program and the design process. The primary philosophic underpinning of the studio is design within a sustainable urban context. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in LARCH-201


LARCH-301 0-12-6

LA Design 5: Urban Design I

This design studio focuses on urban design at the site scale. It reinforces design principles learned in earlier semesters, while introducing students to increasing complexity in both program and the design process. The primary philosophic underpinning of the studio is design within a sustainable urban context. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in LARCH-204


LARCH-304 0-12-6

LA Design 5: Community Design

This studio focuses on community design with the physical environment viewed as a catalyst for community enhancement and revitalization. Issues include community identification, social cohesiveness, social, economic and political factors, the role of open space in urban neighborhoods and community safety and livability. Emphasis is placed on learning methods and techniques for developing physical-design solutions and implementation strategies when working with school, neighborhood and community groups. An important component of the experience is community participation.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in LARCH-301


LARCH-303 2-2-3

LA Tech: Advanced Grading

This Advanced Grading course augments what the students have learned in their first grading course, plus covers in more depth other sustainable aspects of landform manipulation for design and stormwater management. Computer applications will be used as a learning tool. Field trips to sites that are particularly appropriate for observing, measuring and experiencing the sculptural qualities and capabilities of landform are also an integral component of this course.

Prerequisite: LARCH-207


LARCH-305 2-2-3

Plant Community Ecology

This course investigates how interactions within plant species, between species and between species and their environment influences plant community structure. Questions explored include: How many species are in a given habitat type? Why these species and not others? How do they interact with each other plants? What controls their abundances in natural and urban landscapes? Students will learn how plant distributions are influenced by environmental conditions with a particular emphasis on the urban environs. In-the-field exercises constitute a significant portion of this course.

Prerequisites: LARCH-208


LARCH-307 3-0-3

History of Landscape Architecture 2

This course is the third of a four-term sequence of history/theory courses. It surveys key examples of landscape architecture from the mid-19th century to the present time. Students strengthen their vocabulary for analyzing and evaluating the designed landscape. Students are also introduced to the influential personalities, projects, events, concepts and thoughts that were pivotal in the philosophical and ethical development of the profession of landscape architecture.

Prerequisite: LARCH-206


LARCH-310 1-4-3

GIS for Landscape Analysis

Students are introduced to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications appropriate to landscape analysis. GIS is an increasingly important software tool for organizing digital spatial data in an accessible and logical manner for site design, recreation master planning, visual analysis, comprehensive planning, resource management and public advocacy.

Prerequisite: LARCH-201 or ECBIO-301


LARCH-312 2-2-3

Sustainable Planting Design

In this course students apply the ecological needs of plants to real situations such as greenroofs, xeriscaping, habitat management, brownfield restorations, meadows and highway plantings. The course stresses ecological relationships among plants and how those relationships are used in the design of these environments. In order to design and maintain these environments students need to understand planting design as well as ecology.

Prerequisites: LARCH-208 or LARCH-305


LARCH-400 0-12-6

LA Design 6: Restoration Management

This studio course focuses on restoration management methodologies and ecological landscape design principles as they apply to a damaged urban landscape. Students explore sustainable restoration methodologies, how to determine values and make choices, while being cognizant of the costs and public perception. Techniques, practices and materials—both sustainable and conventional—are evaluated as part of the planning and design processes. Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in LARCH-300


LARCH-401 0-12-6

LA Design 7: Interdisciplinary Design

Design VII is an interdisciplinary studio for landscape architecture and other design students who will work in interdisciplinary teams.

Specific studio topics may include brownfield redevelopment, co-housing development, waterfront redevelopment and community revitalization.

Prerequisites: LARCH-301 or ARCH 301


LARCH-409 2-2-3

LA Tech: Materials and Methods

This course develops concepts, methods and techniques for understanding construction materials and assembly techniques related to landscape architecture construction. Students are introduced to materials commonly used in landscape construction (wood, stone and brick, concrete and asphalt), with an emphasis on sustainable landscape construction materials and practices. Methods, concepts and principles for developing construction details are also covered, including conventional and digital communication techniques. Specialized aspects such as structural mechanics for various materials and uses are emphasized. Prerequisites: LARCH- 207 and LARCH-201 or LARCH-202


LARCH-411 3-0-3

LA History 3: Urban Landscape Design

This course includes an overview of the theories and practice of urban landscape design. The evolution of landscape urban design theories is examined through cultural, sociological, environmental and psychological factors through the study of specific urban design projects. The influence of the design profession, university programs, politics, city government and interest groups are examined along with other forces. Contemporary designs, projects and writings are included in an attempt to identify future directions of urban landscape design in the 21st century.

Prerequisites: LARCH-206 or LARCH-205 and WRTG-2XX


LARCH-412 3-0-3

LA Tech: Urban Hydrology

Urban hydrology examines sustainable water resource issues as they relate to landscape planning and site planning and design within the urban or urbanizing context. This includes the theory and techniques associated with soil and water conservation and comprehension of the why, when and where that leads to sustainable planning or design strategies. Topics include surface water hydrology, stormwater runoff estimation, sustainable stormwater management techniques, watershed planning, flood routing and impact mitigation, and erosion and sedimentation control tools and regulations.

Prerequisite: LARCH-303


LARCH-506 3-0-3

Professional Practice for Landscape Architecture

Professional Management for Landscape Architecture introduces the ethical, legal, and administrative issues and procedures encountered in numerous forms within landscape architecture practice. Topics include: types of practice, project management, the ethical and legal frameworks in which professional landscape architecture practice occurs, contractual documents, proposal preparation and fee structuring. The preparation of an effective resume and portfolio concludes the course.

Prerequisite: LARCH-401


LARCH-507 3-0-3

Cultural and Landscape Preservation

This course covers theories and practices of historic and cultural preservation as a component of a more comprehensive framework for environmental and resource management. Students study the importance of designating historic districts, buildings and landscapes, as well as accomplishing preservation goals, within the existing regulatory environment. Also covered are interpretive methodologies for understanding current cultural and social patterns and practices in the landscape, with an emphasis on sustainability. Prerequisites: LARCH-306 or ARCH-421


LARCH-513 2-2-3

LA Tech: Construction Documents

This is the final course of the construction technology series. The major emphasis is the preparation of a complete set of technical construction documents with specifications, sustainable practices, and cost estimates. Specific topics include: site demolition, layout and dimensioning, and specification writing.

Co-requisite: LARCH- 301 and LARCH-302


LARCH-515 2-2-3

Advanced GIS for Landscape Analysis

This is an advanced course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students continue their studies in GIS applications appropriate to landscape analyses. GIS is an increasingly important tool for organizing digital spatial data in an accessible and logical manner for site design, recreation master planning, visual analysis, comprehensive planning, resource management and public advocacy.

Prerequisite: LARCH-310


LARCH-521 3-0-3

Environmental Policy

Environmental problems are essentially social, economic and political problems. This course initially traces the evolution of United States environmental policy, legislation and regulations, including the background and context of environmental policymaking; the substantive problems and political process of environmental movements; and contemporary environmental thought with regard to issu


LARCH-591 3-0-3

Capstone Preparation

In this writing-intensive seminar, students are introduced to qualitative research methods through lectures, discussions and assignments intended to promote independent methods of research and design inquiry. Students are to develop a well-articulated, conceptual framework for their individual capstone design project that includes their research topic, method of analysis, a literature review, case studies and detailed work plan.

Prerequisites: LARCH- 400 and LARCH-402


LARCH-599 0-12-6

LA Design 8: Individual Capstone Project

This course is the last in a series of studios specific to the landscape architecture program curriculum. Students work independently and select their own Capstone Project topic. The Capstone Project requires individual research, inventory and analysis, programming, and design concept development through final design.

Prerequisites: LARCH-591 and grade of C or better in LARCH-401




LAW-1013-0-3

Introduction to Law and Society

An interdisciplinary introduction to legal systems and the law. Laws are created by social and cultural systems and affected by social, economic and political environments. This course will help students understand the development and impact of legal systems through case studies of many current legal issues and debates. There will also be an introduction to international comparisons.


LAW-103 3-0-3

Crime and Justice

This course provides an introduction to criminal justice in America. Students will examine the criminal justice system and process in the social context of justice and democratic society. They will study the police and criminal courts as political institutions that make decisions with an eye to the press and popular opinion as well as to race, class and justice.


LAW-105 3-0-3

American Government

This course provides an introduction to law and American government in action. In the course students will investigate the structures and processes of American government and the relationships between the three branches of government within the context of how public policy is made and implemented.


LAW-201 3-0-3

Constitutional Law and the Supreme Court

This course provides an examination of the sources, growth, development, and interpretation of the United States Constitution. It also examines the role of the Supreme Court in addressing issues of constitutionality, and considers key cases, historically and currently.


LAW-203 3-0-3

Comparative Legal Systems

This course provides an introduction to comparative law, and how different legal systems approach the law, legal analysis and legal culture. This course provides an examination of comparative legal systems, which consist of legal processes, institutions and culture, through a series of thematic comparative case studies. It also examines the role of dispute resolution processes in different legal cultures; addresses issues of civil, criminal and administrative law; and considers key cases, historically and currently.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101


LAW-205 3-0-3

Philadelphia Law and Politics

This course provides a critical introduction to local law and politics. This course will focus on social change in cities, focusing on Philadelphia, in the context of structural urban problems. It provides an examination of the Philadelphia legal and political system by having students learn about processes, institutions and culture, through readings and real world experiences in and around the city of Philadelphia. Students will experience local law and politics through readings and discussions as well as by interacting with members of the legal and political community.

Prerequisites: WRTG-101 & HIST-1XX


LAW-300 3-0-3

International Law

This course provides an introduction to the international law system that examines the rules binding the international conduct of states and non-state actors. The course covers topics related to the sources and functions of international law, and related issues of jurisdiction and standing. It also focuses on international institutions, and specific issues in international law such as the rules of warfare and peacekeeping; human rights; international trade and communication.

Prerequisites: LAW-101; WRTG-2XX


LAW-302 3-0-3

Law and Ethics

(writing intensive)

This course examines the intersection between ethical issues and law in the context of the United States. The course will consider contemporary cases that illustrate the intersection of contemporary legal and ethical issues. There will be a service-learning component to this class.

Prerequisites: LAW-101; WRTG-2XX


LAW-304 3-0-3

Law, Media, and Society

This course examines the dynamic interactions between law, technology and media and how they affect a variety of global social and legal issues, including the democratic process, civil rights, and how individuals relate to each other legally, socially, economically, and sexually.

Prerequisite: SOC-2XX


LAW-306 3-0-3

Legal Research, Writing, and Moot Court

(writing intensive)

This course will introduce students to the basics tenets of legal research, writing and persuasive arguing by way of a moot court appellate competition focusing on current controversial topics that affect both American law and society.

Prerequisites: LAW-101; WRTG-2XX


LAW-308 3-0-3

Law, Women and Gender This course will examine how the courts and the democratic process have confronted issues of civil rights in the area of law and gender. Using court cases and legislative acts, students will study: (1) The historical denial of basic civil rights to women; (2) Gender discrimination and the law’s efforts combat this discrimination; (3) Abortion rights; (4) Same-sex marriage, and (5) Violence against women and sexual assault. Students will learn how the law affects gender discrimination and analyze how well the law allows us to challenge discrimination.

Prerequisites: WRTG-2xx


LAW-411 3-0-3

Senior Seminar in the First Amendment

This course examines the first amendment rights of speech, press and association, and focuses on landmark Supreme Court rulings and scholarly commentary. The course will provide students with skills to critically interpret the First Amendment and apply lessons learned to their own lives. It will cover such issues as libel law, obscenity, symbolic speech, and freedom of the press and freedom of association.

Prerequisites: LAW 201; LAW-302; LAW-306


LAW-499 1-2-3

Senior Capstone: Public Policy Advocacy

(writing intensive)

This capstone course for the Law and Society major combines a classroom seminar (50 minutes per week) on advocacy skills with a real-world public policy advocacy project within either a self-selected pre-existing organization or an initiative of the student’s own creation and design. Students will also receive 100 minutes of designated instruction time, via the web, during which their E-Reports will be reviewed and the status of their projects will be discussed. Students will review and integrate the skills and knowledge they developed during previous courses in the Law and Society curriculum while also applying the principles of public policy theory and oral and written advocacy to the student’s selected project.

Prerequisites: LAW-411 (Senior Seminar)


Mathematics

The College Studies curriculum requires every Philadelphia University graduate to complete a mathematics education that includes differential and integral calculus, to ensure that our graduates have developed quantitative reasoning skills that strengthen their critical thinking abilities. To fulfill this core curriculum requirement, students must complete the highest calculus course for which they are qualified, up to Calculus I.

The specific course sequence will be determined by the student’s major and the level of mathematics with which the student enters the University as demonstrated by previous coursework and/or placement testing. The two-course sequences are:

MATH-100/1 (L130/13)1: Finite Math

MATH-103 (L132): Intro. to Calculus

or

MATH-102 (L135): Pre-Calculus

MATH-103 (L132): Intro. to Calculus

or

MATH-102 (L135): Pre-Calculus &

MATH-111 (L141): Calculus I

or

MATH-103 (L132): Intro. to Calculus

and one Free Elective

or

MATH-111 (L141): Calculus I

and one Free Elective


MATH-099 (Formerly M99) 3-2-(3)

Fundamentals of College Mathematics

This course covers those topics in arithmetic and algebra that are essential to further work involving mathematics. Students will study fractions, decimals and percentages, signed numbers, linear and quadratic equations, exponents and scientific notation, factoring, techniques of graphing, equations of straight lines and linear systems of equations. There will be an emphasis on applications. Use of the scientific calculator will be discussed. Credits earned may not be applied toward graduation requirements. Students must earn a “C” or better to receive credit for fundamentals courses. See “Fundamentals Courses” in the section “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Students required to take MATH-099 must pass the course before taking CHEM 103, Chemistry I.


MATH-100 (Formerly L130) 3-2-3

Finite Mathematics

While the content of MATH-100 is identical to that of MATH-101, more time is devoted during the semester to the review and use of elementary mathematical operations. See MATH-101 for content.


MATH-101 (Formerly L131) 3-0-3

Finite Mathematics

An introduction to the concept of a mathematical model, with special emphasis on using functions to model problems in business and economics. The functions and their graphs that are studied (needed for MATH-103) include polynomials (esp. linear and quadratic), rationals, exponentials and logarithms. Applications are made to finance, including annuities. In addition, simultaneous linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrix algebra and linear programming are covered.


MATH-102 (Formerly L135) 3-0-3

Pre-Calculus

The fundamentals of college algebra, analytic geometry and trigonometry will be covered, with particular emphasis on those topics necessary for the calculus sequence.


MATH-103 (Formerly L132) 3-0-3

Introduction to Calculus

Students will be taught an introduction to the differential and integral calculus of polynomials, rational functions, exponentials and logarithms. Emphasis is placed on the use of calculus in the study of rate of change, determination of extrema and area under the curve. Not for Science majors.

Prerequisite: MATH-100 or MATH-101 or MATH-102


MATH 110 4-2-4

Pre-Calculus for Science and Engineers

This course provides a background for students preparing to take Calculus I (MATH 111), and subsequent courses in Physics, Engineering and Science that require knowledge of calculus. Students are exposed to a wide variety of mathematical concepts and applications in problem solving. Concepts covered include Equations and Inequalities, Functions and Their Graphs, Polynomial and Rational Functions, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, Trigonometric Functions of Angles, Trigonometric Functions of Real Numbers, Analytic Trigonometry, Vectors, the Complex Plane, and Polar Coordinates, Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities, Conics, Systems of Nonlinear Equations and Inequalities, and Parametric Equations, Sequences and Series.


MATH-111 (Formerly L141) 4-0-4

Calculus I

Functions, slope and rate of change, limits, derivations of algebraic functions, maxima and minima applications, indefinite integration, integration by substitution, sigma notation, area between two curves are taught. Knowledge of algebra, geometry and trigonometric functions is assumed.


MATH-112 (Formerly L142) 4-0-4

Calculus II

Students will study differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, theory and methods of integration and applications, infinite series, convergent tests, Maclaurin and Taylor series. Convergence of Taylor series.

Prerequisite: MATH-111


MATH-213 (Formerly M113) 4-0-4

Calculus III

Students will study analytic geometry in 3D-space; algebra of vectors, differentiation and integration of vectors; partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and infinite series.

Prerequisite: MATH-112


MATH-214 (Formerly M121) 3-0-3

Linear Algebra

Students will study the theory and solution techniques for systems of linear equations; vectors, matrices, determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; vector spaces, and linear transformations.

Prerequisite: MATH-112


MATH-225 (Formerly M122) 3-0-3

Differential Equations

Students will study first-order equations; constant-coefficient, nth-order homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations; special non-linear equations; elementary applications; and power series solutions. The course may also include elementary numerical techniques for solutions of ordinary differential equations and other computer topics.

Prerequisite: MATH-213


MATH-316 (Formerly M125) 3-0-3

Partial Differential Equations

The course will focus on how modeling physical phenomena leads to partial differential equations; the heat conduction, wave propagation and potential equations; classification of linear second-order equations; boundary-value problems; Fourier series; separation of variables and special functions.

Prerequisite: MATH-225


MATH-317 (Formerly M171) 3-0-3

Real Variables

Students will study topics related to functions of a real variable, including measure and integration; differentiation; abstract spaces; general measure and integration theory.

Prerequisite: MATH-225


MATH-318 (Formerly M173) 3-0-3

Complex Variables

Students will study analytical functions; Cauchy-Riemann equations; power series; infinite series; calculus of residues; contour integration; and conformal mapping.

Prerequisite: MATH-225


MATH-321 (Formerly M141) 3-0-3

Probability and Statistics

Students will study the fundamentals of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisite: MATH-112


MATH-323 (Formerly M143) 3-0-3

Mathematical Statistics

This course is designed to give the student some of the background needed to pursue more advanced courses that use statistical techniques. The content of the course will include topics from probability theory that are necessary for an understanding of the mathematical foundations of statistics. These topics will include: probability distributions, likelihood functions, properties of expectation operators, moment-generating functions, the central-limit theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. The student will be expected to be familiar with the topics of calculus through multiple integrals.

Prerequisite: MATH-321


MATH-326 (Formerly M163) 3-0-3

Modern Algebra

Study of sets and mappings; group, ring and field theory; homomorphisms and isomorphisms; Lagrange’s theorem; abelian and cyclic groups; symmetric groups; polynomial rings.

Prerequisite: MATH-214


MATH-331 (Formerly M131) 3-0-3

Mathematical Methods in Chemistry, Physics and Engineering

This is an advanced course covering topics chosen from the following: matrix algebra, Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville systems, boundary-value problems for ordinary differential equations, Laplace’s equation, introduction to Bessel’s equation and Bessel functions.

Prerequisite: MATH-225


MENGR-3013-2-3

Machine Design

Students will study kinematics and dynamics of machinery, including analytical kinematics, force analysis, cam design and balancing, and the application of elementary mechanics of solids to analyze and size machine components for stress and deflection. Introduction to finite element analysis with emphasis on beam and plate models will be taught.

Prerequisite: ENGR-218


MENGR-325 3-0-3

Engineering Vibrations

Vibrations will be a thorough treatment of vibration theory and its engineering applications, from simple degree to multi degree-of-freedom system. Topics will include harmonic excitation, forced responses, multiple degree-of-freedom systems, design for vibration suppression, distributed parameter systems, vibration testing and experimental modal analysis, and finite element method.

Prerequisites: ENGR-218


MENGR-405 3-1-3

Introduction to Mechatronics

This course will prepare students in the interdisciplinary field of engineering that comprises the integration of mechanics, electronics and computer technology coordinated by control architecture. Emphasis on computer-integrated electromechanical systems will help the students to understand the design, analysis and practical approach of system integration.

Prerequisite: ENGR 322


MENGR-407 3-0-3

Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer I

This course considers fundamental laws governing the transformation of heat into mechanical energy. Properties of gases and vapors and the processes between states are explored as are applications of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. A study of the transfer of heat by conduction, convection and radiation in steady and unsteady flow is also conducted.

Prerequisite: MATH-112, PHYS-201, PHYS-201L


MENGR-427 3-0-3

System Dynamics and Controls

Students will study modeling of physical systems including electromechanical systems; reduction of block diagrams; signal flow graphs and Mason’s gain formula; response of second order systems: natural frequency and damping ratio and how they relate to risk-time, peak-time, settling-time, and overshoot; stability and the Routh-Hurwitz criterion; steady-state error and sensitivity; root locus; and Design of cascade compensators using root locus and frequency response.

Prerequisite: IENGR-311, ENGR-218


MENGR-428 3-0-3

Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer II

This course covers energy analysis; vapor and gas power cycles; vapor and gas refrigeration cycles; thermodynamic properties of mixtures and solutions; psychrometry and air-conditioning; reacting mixtures and combustion.

Prerequisite: MENGR 407

MGMT-104 1.5-0-1.5

Management Foundations

Designed for majors in C-DEC, this course enables students to understand the role of managers in diverse, global, and competitive organizations, and within the context of 21st Century management theory. Topics include decision-making, motivation, leadership, human resources, ethics and social responsibility, and management in a global environment. Students will explore these topics through assignments and exercises designed to enhance their managerial skills.


MGMT-301 (Formerly B123) 3-0-3

Principles of Management

Effective management is fundamental for the successful operation of all types of enterprises. The course will present the principles, techniques and concepts needed for managerial analysis and decision making. Functions highlighted include planning, organizing, staffing and controlling.


MGMT-303 3-0-3

Logistics in East Asia

Given the global nature of the world of logistics, today’s students must have a grasp of the political, social and culture factors that contribute to forming a successful consumer products strategy. A student’s understanding of geo-political structure will allow them to explore logistic strategies, learn the key steps of the analytical process used to help grow a global value chain, learn to define measurable objectives and develop strategies to promote logistic efficiencies.

Prerequisite: MGMT-301or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only)


MGMT-305 (Formerly B148) 3-0-3

Apparel/Textile Brand Management

Brand building is an essential strategy for all successful companies in the apparel supply chain. Classroom instruction will focus on the techniques of brand growth. Case studies will be used as the foundation for a research project.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or MKTG 104 (for DEC students only)


MGMT-307 (Formerly B168) 3-0-3

International Management

Introduces students to the special aspects of managing a company in the global environment. Issues involved in understanding and applying the international and cross-cultural dimensions of the traditional management functions, such as organization, control, motivation, human resources and labor relations; and organization theory are studied. Lectures, readings, exercises and cases will be used.

Prerequisite: MGMT-301or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only)


MGMT-309 (Formerly B135) 3-0-3

Systems Analysis

This course introduces the structured approach to design of new applications software, software systems, networks and/or World Wide Web installations. It deals with the usual life cycle for such operations. Analysis includes approaches to specifying input and output, file structures, trade-off techniques, implementation, documentation and testing. Other approaches such as rapid application development and object-oriented analysis are discussed.

Prerequisite: MIS-202


MGMT-310 (Formerly B160) 3-0-3

People and Teams in Organizations

The course includes an in-depth exploration of topics such as communication, group dynamics, group roles, team building, power and politics, leadership and negotiation and conflict resolution. In addition, issues of organizational culture and diversity are examined. Through readings, discussions, class activities and projects, students learn how to be effective organizational communicators, team members and leaders. Students also gain an understanding of culture and diversity issues and how to effectively manage them.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or (MGMT 104, DECPROC 101, DECFRM 200)


MGMT-311 (Formerly B176) 3-0-3

Colloquium in Management

Consideration of selected relevant issues in management and society that are of serious interest to students and faculty, such as technology of the future, impact of data banks, management and public policy, planning systems, education and human resources will be discussed.

Prerequisites: senior status, faculty recommendation and 3.5 or better G.P.A.


MGMT-315 (Formerly B165) 3-0-3

Communications, Negotiations, and the Creative Economy

This is a course in organizational politics — power, influence, conflict and conflict management. It has two goals: first, to develop students’ skills in recognizing politics and conflict situations; and second, to teach students to use negotiating to achieve personal organizational goals. Through readings, discussion and role-plays, a wide range of conflict and negotiating contexts will be considered. These include situations in interpersonal, interorganizational and union-management relationships.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or (MGMT 104, DECPROC 101, DECFRM 200)


MGMT-316 (Formerly B184) 3-0-3

Health Services Management

An analysis of the managerial process as it relates to the planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling of health care services. The techniques of effective decision making and problem solving are addressed. A systems orientation, as it applies to the health care services organization, forms the theoretical basis of the course. Only available in the evening.

Note: For students in the B.S. for Health Services Management program. This course replaces MGMT-301 Principles of Management or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only) as a prerequisite for subsequent courses.


MGMT-320 (Formerly B162) 3-0-3

Human Resource Practices and Tools

This course surveys the roles, policies and procedures of human resource management (HRM) in organizations today. Students learn the steps to staff and motivate a workforce and appreciate the role of quantitative and qualitative decision making in HRM. Course materials deal with environmental impacts on HRM, equal employment opportunity, human resource planning, selection, performance evaluation, wage and salary administration, training and other relevant topics.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or (MGMT 104, DECPROC 101, DECFRM 200)


MGMT-326 (Formerly B144) 3-0-3

Total Quality Management Solving Methods

The principles of Total Quality Management (TQM) are becoming the standards of practice for businesses. This course explores the history of TQM and the principles of Deming and the other major contributors to current TQM practices. How businesses use TQM principles to improve processes, products and services, involve all employees and gain a competitive edge will be studied. The application of TQM to a variety of industries will be explored.

Prerequisites: MATH-321 or STAT-201; MGMT-301 or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only); MKTG-102 or MKTG 104 (for DEC students only); pre- or coregistration in MATH-321 or STAT-201


MGMT-327 (Formerly B187) 3-0-3

Emerging Issues in Health Care

The purpose of this course is to explore the current trends in health care and issues affecting the organizational changes in the industry with regard to delivery of health care services in a wide variety of settings. Topics will include history of U.S. health care, current reform proposals, universal health care insurance, ethical issues, gerontological issues, labor relations and the changing workforce in health care and comparative perspectives of health care delivery in other countries. Only available in the evening.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only) or MGMT-316, junior status


MGMT-331 (Formerly B147) 3-0-3

Compensation and Benefits

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of the concepts, components and activities related to designing, implementing and administering a compensation and benefits program. The compensation policies of internal consistency, external competitiveness, employee contribution and plan administration will be examined in detail. Techniques explored are job analysis, job description, job evaluation, market surveying, pay policy-line derivation, incentive programs, planning and budgetary controls. Only available in the evening.

Prerequisite: MGMT-301or MGMT 104(for DEC students only)


MGMT-381 (Formerly B199) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Management

Students will complete intensive independent study of a chosen subject. The student is expected to read a substantial number of major works in the field and to prepare a critical documented paper. See also the statement on Independent Study under ““University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Prerequisites: permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


MGMT-401 (Formerly B141) 3-0-3

Operations Management

This course is a comprehensive survey of production and service operations management, topics and functions. Topics include methods and work measurement, materials management, plant location and layout, production planning and control, maintenance, quality control, “Total Quality,” Japanese management styles, “Systems Approach;” and decision tools such as PERT, linear programming, queuing theory, sampling and simulation. Service-delivery applications and activities are also highlighted.

Prerequisites: STAT-202; MGMT-301 or (MGMT-104, DECPROC 101, DECFRM 200)


MGMT-405 (Formerly B149) 3-2-4

Apparel/Textile Supply Chain Management

This course will bring into sharp focus the global relationship that exists between all of the elements of the textile-apparel-retail supply chain. Areas covered include traditional management functions of control over timeliness of production, and quality and labor relations in the global marketplace.

Prerequisite: FASHMGT-401


MGMT-411 (Formerly B170) 3-0-3

Entrepreneurship Seminar

The student assumes the role of the initiator and manager of a firm. Emphasis is on the required planning prior to the inception of operations and entrepreneurial problems in achieving cash-flow equilibrium. Each student is required to prepare a formal business plan. Interdisciplinary concepts are studied. May be used as a management elective.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or (MGMT 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200), MKTG-102 or (MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MGMT-412 (Formerly B172) 3-0-3

Seminar: Leading Organizational Innovation and Social Responsibility

This course is designed for senior management majors and integrates and extends concepts learned in other upper-level management courses. The dynamic nature of management is emphasized through reading, analyzing and discussing recent literature in terms of the current business environment. Students examine topics including 21st-century career management; the role of education and technology in organizations; and future trends in management and organizations. The course includes individual and group readings, cases, and research projects that are presented as written and oral assignments.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or (MGMT 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MGMT-413 (Formerly B186) 3-0-3

Health Services Management Seminar

This course will examine advanced topics in health-services management. An atmosphere for shared learning is promoted by individual and group research in substantive areas relevant to the health-services industry. This course is only available in the evening.

Prerequisites: MGMT-428, MGMT-316


MGMT-416 (Formerly B145) 3-0-3

Training and Development

A course designed to provide students interested in the field of human resources with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the processes of learning, training and development, and their applications in business and industry. Students will learn adult-learning theories, identification of training and program needs, and program design and evaluation. The course includes participative lectures and discussion, media techniques, case studies, role-play, team-building/group activities, games and simulations and instruction methodology. This course is only available in the evening.

Prerequisite: MGMT-320


MGMT-418 (Formerly B161) 3-0-3

Industrial Relations

This course investigates union-management relations in both private and public sectors. Students develop an understanding of the industrial-relations systems in the United States, including past and current changes, union and management responses to changes and the future of union-management relations. Students learn to appreciate bargaining, and increase their negotiating skills through discussing and applying collective-bargaining and other dispute-resolution techniques in a negotiation simulation.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only), junior status


MGMT-419 (Formerly B179) 3-0-3

Diversity Management

This course focuses on managing a diverse workforce and how organizations can change systems, structures and practices to eliminate barriers that keep diverse workforces and organizations from reaching full potential. The course examines research and practice in diversity management on topics including interpersonal skills, training, evaluation, managerial practices, recruiting, retention, benefits and compensation. This course may not be taken if student completed as a special topics course, MGMT-311.

Prerequisite: MGMT-301 or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only)


MGMT-428 (Formerly B183) 3-0-3

Health Services Delivery System

This course will provide an overview of the history, evolution and major components of U.S. health care systems. Systems theory will form the basis for this course. Topics covered will include the organization of health care services, the hospital, the physician, supply and demand in health care, third-party payers, the role of government, managed care and comparisons of health care systems in other countries. This course is only available in the evening.


MGMT-490N (Formerly MGMT-490, B171) 3-0-6

Business Policy and Strategy

(writing intensive)

The process and techniques of strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation are studied and applied. Case studies of domestic and international companies and not-for-profit organizations are used to integrate strategic management concepts with knowledge acquired in other functional area courses. Includes extensive written individual and team assignments and oral presentations. Students taking this course cannot take MGMT-491 for credit.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or MGMT 104, MKTG-102 or MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200, DECSYS-2xx, DECMTHD-300, FINC-301


MGMT-491N (Formerly MGMT-491, B180) 3-0-6

Textile, Retail and Apparel Business Policy and Strategy

(writing intensive)

The process and techniques of strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation are studied and applied as they pertain to the textile, apparel and retail industries. Case studies of domestic and international companies are used to integrate strategic-management concepts with knowledge acquired in other functional area courses. Includes extensive written individual and team assignments and oral presentations. Students taking this course cannot take MGMT-490 for credit.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or MGMT 104, MKTG-104 or MKTG-102, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200, DECSYS-2XX, DECMTHD-300, FINC-301, FASHMGMT-101


MIS-202 (Formerly IS16)3-0-3

Management Information Systems

This course is designed for future managerial end users of e-business information systems who will both use and manage information technology (IT). The course addresses the strategic, tactical and operational uses of IT in business for problem solving. Frequent computer assignments will complement the topics discussed in class as the student develops more sophisticated skills in databases design, implementing queries and reports, exporting data to spreadsheets and using spreadsheets and graphics to model businesses for decision making.

Prerequisite: INFO-101


MKTG-102 (Formerly B221)3-0-3

Principles of Marketing

This is a basic course in which the main functions, institutions and concepts of marketing are studied. Attention is focused on providing an analytical and corporate framework for studying and understanding the marketing system within changing environmental forces.


MKTG-104 1.5-0-1.5

Marketing Foundations

This is a basic course in which the main functions, institutions and concepts of marketing are studied. Attention is focused on providing an analytical and corporate framework for studying and understanding the marketing system within changing environmental forces.


MKTG-115 (Formerly B235) 3-0-3

Fashion Merchandising

This course provides students with a general understanding of Fashion Merchandising and is designed to help students to become familiar with the fashion business and its “industries.” It discusses the men’s, women’s and children’s wear and home furnishings and their interrelationships. This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historical and economic features as a central theme.


MKTG-207 (Formerly B231) 3-0-3

Consumer in the Market Place

This course provides comprehensive understanding of the many dimensions of consumer behavior and the contributions of behavioral science to marketing. The focus will be on understanding consumer needs.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or (MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MKTG-217 (Formerly B241) 3-0-3

Retailing Strategy and Structure

Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of retail strategy in the dynamic retailing environment. Special attention is given to retailing structure since it underlies the strategic decision making of retailing management.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or (MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MKTG-302 (Formerly B237) 3-0-3

Product Development and Innovation

This course is designed to expose students to the concept of innovation and an understanding of the process of product/service development and innovative marketing. Students learn how a product is conceptualized and ultimately commercialized. They will understand the factors that play a central role in the process.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or (MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MKTG-310 (Formerly B240) 3-0-3

Integrated Marketing Communications

This course examines the vital role of marketing communications in the development of marketing strategy. Integrated marketing communications (IMC) is emphasized as students explore the use of advertising, personal selling, sales promotions, Internet marketing, database marketing, public relations, and more to enhance brand equity. The strategy and planning involved in the development of integrated campaigns is emphasized.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or (MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MKTG-315 (Formerly B233) 3-0-3

Marketing in a Digital Environment

This course investigates the ways in which new technologies are changing the field of marketing. Major topics include Internet advertising, database marketing, sales-force automation and customer relationship-management software tools. Other topics include the impact of new technologies on distribution strategies, online pricing models, mass-customization strategies, data mining and media implications.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or (MKTG 104, DECPROC-101, DECFRM-200)


MKTG-318 (Formerly B243) 3-0-3

Sales Management

Sales management is the planning, direction and control of the selling activities of a business. Topics include recruiting, selecting, training, equipping, assigning, routing, supervising, compensating and motivating the sales force. This course focuses on business-to-business marketing.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or MKTG 104 (for DEC students only)


MKTG-324 (Formerly B244) 3-0-3

International Marketing

This course is an investigation of the marketing concept in a global environment. Marketing practices through which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems and planning and organizing for export-import operations.

Prerequisite: MKTG-102 or MKTG 104 (for DEC students only)


MKTG-328 (Formerly B251) 3-0-3

Merchandise Buying/Operations

The course provides the student with the understanding of the interdependence of the merchandising and operations functions. Students have a comprehensive understanding of the retail business from gross sales to net profit. To achieve this understanding, students are required to prepare a merchandising/operations plan that integrates all of the elements of doing business in the retail environment.

Prerequisites: MKTG-217


MKTG-381 (Formerly B299) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Marketing

Intensive independent study of a chosen subject. The student is expected to read a substantial number of major works in the field and to prepare a critical, documented paper. See “Independent Study” under ““University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Prerequisites: permission required. See appropriate form online on the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


MKTG-391 (Formerly B261) 3-0-3

Marketing Research

This course exposes students to marketing-research techniques and procedures used in gathering, recording, analyzing and reporting of data related to marketing problems.

Prerequisites: MKTG-207, STAT-202


MKTG-408 (Formerly B303) 3-0-3

Survey of E-Commerce

This is an introductory course in which the size, scope and impact of e-commerce is explored. This course includes discussions about how technology impacts business processes and transactions. A significant part of the course will discuss the e-business technology platform. Additional topics include business-to-business market exchanges, online auctions, electronic-payment systems, market valuation of e-commerce firms, and government policies and issues concerning e-commerce such as privacy, regulations and ethics.


MKTG-412 (Formerly B262) 3-0-3

Marketing Strategy Seminar

Skills will be developed for making better decisions by learning to integrate various topics of marketing. The importance and know-how of anticipating, recognizing and adapting to external forces on the decision-making process and organization will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on incorporating the most recent literature, which is of theoretical and practical importance, in the decision-making process. The course is built around readings, marketing cases, research papers and problem sets. A comprehensive marketing plan will be developed.

Prerequisites: MKTG-310, MKTG-391


MKTG-413 (Formerly B333) 2-2-3

E-Site Design

E-Site Design is an introductory web design course. Students explore fundamental concepts of website design and learn how to develop, post and maintain a website using popular software. Emphasis is on mastering basic website design and management skills for business applications that exceed a rudimentary knowledge of the techniques offered by application software packages. The student will engage in hands-on computer experience in the computer labs.

Note: for Graphic Design or Interactive Design and Media majors only.

Prerequisite: permission of the director of Graphic Design Communication.


Physician Assistant Studies

Note: All of the below listed PAS courses, with the exception of PAS-400, are restricted to students matriculated in the Physician Assistant Studies Program.


PAS-4001-0-1

Medical Terminology

This competency-based course covers the structure, definition and utilization of basic medical terminology for students entering the health professions. The course is designed for students with some health care experience. Independent reading, workbook exercises, case studies and interactive computer software are the learning modalities used in this experience.


PAS-407A & B/PASF-507 A & B GR 3-4-5

Advanced Anatomy

This lecture and laboratory course will review basic histology along with the major anatomical structures of the human using a regional organization. Laboratory sessions utilizing microscopic examination, models and cadaver specimen dissection will augment lecture material.

Prerequisite: BIOL-202 and BIOL-202L


PAS-410/PASF-510 GR 2-0-2

Medical and Professional Ethics

Understanding the philosophical principles related to biomedical ethics, patient-practitioner relationships and the role of the physician assistant provider within the health care system are the main topics encompassed in this lecture and discussion seminar course.


PAS-411/PASF-511 GR 3-0-3

Applied Behavioral Science

The topics of developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, human sexuality, stress responses, behaviors related to psychological health and illness and the diagnosis and management of common psychological disorders are the focus of this lecture course.


PAS-413/PASF-513 GR 3-0-3

Medical Physiology and Pathophysiology

This lecture course is designed to teach the principles of human medical physiology along with the physiological mechanisms of common disease states.

Prerequisites: BIOL-202 and BIOL-202L, BIOL-221 and BIOL-221L


PAS-417/PASF-517 GR 4-2-5

Medical History and Physical Diagnosis

This lecture and practical laboratory course will introduce the physician assistant student to the techniques for eliciting a medical history and performing a complete physical examination on humans. The interpretation of history and physical examination findings as applicable to physiological and disease states will also be discussed. Laboratory sessions, hospital experiences and writing assignments will enhance the learning experience.


PAS-421/PASF-521 GR 2-0-2

Medical Genetics and Microbiology

This lecture course presents current concepts and issues in medical genetics, immunology and microbiology. It focuses on diseases of genetic origin, the function of the immune system and emerging trends in disorders caused by microorganisms.

Prerequisite: BIOL-221 and BIOL-221L


PE-000-1-0.5

Varsity Athlete

Students who have participated on one of the University’s 16 intercollegiate sports teams for one season will satisfy the requirement for this course. Students must register for this course in the semester they expect to receive the course credit. Students may register for this course two times.


PE-020-1-0.5

Recreation and Wellness

Students participate in 15 or more hours of recreation and wellness activities offered through the Department of Athletics. Opportunities include participation in intramural sports, recreational courses in team and individual sports, and wellness courses such as yoga, stress management, and tailored exercise programs. All activities must be validated by a representative from the Department of Athletics to earn credit. Students must register for the course at the beginning of the semester to receive course credit. Students cannot register for PE-02 twice in the same semester. See Undergraduate Academic Programs section.


PHOTO-101 (Formerly PHOTO-111 and H323)2-3-3

Introduction to Photography: Black and White

This course introduces the technical aspects and controls of a manual 35mm camera together with silver-based black & white film developing and printing methods. Students will develop a fundamental vocabulary for constructive critique of photographs and will generate a photographic portfolio piece, exploring a subject of interest.


PHOTO-102 (Formerly DIGD-310 and D627) 2-2-3

Introduction to Photography: Digital

This course is an introduction to the conceptual and technical aspects of digital photography through projects, presentations, critiques and lectures based on both classical and constructed methods of image creation. Topics include: basic camera functions, importing files from digital media, color management, image improvement and manipulation using Adobe Photoshop, Bridge, and Light Room and preparing final images for print and/or screen presentation.


PHOTO-201 (Formerly PHOTO-301 and G622) 2-2-3

Studio Photography

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of photographic image making within the controlled environment of the studio. Emphasis is given to lighting techniques using professional strobe equipment; single-lens reflex digital capture on the computer, software for capturing digital photographs, as well as the role of props and setting in the generation of portraiture, fashion and still-life images.

PHOTO-204 (Formerly GRAPH-204 and G621) 1-5-3

Introduction to Photography for Graphic Design Communication

Required for Graphic Design Communication majors, this course focuses upon photography as a tool for graphic designers. Students are introduced to: film and digital camera use, exposure, image processing, and printing; table-top set-ups with professional studio lighting equipment; and digital documentation of work for portfolios.

Prerequisite: DSGNFND-203 or permission of the director of the Graphic Design Communication program


PHOTO-302 (Formerly ARCH-411 and A605) 2-2-3

Architectural Photography

In this course students acquire the skills to apply a documentary methodology to thematic explorations of subject matter, specifically related to architecture and the built environment, interiors and cultural landscapes. Students learn to critique photographs of buildings and spaces and to produce high-quality black and white prints.


PHOTO-303 (Formerly ARCH-305) 2-2-3

Introduction to the View Camera: A Survey of Historical and Contemporary Techniques

This course covers the fundamentals of view camera photography by utilizing the 4x5 large-format camera. Through exploration of traditional view camera subjects architecture, landscape, still life and portraiture students learn view camera movements, exposure, sheet film processing, color film use, film scanning, and large scale inkjet printing. Historical printing processes, including salted paper, calotype, cyanotype, tintype and platinum/palladium, are examined as a complement to contemporary methods. Emphasis is placed on the view camera as a tool for documentation, narration and expression supplements consideration of the mediums technical aspects.


PHOTO-307 (Formerly ARCH-307) 3-0-3

History of Photography

(writing intensive)

Since its invention in 1839, photography has played a pivotal role in the formation of modern visual culture. Focusing upon chronological, thematic and technological developments, this course investigates the diverse expressions and applications of the photographic image within a nexus of philosophical, social, economic, scientific and aesthetic contexts. Particular emphasis is placed upon: debates concerning the nature and function of images; the medium’s impact upon portraiture, high art, popular culture, fashion and social documentation; and the rise of photojournalism and advertising. Photography as a discrete language of signs, symbols and metaphors with implied narratives is emphasized.

Prerequisite: WRTG-2XX


PHOTO-381 (Formerly G993) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Photography

Independent Study in Photography is a one term student-initiated project limited to those students who have finished the full sequence of photography courses. A student proposes a project and works independently with guidance from the instructor. See “Independent Study” in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Prerequisite: Permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


PHOTO-436 (Formerly ARCH-436) 2-2-3

Historic Preservation Documentation: Photography

Begun in 1933, the Historic American Building Survey (HABS) is the first federal preservation program established to document America’s architectural heritage. In this course students learn the fundamentals of HABS documentation methods for the production of archival records of historic structures and places, utilizing the 4 x 5 large-format camera. Through field work and labs, students photograph, print, research and narrate comprehensive, technically proficient photographic essays that represent the salient aspects of historic structures, complexes and sites in accordance with HABS standards.


PHYS-101 (Formerly L313)3-2-3

General Physics

(for non-science majors)

The basic laws of mechanics and thermodynamics are covered. The emphasis will be on understanding the major laws of physics and the way they manifest themselves in practical applications and in laboratory experiments. The areas of importance for architecture and interior design, such as sound and illumination, are discussed.

Prerequisite: MATH-100 or MATH-101 or MATH-102 or MATH-103 or MATH-111

PHYS-201 (Formerly L325)3-0-3

Physics I: Mechanics and Heat

(required for science and Engineering majors)

A calculus-based course emphasizing Newton’s three laws of motion and the conservation laws of energy, linear momentum and angular momentum as first integrals of the dynamics. Additional topics in mechanics include stress and strain, simple harmonic motion and hydrostatics. Absolute temperature scales, thermal expansion, specific heats, methods of transfer of heat energy, ideal gases and real gases are considered before studying the first and second laws of thermodynamics, with the concept of entropy emphasized in the latter.

Prerequisite: Math-111

Co-requisite: MATH-112, PHYS-201


PHYS-201L (Formerly L325) 0-3-1

Physics I: Mechanics and Heat Laboratory

In this one-credit laboratory course students perform, analyze and submit lab reports based on experiments which test the theories developed in Physics I: Mechanics and Heat and they take quizzes based both on the lab instructions and material from the lectures.

Co-requisite: MATH-112, PHYS-201


PHYS-203 (Formerly S116) 3-0-3

Physics II: Waves, Electricity, Magnetism and Light

The mathematical representation of traveling sinusoidal waves and standing-wave patterns is emphasized. Applications are made to sound waves. Electrostatics include Gauss’s law, electric potentials and the potential gradient equation. The field concepts are used to interpret elementary D.C. circuits including Kirchhoff’s Rules. Capacitors as circuit elements and dielectrics are also studied. The effects of the magnetic field, its sources, induced EMFs and magnetic materials are considered. Series AC circuits conclude electromagnetism. Geometric optics includes lenses, mirrors and optical instruments. Physical optics includes interference and polarization of light waves.

Prerequisites: PHYS-201 and PHYS-201L

Co-requisite: PHYS-203L


PHYS-203L (Formerly S116) 0-3-1

Physics II Laboratory: Waves, Electricity, Magnetism and Light

In this one-credit laboratory course students perform, analyze and submit lab reports based on experiments which test the theories developed in Physics II: Waves, Electricity, Magnetism and Light. They take quizzes based both on the lab instructions and material from the lectures.

Co-requisite: PHYS-203

Prerequisites: PHYS-201 and PHYS-201L


PHYS-314 (Formerly S114) 3-0-3

Elements of Quantum Mechanics

The experimental background of quantum mechanics is reviewed before its postulates are introduced, and the theory is used to solve one-dimensional examples including the harmonic oscillator, then  — in three dimensions — the hydrogen atom, electron spin and atomic spectra. Applications to chemistry are stressed.

Prerequisites: MATH-225, PHYS-201


PRINT-101 (Formerly T938)1-5-3

Introduction to Print Design

This course introduces the basic concepts and processes of analog and digital printing methods. Students will learn the hands on process of screen-printing as well as the technical process of large format digital printing. This class explores the use of printing as a vehicle for both creative expression and visual communication.

Prerequisites: ADFND-102, DSGNFND 203 or INDD-102. This course is closed to all Textile Design majors.


PRINT-301 (Formerly T740)1-5-3

Printing Practices

This course introduces production of printed textiles by hand-screen and digital fabric printing methods. Students will learn a technical process of color separations, screen making and printing in both digital and conventional (hands-on) modes. Integration of digital and hands-on printing are encouraged toward the end of the course. The main focus is placed on aesthetics of color and styling in textile design on fabric. Sketchbook study will be required to document design processes, ideas and drawings.

Prerequisite: PRINT-303


PRINT-303 (Formerly T705)1-5-3

Print Design Studio I

Techniques, materials, tools and basic information needed for the design on paper of printed fabrics for the apparel and home furnishing fields are studied. Hands on approaches with gouache and watercolor are used to prepare colorway and repeats. Students prepare a portfolio and learn to keep a sketchbook. A brief introduction to printing methods is included.

Prerequisite: DRAW-303 Advanced Drawing: Materials & Techniques and VSDES-101 and Admission to the Textile Design Program or by permission of program director.


PRINT-305 (Formerly T745)2-2-3

Textile Printing Technology

The theory and practice of all aspects of industrial printing techniques are presented in a lecture/demonstration/lab format. Cloth preparation and finishing, machinery, dyestuffs and various print styles are included. This course offers practical background knowledge to students with primary interest in textile design, styling, marketing, quality control and textile manufacturing.


PRINT-315 (Formerly T706)1-5-3

Print Design Studio II

This course focuses on creative use of CAD in surface patterning, which integrates with hands-on design applications that students acquired in PRINT-303 Print Design Studio I. Digital workflow, which includes scanning croquis, designing pattern on CAD, digital color matching and color ways will be introduced. At the same time, strong emphasis is placed on making croquis, which develop from drawings and paintings in the sketchbook. Students will create printed textile designs and patterns for Jacquard designs on paper with digital printers for apparel and home furnishing fields. Throughout the semester, sketchbook study will also be required to document the working process, as well as drawings and paintings.

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in PRINT-303


PRINT-331 (Formerly T707)1-5-3

Print Design Studio III

This is an advanced course to give students further necessary experience in developing and producing creative designs for special markets, end uses and fabrics. Market research is required before projects are begun.

Prerequisite: PRINT-315


PSYCH-101 (Formerly H801)3-0-3

Introduction to Psychology

This course is an introduction to the methodology, concepts, principles and issues in the study of behavior. Topics to be covered include: the biological bases of behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; learning, memory and cognition; motivation and emotion; personality, psychopathology and psychological approaches to therapy; and social interactions. This course is a requirement for enrollment in all higher-level psychology courses.


PSYCH-103 (Formerly H881) 3-0-3

Physiological Psychology

This course will expand upon the biological bases of behavior. An emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the brain and behavior. Topics will include synthesis of neurotransmitters, an introduction to drugs and behavior and neural substrates that underlie behaviors.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-201 (Formerly H823) 3-0-3

Abnormal Psychology

Students will consider of the various classifications and symptomatology of psychopathological disorders — their origin, assessment, prognosis, treatment and prevention.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-210 (Formerly H825) 3-0-3

Forensic Psychology

Students will examine the interplay between the disciplines of psychology and law. The course will examine the psychological and behavioral issues that impact the legal and criminal-justice systems, and how law and justice affect human behavior. Topics to be covered include crime and criminal behavior, victims, law enforcement, trials, witnesses, mental illness and criminal justice, corrections, family law, crime intervention and prevention.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-211 (Formerly H861) 3-0-3

Learning Theory

Students will study the acquisition, activation, direction and retention of human and animal behavior. Topics to be covered include instincts, drive, conditioning and instrumental learning, human verbal learning and language learning and memory processes.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-212 (Formerly H862) 3-0-3

Cognitive Psychology

Study of human thinking, memory, problem solving and the relationship between damage to the cortex and information processing. Empirical research and applied examples and demonstrations will be presented to address such topics as the content of memory, memory improvement, strategies and approaches for solving different kinds of problems, and pathologies and problems of thought.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-213 (Formerly H870) 3-0-3

Developmental Psychology

Students will analyze the process of human development and change throughout the lifespan. Research on both humans and animals will be presented to promote understanding of human physical, social, emotional and cognitive development. Topics include prenatal and postnatal development, issues and theories of human development, genetic influences and personality and issues related to the aging process.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-214 (Formerly H863) 3-0-3

History and Systems in Psychology

Students will study the historical development of significant psychological concepts, theories and systems. The focus and far-ranging content of this course serves to provide an overall synthesis of the major subfields of psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-220 (Formerly H812) 3-0-3

Clinical Psychology

This course will provide students with an opportunity to use current theories to address individuals with mental-health issues. Topics will include professional duties and skills of the clinical psychologist, treatment procedures and resources and the diagnosis and management of common psychological disorders. Emphasis will be placed on humanistic and behavioral theories of etiology, treatment and the enhancement of psychological well-being.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-201


PSYCH-221 (Formerly H822) 3-0-3

Personality Theory

This course is a survey and comparative analysis of the major representative theories of personality, both traditional and contemporary. Special topics such as the effects of genetic predisposition, physical status and environmental factors on personality configurations will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-222 (Formerly H824) 3-0-3

Counseling Psychology: Theories and Principles

This course provides an overview and general understanding of the field of counseling psychology. The course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, interventions, scientific research, professional practices and contemporary issues of the profession of counseling psychology. Students will learn a variety of theoretical approaches and psychotherapy techniques to counseling, including psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive and humanistic approaches. The course contains both didactic and skill application to encourage competency in the performance of counseling skills.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-201


PSYCH-223 (Formerly H826) 3-0-3

Marriage and Family

This course is a survey of family systems and theories underlying marriage and family counseling. The course will explore the history of marriage, the choosing of a partner, parenting styles, and issues that create marital discord and divorce. Specific course objectives are to provide information about the therapeutic process and the practical elements of counseling interactions with families, to identify differences between individual- and system-oriented therapies, and to encourage the integration of theoretical and experiential learning.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-224 (Formerly H888) 3-0-3

Psychology of Addiction

This course is a survey of current psychological theories of the addiction process and treatment modalities based on each. Physiology and neurobiology will be considered, but are not the primary focus of the course. Theoretical models include: the disease model, psychoanalytic formulations, conditioning theory, social-learning theory, family-systems theory and the opponent-process model. Sociocultural perspectives, including deviance theory, will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-230 (Formerly H831) 3-0-3

Industrial Organizational Psychology

Students will study the more recent methods in testing, interviewing and selection of workers. Training, motivation, performance appraisal, job satisfaction, morale, job analysis, decision making, leadership and organization theory are other topics discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-231 (Formerly H832) 3-0-3

Psychological Assessment

This is a methods course concerning the basic concepts and techniques of psychological assessment tools (tests) as they are used in the profession if psychology in employment, school, clinical and medical settings. Emphasis will be placed on understanding test design, or what goes into a test, as well as understanding test scores and profiles, or what comes out of a test. Many specific tests will be highlighted throughout the course to help students appreciate psychological tests and become aware of their functions and limitations.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-232 (Formerly H851) 3-0-3

Social Psychology

Students will study the experimental analysis of the individual as subjected to the social influence of other individuals or social groups. Topics to be covered include persuasion, conformity, aggression, altruism, prejudice and interpersonal attraction and an analysis of the research methods used to study these behaviors.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-233 (Formerly H853) 3-0-3

Interpersonal Relations and Small Group Dynamics

This course is designed to provide a theoretical and experiential exposure to group formation, group process and group dynamics, as well as to interpersonal relationships within and between groups.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-240 (Formerly H880) 3-0-3

Comparative Psychology

This course will provide a survey of the study of animal behavior as related to psychology. Students will become familiar with approaches, fundamental concepts and contemporary research findings of the field. Topics include patterns and development of behavior in animals, neural and hormonal influences, animal learning and cognition and the evolution of behavior.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-241 (Formerly H883) 3-0-3

Psychopharmacology

Students will study the basic principles of drug action in the central nervous system. Topics will include effects of stimulants, depressants, intoxicants and drug abuse on behavioral function. The clinical use of drugs in the treatment of psychological and psychiatric disorders will be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-103


PSYCH-242 (Formerly H884) 3-0-3

Sensations and Perceptions

Sensations refer to information about the environment gathered through the senses. Perception is the process by which sensory information is interpreted and made meaningful. This course will provide a survey of the study of sensation and perception from structural, functional and cognitive viewpoints.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-103


PSYCH-243 (Formerly H885) 3-0-3

Human Sexuality

This course involves a rigorous examination of the biological, behavioral and mental aspects of human sexuality. Among the topics to be studied are anatomy and physiology, conception and contraception, sex roles, love, sexual communication, sexual dysfunctions and social issues such as pornography.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-322 (Formerly H804) 2-2-3

Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences

This course introduces psychology as an experimental science in which hypotheses are generated and tested. Major topics will include various types of experimental designs, subject selection and randomization. Students will be introduced to various data collection methods and research designs specific to the different branches of psychology.

Prerequisite: STAT-220


PSYCH-371 (Formerly H896) 3-0-3

Selected Topics in Psychology

An in-depth consideration of a particular topic, issue or problem in psychology that is of special interest to students and faculty. Recent sections have discussed topics such as educational psychology, psychosexual development and the psychology of trauma. Topic selection will be done in advance of registration.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101


PSYCH-381 (Formerly H899) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Psychology

For further details, see general description of “Independent Study” in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


PSYCH-391 (Formerly H890) 2-2-3

Advanced Research in Psychology

(writing intensive)

This course will involve an in-depth exploration of research methods in psychology. Students will conduct an original research project individually or as part of a research team. Through this course, students will apply their psychological training to designing, conducting, analyzing, discussing and presenting their own research project.

Prerequisites: PSYCH-322 and completion of at least 21 credits in psychology courses


PSYCH-410 (Formerly H805) 3-0-3

Senior Colloquium in Psychology

This course is a senior-level seminar dealing with current controversial issues in psychology. Students will perform a search of the scientific literature on issues chosen from a list provided by the instructor and organize, analyze, orally present and discuss material with the class. Finally, students will propose a question generated from this activity and design a research structure to answer it.

Prerequisites: PSYCH-391


PUBH-1013-0-3

Introduction to Public Health

This is the foundation course of the Public Health major and provides students with a general overview of principles of public health. The course explains and draws from the interdisciplinary focus of public health theory and practice. Presented will be the concepts of health, population health and the structure and activities of modern public health systems. The major determinants of health, the causes of disease and concepts of disease control and prevention are discussed.


PUBH-2013-0-3

Introduction to Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the fundamental science of public health. This course presents basic principles of epidemiology including concepts of time, place and person in disease occurrence, disease causality, disease rates, sensitivity and specificity and epidemiologic data analysis. Reviewed are the applications of epidemiology to infectious and chronic diseases, occupation, the environment and health services delivery. Included are the basic types of observational and experimental studies as they relate to human diseases and key concepts in epidemiologic methods such as bias and confounding.

Prerequisites: MATH-100 or 101 or 102 or 103 or 111


SCI-101 (Formerly L121)3-2-3

Environmental Science

Environmental Science is the study of how humans and the natural environment interact. Critical issues that affect our daily lives such as clean drinking water, urban renewal, energy availability, pesticides, global warming, acid rain and recycling are explored from social, ecological, chemical and political perspectives. Students will tackle a real-life environmental problem in a professional manner using critical thinking and analytical skills, library research skills, teamwork and presentation skills.


SCI-102 2-3-3

Exploring Science

(for non-science majors)

This hands-on science course delves into public health issues. Field and laboratory sessions focus on data analysis based on issues from students’ daily lives which leads to an examination of alternatives. How do you quit smoking? What is in the water you drink and the food you eat? The course culminates in a project that explores the historical, political, and environmental aspects of an unsolved scientific problem and presents the findings to a regional scientific agency.


SCI-106 (also listed as DECSYS-206) 3-0-3

Biology for Design: From Biological Adaptation to Biomimetic Design

The goal of this course is to increase the sophistication of design, engineering, business and other students regarding how design manifests itself in nature as biological adaptation, and to use that knowledge as a launching pad for thinking about biomimetic design. Biomimicry is a hot topic in architecture and design. Work in this field is usually done by designers working in collaboration with biologists who are highly specialized in a particular area, often plant or animal physiology. However, there are certain conceptual underpinnings pertaining to design and adaptation in nature that designers are often lacking that will prepare them for further exploration of this field. The course consists of two major units, the first focusing on the biology of adaptation from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. The second section consists of a survey of biomimetic design and how biomimicry has been employed to solve a range of design problems in architecture, materials science, systems design and technology. (This course can be used to satisfy a College Studies Science requirement.)

Prerequisites: None


SCI-108 (also listed as DECSYS-208) 2-3-3

Sustainability & Eco-Innovations

The emerging fields of sustainability and environmental sciences will be surveyed to highlight how entrepreneurs are capitalizing on rapid environmental transformation. The rate, scale and degree of global environmental change, key scientific feedback loops the regional differences in terms of impacts and opportunities will be analyzed. Case studies of eco-innovation strategies employed by businesses and designers will be explored so that students can create their own scientific monitoring and evaluation plan for implementing a simple eco-innovation. (This course can be used to satisfy a College Studies Science requirement.)


SCI-110 (Formerly Larch 105) 2-2-3

Landscape Ecology

Landscape Ecology combines the spatial approach of the landscape planner and designer with the functional approach of the ecologist. As a field it is an integrative and multidisciplinary science that combines geology, botany, zoology and human settlements at the “landscape” scale. For this course the focus will be various land use scales, i.e., the block, neighborhood, city, and region and how ecological processes function at each scale. Students learn the key principles of landscape ecology and then how to apply them to preservation, conservation, planning and the design process. (This course can be used to satisfy a College Studies Science requirement.) Prerequisite: None.


SCI-202 (also listed as DECSYS-202) 3-0-3

Materials Selection

The materials available to meet design requirements for a specific application often limit performance in disciplines ranging from engineering and architecture, through industrial design, to fashion design and textiles. In fact, material selection is often the limiting performance factor in designing new products and processes. This course explores the governing principles of materials science, with a specific emphasis on using the scientific method to develop a “system approach” to materials selection at various stages of the design process. (This course can be used to satisfy a College Studies Science requirement.)


SCI-300 3-0-3

Basic Pharmacology

This course introduces the student to the basic principles of pharmacology including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The course will cover frequently prescribed medications, their uses, actions and common side effects. The student will learn about the various drug classification systems, as well as the effects of those drug classes on specific patient populations, and the process of preventing medication errors deriving from the use of pharmacologic agents.

Prerequisites: BIOL-104 and BIOL-104L, CHEM-104 and CHEM-104L


SCI-381, SCI-382 (Formerly C281, C282) 0-0-3, 0-0-3

Independent Study I & II in Science

Students interested in pursuing independent study in science must submit a proposal to the academic associate dean of undergraduate programs in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts for approval at least two weeks before pre-registration. Detailed guidelines for development of the proposal may be obtained from the College. See “Independent Study” in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required. Also see appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


SCI-399 (Formerly STUAB-300, S464) 1-6-4

Selected Topics Study Abroad in Science

International experience is invaluable in all scientific disciplines and strongly encouraged by the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts. Students will collect, analyze and present data in a scientific discipline both in the host country and to the Philadelphia University community. All students will have assignments and immersion in the cultural, social, environmental and historic foundations of the host country.

Prerequisites: 2.50 G.P.A., completion of two required college studies science courses (SCI-101, SCI-102, BIOL-101, BIOL-103, CHEM-101, CHEM-103, PHYS-101 or PHYS-201) or permission of the instructor, and successful completion of the Study Abroad application and policy guidelines process. This course is eligible for an Honors upgrade.


SERVE-101 0-1-1

Civic Engagement: Serving and Learning in Philadelphia

Through the completion of a 10-hour service project, online journaling, attending four class meetings, and participation in a service-learning showcase, students will serve the greater Philadelphia community in an area of interest and explore the reciprocal nature and responsibility of citizenship for the individual and community. This course may be taken in place of the two-course physical education requirement, and it may be taken an additional three times for free elective credits.


SOC-201 (Formerly L362) 3-0-3

Class, Gender and Race in World Societies

A study of theories, concepts and methods of social science, this course focuses on the nature of economic, racial and sexual stratification in the United States and around the world. The course is designed to enable one to understand and to be able to use social science to analyze and influence situations and environments.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX


SOC-204 (Formerly L363) 3-0-3

Personality and World Cultures

This course is an introduction to the social sciences through the focused study of personality and culture. Material will illustrate quantitative and qualitative methods of social-science research. Students will explore concepts, theories and research representing psychological and anthropological approaches, using both classic and contemporary texts. Students will gain an appreciation of cross-cultural variability in personality.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX


SOC-208 (Formerly L364) 3-0-3

The Individual and the Global Environment

This course will introduce students to the social sciences by focusing upon issues in the environment. By examining goals of the new environmentalism, by direct individual and community involvement and by understanding the present state of the world and future trends, the student will have the skills to prepare for a sustainable society, a society that satisfies its needs without jeopardizing the prospects of future generations.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX


SOC-211 (Formerly L366) 3-0-3

Power and Poverty in the Global Economy

The course will emphasize the intersection between global political relations and global economics, and how the two together impact social relations worldwide. Various complementary and competing political and economic perspectives (from capitalist to socialist) will be used to address recent trends in the development of a global economy, international trade, the formation of regional blocs such as NAFTA and the EU, and north-south political/economic relations.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX


SOC-225 (Formerly L367) 3-0-3

Global Politics

This course provides an overview of the forces that are shaping international politics and economics. This course will help students understand the roles of international institutions such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund, as well as non-governmental actors such as Amnesty International and al Qaeda. Students will also examine the process of economic globalization in order to understand its varying impacts on different world regions.

Prerequisites: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX


SPAN-101 (Formerly L342) 3-0-3

Spanish I

A beginner’s course designed for students with very little or no knowledge of the language. The focus is on basic oral expression, listening comprehension and acquiring simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and to begin to have conversations. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisite: none.


SPAN-201 (Formerly L642) 3-0-3

Spanish II

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed one semester of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on oral expression, listening comprehension and the acquisition of simple reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence in the language and conduct conversations and other social interactions in the language with some level of ease. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


SPAN-202

Spanish for Healthcare Settings

Spanish for Healthcare Settings is a second-semester course designed for students to gain conversational competence to communicate effectively at a basic level with Spanish-speaking patients in a medical setting. The course focuses on practical vocabulary, grammar, idiomatic expressions, medical terminology as well as developing students’ oral communication skills. A main component of the class is the focus on cultural issues relevant to Spanish-speaking patients and particular health concerns relating to the Hispanic community in the U.S.


SPAN-301 (Formerly L742) 3-0-3

Spanish III

A beginner’s course designed for students who have completed two semesters of college-level language or the equivalent. The focus is on advancing oral expression, listening comprehension and the development of reading and writing skills, so that students can gain confidence and express themselves fluidly entirely in the target language. The course will also develop cultural understanding, a key element to language learning, through the analysis of authentic visual media, written materials and cross-cultural interactions.


SPAN-401 (Formerly L742, L842) 3-0-3

Spanish IV

An intermediate course that provides students with the opportunity to communicate in a fluent and sophisticated manner. The focus is on expanding the knowledge of structures and vocabulary that students have acquired in levels I-III. In addition to constant attention to speaking, writing, listening and reading, more complex ways of expression are also emphasized. Contemporary culture is explored through authentic visual media and written materials.


STAT-201 (Formerly B151) 3-0-3

Statistics I for Business

Descriptive statistical measures and probability theory are combined to provide the basis for statistical decision-making techniques. Areas covered will include data presentation; measures of central tendency; measures of variability; basic probability laws, Bayes’ theorem; binomial; Poisson; “t,” and normal distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisite: Quantitative Reasoning I


STAT-202 (Formerly B152) 3-0-3

Statistics II for Business

Review of sampling distribution, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for two-samples; simple linear regression, multiple linear regression with emphasis on computer output; one- and two-way analysis of variance; application of the Chi-square statistic; and non-parametric statistical techniques. Passing grade for STAT-202 is a C-.

Prerequisite: grade of “C-” or better in STAT-201


STAT-220

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

This course will provide an understanding of descriptive and statistical procedures commonly used in psychological research. Descriptive statistic topics include the presentation of data, probability, measures of central tendency and variability, and correlation. Inferential statistics topics will include an introduction to hypothesis testing, t-tests, correlation, analysis of variance, regression and various non-parametric statistics. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interconnection between experimental design in psychology and statistical principles.

Prerequisite: PSYCH-101

STAT-301 (Formerly S466) 3-0-3

Biostatistics

This course will cover principles of experimental design and statistics for biologists in environmental and medical fields. Hypothesis testing; data collection and sampling; data analysis and graphing; univariate; bivariate and multivariate analysis including regression and ANOVA will be covered. Students will design an experiment and compare and contrast the results of several different statistical approaches to data analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in either MATH-111 or MATH-112


STUAB-300 (Formerly T100) 0-0-(3-12)

Textile Studies Abroad

Students have the opportunity to study in international textile schools. The School of Design and Engineering should be contacted for further information.

Prerequisites: junior status, 2.50 G.P.A.


STUAB-300 (Formerly B100) 0-0-(4-6)

International Business Studies Abroad

International Business majors are required to study abroad an equivalent of four to six credit hours. The location must be consistent with the foreign language studies chosen. The study abroad may be in the form of an internship or studies at an international university or college. Students must apply for and coordinate their study abroad through the International Business coordinator. A minimum of six months is usually required between the application and the actual study abroad.

Prerequisites: equivalent of semester-three language proficiency (Intermediate Low of the ACTFL proficiency standard) in a second language and permission of the International Business program coordinator.


STUAB-300 (Formerly A100) 0-0-(3-12)

Architecture/Design Abroad

Contact the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, or the Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce for further information.

Prerequisites for Architecture: 2.00 G.P.A., grade of “C” or better in both ARCH-311 and ARCH-312; or grade of “C” or better in INTD-302, and permission of both the study abroad director and program director

Prerequisites for Design: DSGNFND-103, ADFND-101 or INDD-101

Cannot be taken as a replacement for WEAV-201.


STUAB-301 0-0-3

Study Abroad Project Documentation

This course will be a vehicle for students to analyze and document their study abroad experience and then share it with the university community. Similar to an independent study, students will be required to keep a journal while abroad. When they return, they will document their individual academic and personal experience as well as working on group projects to produce a public exhibition.

Prerequisites: STUAB 300


SUST-100 3-0-3

Introduction to Sustainability

As the gateway to the Environmental Sustainability major, this course introduces students to the core concepts of sustainability theory and practice. Students will explore the ethical principles, social structures, technologies and political and economic processes necessary for humans to live sustainably in community with each other, other species and our natural environment.


SUST-120 3-0-3

Sustainable Food Chains

This course examines one of the most fundamental sustainability challenges that we will face this century: how to feed 9-10 billion people without depleting the planet’s soils, water supplies, oil resources and biodiversity. Sustainable Food Chains explores the environmental impact of modern industrial agriculture and examines alternative approaches to food production that reduce the use of non-renewable resources, respect natural processes and work in harmony with local ecosystems, communities and economies.


SUST-121 3-0-3

The Environment and World Cultures

Global religions, cultures, and philosophies, both past and present, have interpreted the relationship between human society and the natural environment in a variety of ways. In this course students will study attitudes towards the environment, its protection, and sustainability though the lenses of several major religions and philosophies, and will compare how these worldviews offer differing perspectives on the role of “Nature” in everyday life.


SUST-200 3-0-3

Energy Systems and Politics

The rising international demand for fossil fuels, the increasing concerns about dwindling energy reserves and the growing evidence of climate change are combining to accelerate the search for alternative energy sources. This course will analyze the environmental, economic and political dynamics of the existing energy regime and help students evaluate the potential and drawbacks of possible energy alternatives.

Prerequisites: HIST-1XX


SUST-202 3-0-3

Economics of Sustainability

This course introduces students to general economic theory and how it can be applied to the analysis of sustainability issues. Topics include the economics of sustainable development, cost-benefit analysis related to environmental initiatives and the evaluation of policies for more sustainable production and consumption.

Prerequisites: HIST-114


SUST-204 3-0-3

Sustainable Planning & Land Use

This course examines land use and urban planning questions from the perspective of sustainability. Topics include “smart” growth/development, wilderness conservation, community activism, environmental justice, brownfield and grayfield redevelopment, greenfield preservation, zoning for mixed-use neighborhoods, mass transit planning, and transit-oriented development (TOD).

Prerequisites: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX


SUST-300 3-0-3

Sustainable Technologies for Architecture

This course provides students with the skills and vocabularies to converse and enhance their ability to collaborate with professionals. This course is intended as an introduction to sustainable architecture and its technologies that are typically used in practice.

Prerequisite: SUST-204


SUST-302 3-0-3

Industrial Ecology

Industrial Ecology is the study of how industrial processes affect the environment. Students will learn approaches and tools to evaluate products, processes and systems in their entire life-cycle, including: material flow analysis, design for environment, input-output analysis, life-cycle assessment, industrial symbiosis and sustainable consumption.

Prerequisites: 2 courses from the Science Group and WRTG-21X


SUST-303 3-0-3

Global Environmental History

(writing intensive)

Global Environmental History allows students to develop a historical perspective on the relationship between human societies and the natural environments that surround and support them. As this course illustrates, some societies have succeeded in living in balance with local ecosystems, and some have failed. By analyzing these historical examples, students learn how various cultural, economic and political factors can combine to produce an environmentally sustainable society or a catastrophic ecological collapse.

Prerequisites: SOC-2XX


SUST-400 3-0-3

Sustainability and Development in the Non-Western World

This course examines sustainability issues in such non-European nations as China, Mexico, Brazil and Ghana. It looks at how local economic and cultural factors help shape sustainability strategies and examines the relationship between economic development and sustainability in a comparative framework.

Prerequisites: SOC-2XX


SUST-402 3-0-3

Managing Sustainable Organizations

This course answers the question, “How can we effectively manage sustainability in organizations?” The course uses contemporary readings, research, cases, and student projects to explore current and future approaches to sustainability within the context of management and organizations both within and beyond the traditional management framework of planning, organizing, leading and controlling.

Prerequisite: MGMT-301or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only) and one Junior Seminar


SUST-421 3-0-3

Environmental Policy

Environmental problems are essentially social, economic and political problems. This course traces the evolution of environmental policy, legislation, and regulations, both in the U.S. and worldwide, including the background and context of environmental policymaking. Students will also examine the substantive problems and political process of environmental movements, and contemporary environmental thought with regard to issues of sustainability and environmental justice.

Prerequisites: SOC-2XX and one junior seminar.


SUST-498 3-0-3

Environmental Sustainability Capstone Seminar

This capstone course for the Environmental Sustainability degree program uses case studies and a real-world project to review and integrate the skills and knowledge developed in the previous courses in the Environmental Sustainability curriculum. Applying the principles of systems thinking and other analytical tools, students solicit, develop, present, and implement a client-based sustainability initiative.

Prerequisites: SUST-402


TENGR-3063-2-3

Textile Engineering I (Linear Assemblies – Fibers & Yarns)

The molecular structure and morphologies of fibers are explored. The physical, chemical and mechanical properties and behavior of fibers is studied. Fiber-production processes are reviewed. An examination of systems employed in conversion of fibers into textile structures is conducted. Relationships between material/process constraints and product functional quality are analyzed. The laboratory explores the methods of evaluating fiber and yarn properties.

Prerequisites: PHYS-203 and CHEM-103


TENGR-308 3-2-3

Textile Engineering II (Planar Assemblies)

This course explores basic and complex designs, multiple layer, tubular and near net shape structures. Use of dobby and Jacquard, development and visualization of woven and knit fabric structures using CAD. Also explored are: Tensile, shear and bending characteristics of woven and knit fabrics, Effect of uniaxial and biaxial forces acting on fabrics, Effect of Poisson’s ratio, Fabric drape and formation of double curvatures,fabric surface characteristics.

Prerequisite: TENGR-306


TENGR-310 3-2-3

Textile Engineering III: Nonwovens and Chemical Processing

This lab-based course will focus on the production and evaluation of nonwoven fabrics, including web forming and bonding methods, and on coloration techniques, including dyeing and printing, as well as aesthetic and functional finishing.

Prerequisites are: TENGR-308 and CHEM 103


TENGR-320 3-2-3

Textile Engineering IV: Advanced Fibrous Materials

This course explores mechanics and processes for producing functionally advanced fibrous materials. Architectural, aerospace, recreational and biomedical application of textiles and concepts of advanced fiber composites will be covered.

Prerequisite: TENGR-310


TEXT-101 (Formerly T101)3-1-3

Survey of Textile Industry

Introduction to the language and process flow of fibers through finished products. Topics include fiber classification, formation and variants; spun and filament yarn processing, numbering systems, texturing and novelty yarns; woven, knit and nonwoven fabric formation, processing equipment and basic design elements; printing, dyeing and finishing processes; product evaluation; as well as government legislation related to textiles. A laboratory experience provides support for the lectures.


TEXT-104 2-2-3

Fiber and Yarn Studies

This course introduces the basic knowledge of fiber and yarn technology. Included are the proper use of fiber/yarn terms and definitions, the construction parameters of the various fiber and yarn types and detailed analysis of performance properties of each. This information is then used in the proper selection of fibers and yarns for various fabrics and ultimately for various end use products in apparel, household and industrial applications.


TEXT-113 (Formerly T301) 4-2-4

Yarn

The processes necessary for the manufacture of continuous filament, staple, novelty, bulk and stretch yarns are studied. Staple yarn manufacture, including the processing of natural and man-made fibers on the carded cotton, combed cotton, woolen and worsted staple yarn manufacturing system is covered. Quality-control procedures are emphasized. The laboratory experience exposes the student to all aspects of fiber to yarn formation.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101


TEXT-201 (Formerly T255) 2-2-3

Textile Production I

This course will focus on the following performance properties of textiles: strength, elongation, thermo-physiological comfort, sensorial-comfort body movement, aesthetic qualities, appearance, maintenance properties, and health/safety/protection properties. The process of achieving desired fabric properties through the use of appropriate fiber-, yarn- and fabric-production technology will be analyzed through theoretical studies and production laboratory exercises.

Any student who has received credit for TEXT-113, WEAV-201, KNIT-201, and/or TEXT-321 may not take this course

Prerequisite: TEXT-101


TEXT-209 (Formerly T630) 3-0-3

Industrial Textiles

The study of the major industrial fabric applications, constructions and future trends. The performance requirements for each application will be related to the selection of industrial fibers, yarn and fabric constructions and fabric finishing, coating and laminating.

Prerequisites: TEXT-307


TEXT-219 (Formerly T253) 3-0-3

Textiles for Interiors and Architecture

Focuses upon the unique problems and considerations of servicing the residential and contract textile-products market composed of upholstered furniture, window/wall coverings, carpets/rugs and furnishing accessories. Special textile requirements mandated by government agencies, building codes and industry-performance standards for residential, public and institutional interior spaces are emphasized.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101


TEXT-301 (Formerly T256) 3-0-3

Coloring & Finishing

This lecture-based course will focus on coloration techniques, including dyeing and printing; as well as aesthetic and functional finishing. Any student who has previously received credit for PRINT-305 and/or TEXTCHM-242 may not take this course for credit.

Fall only.

Prerequisite: CHEM-101 & TEXT-101


TEXT-305 (Formerly T207) 2-2-3

Advanced Fabric Performance Evaluation

The objective evaluation of fabric-mechanical properties influencing hand and performance are explored. Comfort-contributing qualities, such as thermal conductivity and air permeability, are also addressed. The influence of fabric-mechanical properties on formability and seaming is assessed with special attention to their role in automated assembly.

Prerequisite: TEXT-307 or TEXT-331


TEXT-307 (Formerly T201) 3-2-4

Textile Materials

The interrelationship of fiber selection, yarn processing, fabrication and finishing parameters is used to predict and measure fabric performance for specific end uses. A laboratory experience in textile product evaluation provides practical application of theory. The impact of textile-related government regulations is also emphasized.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101 or TEXT-104


TEXT-313 (Formerly T763) 3-0-3

Textile Costing

The cost of materials, labor, overhead and waste is studied in relation to textile production and finishing. Case studies illustrate cost systems used in textile mills. Interrelationships between labor, machines and facilities are analyzed to determine their relative importance in cost-reduction programs. Costing factors for domestic and imported fabrics are considered.

Prerequisites: WEAV-201, KNIT-201


TEXT-314 (Formerly T709) 0-0-3

European Textile Printing

A two-week study tour in the textile printing areas of France, Switzerland and Northern Italy introduces Textile Design and Textile Material Technology majors to the expertise of important European printers, screen engravers and studios in the areas of printed textile design, style, color and printing technology. Visits to the two important French historic textile museums and other related textile plants are also included.

Prerequisite: PRINT-315 or PRINT-301 or PRINT-305 or permission of the program director


TEXT-315 (Formerly T208) 1-4-3

Interior Fabric Performance

Evaluations of fabrics and materials intended for end use in home furnishings are covered in this course. The use of physical testing to predict performance potential is emphasized. The use of instrumentations in the evaluation of surface and color change is presented.

Prerequisite: TEXT-307


TEXT-316 (Formerly T767) 3-0-3

Textile Quality Management

Recently, quality has emerged as a formal management function — no longer restricted to manufacturing and operational areas, it now includes the design, purchasing and marketing processes. Through lecture, discussion and experientials, this course examines quality theory and practice — how a more sophisticated understanding of quality can lead to a strategic approach to quality management that is necessary to compete in today’s global marketplace. Factors required for creating and maintaining a corporation’s strategies and competitive edge are analyzed.

Prerequisites: MGMT-301 or MGMT 104 (for DEC students only); and WEAV-301 or KNIT-205


TEXT-317 (Formerly T811) 3-0-3

Textile Production Control

Production — its measurement and control — is studied through plant and equipment layouts, as well as equipment selection. Methods of managing people and the equipment to optimize production are discussed.

Prerequisites: WEAV-201, KNIT-201


TEXT-321 (Formerly T620) 2-2-3

Nonwovens

The methods of web formation, bonding, end-use and market potential for nonwovens are investigated. In the laboratory, dry-laid and wet-laid nonwovens are manufactured and later evaluated in the testing laboratory for their unique characteristics.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101


TEXT-325 (Formerly T621) 2-2-3

Fibrous Composite Materials

Exploration of properties of various fibers and fibrous constructions as applied to composites; fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites; and analysis of properties of new materials and technology.

Prerequisite: MATH-112, ENGR-215


TEXT-331 (Formerly T240) 3-0-3

Apparel Fabric Performance

The course focuses upon the dependent relationship of the raw materials, manufacturing processes and finishing techniques that influence the actual performance of apparel products. This will enable students to evaluate a garment’s suitability for a specific end use when any fabric variable is altered or when a product’s construction and composition is examined. Federally mandated and voluntary labeling requirements will be emphasized. This course cannot be taken for credit by students who have taken TEXT-307.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101


TEXT-335 (Formerly T625) 1-4-3

Nonwovens Fabrication and Design

Experimentation in the methods of nonwoven web formation, bonding, end use and expanded market potential for nonwovens are investigated. In the design studio, students will conduct market research while concurrently developing design concepts through hands-on laboratory experience. Each student will create a collection of samples with a specified intention exercising knowledge of fiber and fabrication properties, aesthetic qualities and performance characteristics.


TEXT-371 (Formerly T890) 3-0-3

Special Topics in Textiles

A topic of special interest to students majoring in Textile Design, or Textile Engineering Technology. The special topic will vary.

Prerequisites will vary.


TEXT-381, TEXT-382 (Formerly T798, T799) 0-0-3

Independent Study in Textiles I and II

For details, see description of Independent Study in “University Academic Policies and Procedures” section.

Permission required. See appropriate form online at the University Registrar’s webpage www.philau.edu/registrar for more information.


TEXT-391 (Formerly T295) 1-5-3

Textile Design Research

This course will focus on uses of various design resources such as museums, market information, color forecasts, trade shows, nature and current events to generate design ideas suitable for the student’s concentration area. Active research will result in a written and illustrated sketchbook of ideas to be used in advanced studio course projects, as well as portfolio-suitable drawings and paintings.

Prerequisites: DRAW-303 and VSDES-101 and Admission to the Textile Design Program (TEXD.BS.DAY) or by permission of program director.


TEXT-411 (Formerly T790) 1-0-1

Seminar: Textile/Apparel Industry Issues

Seminars will expose students to diverse views, as well as enable them to discuss broad issues that cut across several disciplines. New technology and processes, business ethics, industry forecasting and marketing innovations, as well as career information, are effectively presented in this format. One credit of Textile/Apparel Industry Issues is required for TD, TET, FD and FMM majors.


TEXT-487N (Formerly TEXT-487, T290) 4-0-6

Textile Engineering Technology Senior Project

(writing intensive)

Design, development, manufacturing, research and other thought-provoking problems are presented. Students will work in teams to analyze information/data on numerous textile- or apparel-related problems. The final project will reflect the work previously conducted in the TET Option and will constitute the final submission to each student’s digital portfolio.

Prerequisite: WRTG-2XX, completion of 12 credits in TET Option


TEXT-489

Textile Design Senior Seminar

The capstone course for students within the Textile Design major during which the students will develop a professional portfolio in actual and digital formats and refine work for their final exhibition. Students’ individual interests will guide market research and the resultant development of targeted lists of potential employers. Resumes, cover letters and promotional packets will be developed during the course of the semester.

Prerequisite: Senior status


TEXT-499 0-12-6

Textile Design Capstone

Students develop projects independently and are required to demonstrate ability and understanding of textile design theory, processes and principles. The final project requires topic research, design exploration, development and final professional presentation. Additionally, a resume, culminating portfolio and support materials will be developed.

Prerequisites: pre or co-requisite of two Textile Design Designated Electives


TEXTCHM-242 (Formerly C501) 4-2-4

Dyeing and Finishing
(writing intensive)

This course presents an overview of the wet processing of fibers, yarns and fabrics. Included are the preparation, dyeing and finishing of textiles. Some emphasis is placed on the chemistry and technology involved in these operations. Dyes are studied by their method of application and the primary substrates to which they are applied. Chemical, thermal and mechanical processes are discussed for both preparation and finishing of fabrics.

Prerequisite: CHEM-101 or CHEM 103, WRTG-101


TEXTCHM-338 (Formerly C116) 4-2-4

Organic/Textile Chemistry

Aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds with emphasis on those syntheses and reactions that play a role in textile chemistry. Also includes the chemistry of carbohydrates and proteins, regenerated polymers, polymerization, synthetic polymers, the synthesis and chemistry of finishing agents and dyes. The laboratory portion illustrates basic techniques and reactions and the applications of textile chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHEM-101 or CHEM 103


VSDES-101 1-5-3

Visual Studies: Design

This Foundations level design course confronts the process and principles of design. Students

learn studio practices and gain facility to use a variety of materials in order to foster a hands-on creative experience. Design students in this course will develop sensitivity to value and color relationships with strategies for their use. Projects will be short in duration with a succession of increasingly complex concepts. The primary aspect of the course is two-dimensional design with a short period of three- dimensional study.

*This course should not be taken by students who have received credit for Design I or Design II in the School of Design & Engineering or the College of Architecture and the Built Environment*


VSDRW-101 1-5-3

Visual Studies: Drawing

This drawing course emphasizes the understanding of space and alternative approaches for recording and expressing it. Much information in regard to drawing practice will be accumulated during this semester such as mark making skills, developing sensitivity to light and shade, experimentation with media and the use of color as an introduction to figure drawing.

*This course should not be taken by students who have received credit for DRAW 101 or DRAW 201 in the School of Design & Engineering or the College of Architecture and the Built Environment.*


WEAV-201 (Formerly T451) 4-2-4

Weave Technology I

The structures and analysis of woven fabrics will be studied utilizing CAD, pick outs and laboratory assignments on industrial equipment. Weave structures will include plain, twills and satins (with their derivatives), color effects, textural effects (cords, etc.) and pile weaves. Fabric will be mathematically analyzed for weight, yarn size, fabric count and yarn crimp to specify fabric structure. Necessary loom controls (draw, chains and reed plans) will be used to relate lectures and laboratory work on dobby looms.

Prerequisite: TEXT-101 or TEXT-104 and Admission to the Textile Design (TEXD.BS.DAY) or Textile Materials Technology (TMT.BS.DAY) Programs or by permission of program director.


WEAV-207 (Formerly T440) 1-5-3

Weave Design Studio I

This course focuses on the effects and interactions that yarn, color, texture and structure play in woven design. Working with multi-harness floor looms, students create warps and chains, and weave prototype cloth for various end uses.

Prerequisite: WEAV-207, KNIT-203 and TEXT-391


WEAV-226 (Formerly T420) 3-2-4

Jacquard

The principles and equipment involved in the design and production of Jacquard fabrics are studied. Students analyze, design and produce complex Jacquard fabrics on commercial equipment including computerized design and production systems.

Prerequisite: WEAV-201


WEAV-301 (Formerly T452) 4-2-4

Weave Technology II

The variations, function, auxiliary devices and design characteristics of cam, dobby and Jacquard weaving machines, and the equipment used to support the weaving process are studied; along with relevant calculations regarding time, materials and production of fabrics. The technique required to accurately analyze fabrics for all critical components and methods to design fabrics for specific weight and compact cover, with consideration given to yarn size, texture, fiber type, weave and other fabric parameters, will be learned. Advanced multi-layer weaves will be studied, analyzed and woven.

Prerequisite: WEAV-201


WEAV-307 (Formerly T441) 1-5-3

Weave Design Studio II

The study of elements of woven design is brought to the problems of multi-layered cloth, compound weaves, block designs and other advanced structures. Students use several CAD programs in conjunction with AVL compu-dobbies to increase their design capabilities. Multi-harness floor looms and dobby looms are also used to develop cloth from concept to actuality.

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in WEAV-207


WEAV-327 (Formerly T442) 1-5-3

Weave Design Studio III

Through an advanced study in woven-textile design, students develop a comprehensive working knowledge of the process of styling fabric for specific textile markets. Depending on the projects’ parameters, students may use AVL compu-dobbies or multi-harness floor looms.

Prerequisite: WEAV-307


WEAV-401 (Formerly T478) 1-5-3

Introduction to Woven Design

(for non-textile design majors)

This course focuses on the effects and interactions that yarn, color, texture and structure play in woven design, as they relate to a range of end use applications. Students will develop fabrics appropriate for their particular area of interest or major field of study. Using multi-harness looms, students will create and weave a variety of samples and prototype cloth.


WRTG-100 (Formerly WRTG-099) 3-0-3

Introduction to Academic Writing

Writing 100 teaches writing in the context of reading and thinking about the diversity of American society. The course helps students to learn to write and write to learn. In learning to write, students learn to manipulate and negotiate the genres and conventions of academic discourse. In writing to learn, students develop process-based approaches to writing including invention, revision, and reflection. Students who pass this course with a C or better continue to Writing Seminar I.


WRTG-100G 3-0-3

Introduction to Academic Writing—Global

Writing 100G teaches writing in the context of reading and thinking about the diversity of American society. This course parallels Writing 100 but is designed for students who did not learn English as their first language. As with WRTG 100, its main focus is on using writing as a tool for clarifying thinking, establishing a process-based approach to writing, developing critical reading skills and constructing arguments. Additionally, students will focus on the cultural conventions of academic writing and develop and apply an increasingly complex range of language. Students write both formally and informally and, as with Writing 100, "write to learn." Students must complete the course with a C or better before moving on to Writing Seminar I.


WRTG-101G (Formerly WRTG-100ESL, L111ESL) 3-2-3

Writing Seminar I: Finding Philadelphia—Global

This course parallels WRTG-101, yet is specifically designed for students whose first language is not English. As does WRTG-101, this course includes reading and discussion about a variety of texts that share a common theme. Writing assignments include at least three expository essays and a library research paper related to the theme. To be placed in the course, students must either pass WRTG-098ESL or, after submitting a writing sample, be placed by a designated faculty member.


WRTG-101 3-0-3

Writing Seminar I: Finding Philadelphia

This course is based on the idea that reading, writing and thinking within a specific context are crucial to successful college work. Students use writing to explore issues in contemporary Philadelphia’s social and cultural contexts. Through reading, discussing and writing about full-length books and articles, students learn the rudiments of writing college-level academic papers. Honors and English as Second Language versions of this course are available.


WRTG-211 (Formerly L611) 3-0-3

Writing Seminar II: Business

This course has been designed primarily for students of business. Students focus on critical reading, writing, thinking and researching in print, electronic, observation and interview formats. Students also consider economic, social and political perspectives as applied to workplace communication and their professions. Students produce individual and group projects, including oral and visual presentations, as they focus both on the process as well as the final products of their work.

Prerequisites: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX. May not be taken CR/NC.


WRTG-215 (Formerly L612) 3-0-3

Writing Seminar II: Design

This course has been designed primarily for students of design. Students focus on critical reading, writing, thinking, and researching in print, electronic, observation and interview formats. Students also consider economic, social and political perspectives as applied to workplace communication and their professions. Formal aesthetic concerns are also addressed. Students produce individual and group projects, including oral and visual presentations, as they focus both on the process as well as the final products of their work.

Prerequisites: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX. May not be taken CR/NC.


WRTG-217 (Formerly L613) 3-0-3

Writing Seminar II: Science, Engineering, Technology and Health Professions

This course has been designed primarily for students of science, engineering, technology, and the health professions. Students focus on critical reading, writing, thinking and researching in print, electronic, observation and interview formats. Students also consider economic, social and political perspectives as applied to workplace communication and their professions. Students produce individual and group projects, including oral and visual presentations, as they focus both on the process as well as the final products of their work.

Prerequisite: WRTG-101, HIST-1XX. May not be taken CR/NC.